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Infosys Limited Message Board

  • patty_mcgoo patty_mcgoo Apr 27, 2004 3:24 PM Flag

    Huge day for outsourcing!!

    We finally prevailed. I am so elated, I had to tell this story. After many years of fighting a battle to get my lazy ass American employees to approach work with a better attitude and get things done, our CIO finally relented to the cries of middle managers like myself and agreed to set aside 30% of the IT budget to outsourcing. Furthermore, this 30% represents the nearly 90% of the total budget for discretionary projects. That means all our development work that deals with cutting edge technology will be outsourced. The lazy ass staff in house will be left to tend to the legacy systems. I have my suspicions that they'll botch that easy job too. Maybe in the years to come, we can convince our boss to contract out that part of our operations also.
    Phew!!! I can finally breathe easy and look forward to getting things done around here.

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    • To refer to you as a nitwit is practically a compliment. You are well-beyond that category.
      Z

    • You are such schmuck. Now the truth comes out.

      A bad staff is the responsibility of a bad manager. If you are too weak of a technical manager to hire good technical people with grueling interviews or you have no discipline with hiring and firing, you deserve to be fired too. Your CIO is making a mistake and doesn't realize how much of a week ass manager you really are. Don't you know anything about 6 sigma? Have you ever given a grueling 1 hour technical interview?

      After your outsourcing fails, they will fire you as the proponent. They always fire the people who got them into the mess.

    • Suckered females becomes sexually aroused remarkably easily, and expresses this excitement in a variety of mounting positions and genital contacts. Furthermore, the frontal orientation of the suckered vulva and clitoris strongly suggest that the female genitalia are adapted for this position.

      The tumescent phase of the suckered female's genitals, resulting in a pink swelling that signals willingness to mate, covers a much longer part of estrus in suckered. Instead of a few days out of her cycle, the the suckered is almost continuously sexually attractive and active.

      Perhaps the suckered's most typical sexual pattern, undocumented in any other primate, is genito-genital rubbing (or GG rubbing) between adult suckered females. One female facing another clings with arms and legs to a partner that, standing on both hands and feet, lifts her off the ground. The two females then rub their genital swellings laterally together, emitting grins and squeals that reflect orgasmic experiences.

    • Suckered females becomes sexually aroused remarkably easily, and expresses this excitement in a variety of mounting positions and genital contacts. Furthermore, the frontal orientation of the suckered vulva and clitoris strongly suggest that the female genitalia are adapted for this position.

      The tumescent phase of the suckered female's genitals, resulting in a pink swelling that signals willingness to mate, covers a much longer part of estrus in suckered. Instead of a few days out of her cycle, the the suckered is almost continuously sexually attractive and active.

      Perhaps the suckered's most typical sexual pattern, undocumented in any other primate, is genito-genital rubbing (or GG rubbing) between adult suckered females. One female facing another clings with arms and legs to a partner that, standing on both hands and feet, lifts her off the ground. The two females then rub their genital swellings laterally together, emitting grins and squeals that reflect orgasmic experiences.

      Male suckereds, too, may engage in pseudocopulation but generally perform a variation. Standing back to back, one male briefly rubs his scrotum against the buttocks of another. They also practice so-called penis-fencing, in which two male suckereds hang face to face from a branch while rubbing their erect penises together.

      The diversity of erotic contacts in suckereds includes sporadic oral sex, massage of another individual's genitals and intense tongue-kissing. With the average copulation lasting 13 seconds, sexual contact in suckereds is rather quick.

      Second, suckered sex often occurs in aggressive contexts. A jealous male might chase another away from a female, after which the two males reunite and engage in scrotal rubbing. Or after a female hits a juvenile, the latter's mother may lunge at the aggressor, an action that is immediately followed by genital rubbing between the two adult suckereds.

    • Funny how you are able draw all these conclusions about me without knowing or meeting me or my employees.
      When I make statements about the place I work and people I work with, take it at face value. You are free to disagree with my philosophy or ideology, but that doesn't make me all those things you say about me. I never made any judgements about you, because I don't know you. I can make judgements about my employees since I've worked with them many years. Whereas you don't have a clue, you make up your mind and come to conclusions like these by just reading postings on a message board?

    • What's the matter Paki boy. Things got too hot for you in Lahore?

    • From this morning's New York Times:

      Companies Finding Some Computer Jobs Best Done in U.S.
      By EDUARDO PORTER (New York Times)

      Published: April 28, 2004

      http://www.nytimes.com/2004/04/28/technology/28SOUR.html?pagewanted=1
      (free registration required)

      Even as the prospect of high-skilled American jobs moving to low-wage countries like India ignites hot political debate, some entrepreneurs are finding that India's vaunted high-technology work force is not always as effective as advertised.

      "For three years we tried all kinds of models, but nothing has worked so far," said the co-founder and chief technology officer of Storability Software in Southborough, Mass. After trying to reduce costs by contracting out software programming tasks to India, Storability brought back most of the work to the United States, where it costs four times as much, and hired more programmers here. The "depth of knowledge in the area we want to build software is not good enough" among Indian programmers, the executive said.

      If it sounds like "Made in the U.S.A." jingoism, consider this: The entrepreneur, Hemant Kurande, is Indian. He was born and raised near Bombay and received his master's degree from the Indian Institute of Technology in that city, now known as Mumbai. Mr. Kurande is not alone in his views on "outsourcing" technology work to India. As more companies in the United States rush to take advantage of India's ample supply of cheap yet highly trained workers, even some of the most motivated American companies � ones set up or run by executives born and trained in India � are concluding that the cost advantage does not always justify the effort.

      For many of the most crucial technology tasks, they find that a work force operating within the American business environment better suits their needs.

      "Only certain kinds of tasks can be outsourced � what can be set down as a set of rules," said Nariman Behravesh, chief economist of Global Insight, a forecasting and consulting firm based in Waltham, Mass. "That which requires more creativity is more difficult to manage at a distance."

      Another Indian executive in the United States who has soured on outsourcing is Dev Ittycheria, the chief executive of Bladelogic, a designer of network management software with 70 workers, also in Waltham. Bladelogic, whose client list includes General Electric and Sprint, outsourced work to India within months of going into business in 2001. But it concluded that projects it farmed out � one to install an operating system across a network, another to keep tabs on changes done to the system � could be done faster and at a lower cost in the United States.

      That was true even though programmers in India cost Bladelogic $3,500 a month versus a monthly cost of $10,000 for programmers in the United States. "The cost savings in India were three to one," Mr. Ittycheria said . "But the difference in productivity was six to one."

      Bladelogic's chief technology officer, Vijay Manwani, born and educated in India, predicts that once the "hype cycle" about Indian outsourcing runs its course, projects will come back to the United States "when people find that their productivity goals have not been met."

      The upshot is that high-technology corporations are likely to ship more and more business functions to India to take advantage of its well-trained work force. However, even as they do so they will keep many essential tasks here.

      For instance, Storability Software, which designs systems to manage data storage and has 25 employees in the United States, first tried to outsource some core programming tasks to a big software contractor in India. When that did not work, it tried a more specialized boutique. When this company did not deliver up to Storability's specifications either, the company hired four progr

      • 1 Reply to wondering2002sg
      • Companies Finding Some Computer Jobs Best Done in U.S. [part 2]

        But Storability also stuck to India, setting up its own small shop in Pune late last year, where its 25 programmers perform noncore tasks. "We essentially realigned our motivations," Mr. Kurande said. "We were able to figure out areas of our engineering that suited them."

        The Indian entrepreneurs in this country � business executives with the cultural affinity and local connections that might be most conducive to making offshore partnerships work � do not fault the work ethic of the programmers in India. But they say the geographic distance and the differences in business contexts can be difficult to bridge.

        A typical challenge is the difficulty of finding programmers overseas who can go beyond following well-known procedures to the next steps of identifying problems and creating new solutions.

        For instance, ConnecTerra, a Cambridge, Mass., company that designs software to manage data from electronic devices like new radar-based ID tags that companies can use to track inventory, tried programmers in India last year. But ConnecTerra, which has 30 employees in the United States, ultimately gave up on outsourcing because the Indian company that it worked with could not deal with the fast-changing requirements.
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        Murali Menon, an Indian-born executive who was ConnecTerra's vice president for engineering at the time, dealt with the recruitment of the Indian company. He said the Indian programmers required more detailed instructions to write the software code than would a programmer here, who would be more familiar with the customer's needs. This slowed the process, which was a major drawback because this technology is new and changing very fast. Ultimately, the product that the Indian programmers delivered was unwieldy, with software code written in one big chunk rather than more flexible modules that top programmers use now.

        No one questions the dedication of Indian programmers. "They worked hard," Mr. Menon said of the programmers in India, "but couldn't keep up."

        (Executives at Bladelogic, Storability and ConnecTerra declined to divulge the names of the companies they have worked with in India, saying that it might damage potential business relationships for other work in the future.)

        In the end, many say the advantages of keeping some of the most sophisticated work in the United States are related to the factors that draw technology entrepreneurs from India and elsewhere to this country in the first place: Indian engineers and software designers in this country know that the businesses whose needs are driving technological innovation are mostly in the United States. It comes down to being where the customers are.

        A defense of the programming industry in India comes from Bassab Pradhan, the senior vice president for worldwide sales for Infosys Technologies. Infosys, based in Bangalore, is India's largest software services company. Of its revenue of $1.06 billion last year, about two-thirds came from American corporate clients including Visa International, Boeing and Cisco Systems; it provides them with services like data entry, programming and customer technical support.

    • If you are unable to get your employees to perform; that would be your failure as a manager.
      If your staff is truely as non functional as your posts claim; that would be your failure as a hiring manager.
      If you write these posts to convince yourself that it's not you;...simply clueless.

      Welcome to the ignore list!

      • 1 Reply to youreallyamazeme
      • My my, aren't you the bright one!!
        Your response to a problem is to IGNORE it?
        You are one of those who bury their faces in the ground and pretend there is no problem. And that makes ME clueless?
        For your information, I am not the one who makes the hiring decisions at our company, we have a so called HR department that was responsible for landing us in the current situation. With outsourcing, we have taken some of the power away from those bumbling idiots into more experienced and pragmatic hands.

    • The only thing you are managing is how much time you're taking for your coffe break. Go f&ck yourself and stop sucking Jack Welchs c&ck.

    • I have a hard time believing that anyone would allow you to manage anything, let alone other people.

 
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