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Akamai Technologies, Inc. Message Board

  • pantone101naturalblondie pantone101naturalblondie Nov 21, 2009 10:08 PM Flag

    Akamai's Value Added Solutions (1)

    PE, this is going to be five posts, so I'm making it a new topic. I'm replying to your 2:34 PM post "Re: A backhanded slam? (2)" (208241) at

    http://messages.finance.yahoo.com/Stocks_%28A_to_Z%29/Stocks_A/threadview?m=tm&bn=700&tid=207591&mid=208241

    http://
    messages.finance.yahoo.com/Stocks_%28A_to_Z
    %29/Stocks_A/threadview?m=tm&bn=700&tid=
    207591&mid=208241

    >>Something to the effect he only analizes CDN and so not knowing how much of Akamai's business is CDN makes it hard to compare Limelight and Akamai.<<

    And soon he'll have to deal with Limelight's ratio. DR's difficulties aside, comparing the VAS progress of Akamai vs Limelight should be very interesting. Let the competition begin!

    >>Well prove me wrong. No special hardware the stuff just runs on Akamai's platform. That ought to save some money.<<

    Maybe a lot of money since Akamai's platform is already humming?

    >>Not really [no clues], you'd probably have to take the course to learn the specifics of how it [DSA] works, but clearly it's a one of the VAS they talk about.<<

    I've been trying to derive from the CCs what those VAS are. The history spanning the CCs gives glimpses into their current and anticipated impact on Akamai's revenues. Got your Murine handy? :-)

    In the 2005 Q4 CC, Sagan announced:

    <We achieved the number of significant accomplishments that improved the financial strength of the company and positioned us well for future growth. Among the highlights, we launched our Web-Application Acceleration service at mid year, opening an important new market opportunities.>

    Near the end of that CC he said:

    <. . . we sell them our more advanced services that’s has always been our effort for the last 7 years, is to add value in the platform and sell people increased functionality, web application acceleration is just one example but we really have portfolio of things that we offer our customers and in their online efforts to become more and more mission critical, they are more concerned with reliability, security, protection from denial service attacks, global load balancing, reporting and real time message of what’s going with their traffic and those are all things that we offer to add value that go beyond the traditional bandwidth pricing. . . .>

    Do you remember whether some of those services are what Limelight is just beginning to talk up and offer?

    DR has complained so much about Akamai's CDN pricing, but those value-adds, which I don't remember DR seriously considering, would of course add to it.

    In the 2006 Q2 CC, Sagan said "Ours is really a value-added services, software-type business with very high margins."

    And in 2007 Q4 he said:

    <We certainly are seeing them [the media] uptake things like Stream OS and other value-added services. They are running very complex business models online and they are getting more and more serious about how they make money. . . .

    . . .

    . . . you see how many of the top brands we have in every vertical we play in.

    But what we also knew was that we weren’t deeply penetrated into many of them, that they were just starting their web businesses, they were just starting to use our services and that there was a huge opportunity to grow what we were doing in those accounts to sell them more value added services and migrate more of their business online. And it’s just a much more efficient use of our resources.

    . . .

    . . . If there are some customers who really matter, go get them. You get deeply embedded and you grow as their businesses grow. And we are seeing that . . . .>


    More . . .

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    • pantone101naturalblondie pantone101naturalblondie Dec 29, 2009 10:17 AM Flag

      >>Just lay off the KFC.<<

      LLOL Cain't . . . it's good stuff. :-)

    • pantone101naturalblondie pantone101naturalblondie Dec 28, 2009 4:03 PM Flag

      >>There'd be plenty of money to pay you for your gold and they'd have to pay you plenty for it.Then you would have to use plenty of that money to buy dried beans, rice, and banana chips or whatever. The thing is, when money loses its purchasing power through inflation you don't want to be holding it. You want to be holding real property or the rights to real property (a few silos full of beans and rice would work).<<

      So the one with the most cash loses. What a reversal of the usual.

      It makes sense that while goods are reasonably priced, I should buy and stock up. I'd better start writing my grocery list. Let's see, Nestle Quik should last as long as dried beans and rice . . .

    • >>. . . finger-smear magnet. :-))<<

      Just lay off the KFC.

    • pantone101naturalblondie pantone101naturalblondie Dec 28, 2009 3:21 PM Flag

      >>Isn't that the whole point of the bumpy touch screen? If it looks like a keyboard and and feels like a keyboard it's a . . .<<

      . . . finger-smear magnet. :-))

      I've been dealing with a house emergency (much better than a people emergency), so started at the back of the book just now. Now back to the front of the book after I pour me a calming cola . . .

    • >> . . . I'd like iSlate for traveling, even to just the supermarket, the keyboard lack might compel me to choose a laptop instead. . . .<<

      Isn't that the whole point of the bumpy touch screen? If it looks like a keyboard and and feels like a keyboard it's a . . .

    • >>Even if no one would have cash to pay me for the gold? How would that compare to investing in a home depot of dried beans, rice, and banana flakes? :-)<<

      There'd be plenty of money to pay you for your gold and they'd have to pay you plenty for it.Then you would have to use plenty of that money to buy dried beans, rice, and banana chips or whatever. The thing is, when money loses its purchasing power through inflation you don't want to be holding it. You want to be holding real property or the rights to real property (a few silos full of beans and rice would work).

    • pantone101naturalblondie pantone101naturalblondie Dec 28, 2009 10:52 AM Flag

      >>No I don't know much about faxing . . . never used them. I don't know why anyone uses them while there's e-mail and PDFs.<<

      I've faxed, but rarely. It's been years since I last faxed anything. One reason for faxing is a required signature. But a workaround is to write your signature in a graphic program, copy it, and paste it into the end of your document, then attach that document to an email. So far, people have accepted my copied and pasted 'graphic' signature. Also, it's not easy to tamper with a fax. Altering email text is a piece of cake. So for legal purposes, especially, a fax is the best way to send a text document needed ASAP unless you mail it via some express method.

      >>Well that's an improvement.<<

      Yes, and if you'd like to keep a Wikipedia article about the iSlate, you'd better run, not walk, to Wiki and quick save it as a PDF. Well, well, that was fast. A couple hours ago that article was one of Wiki's particularly endangered species, but the threat has been deled.

      <Laura DiDio, a principal analyst at ITIC, has called the iSlate "the next big thing." DiDio is particularly optimistic that the built-in camera will be useful for video conferencing on the go. Dan Ackerman of CNET states that the iSlate will "blow everyone away." Most analysts believe that the iSlate will take away significant market share from e-book readers, from netbooks, and from web tablets such as the Joo Joo, although the iSlate will not replace the iPhone.[15]

      Rafe Needleman of CBS News panned the iSlate, saying that it is "attractive if you're a sci-fi fan or have an unlimited gadget budget" but that the lack of a physical keyboard makes the iSlate "an ergonomic disaster."[16]>

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISlate

      Instead of imposing his own personal preference on everyone, why doesn't Steve Jobs make many more people happy by including a USB port for a physical keyboard? As much as I'd like iSlate for traveling, even to just the supermarket, the keyboard lack might compel me to choose a laptop instead. But considering it from the revenue angle, just the hype will sell a bunch.

    • pantone101naturalblondie pantone101naturalblondie Dec 27, 2009 4:17 PM Flag

      >>I take it nothing has ever come of all his allegations. I assume they must not have been verified or the connections were too tenuous to be serious.<<

      I opt for your first conclusion, that Sinclair's allegations were not conclusively proven. Even if they were, do you think Obama would allow them to survive widespread publicity?

      I was just checking out what I thought might be a related consideration, but now that I've found more details it doesn't look like it. A DC murder had taken place in the month after Obama's passport files were breached, "cauterized," but the murdered man, a key witness in the case, had obtained from a State Department employee passport applications' data, not data from any passport itself, unless that information was left out of the WaPo report.

      http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/04/19/AR2008041901891.html

      http://www.
      washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/
      2008/04/19/AR2008041901891.html

      Harris's first name, 'Leiutenant', was a misspelling of 'lieutenant'. He was neither a police or military lieutenant.

      On the same date, the Washington Times reported the murder and included:

      <The Washington Times reported April 5 that contractors for the State Department had improperly accessed passport information for presidential candidates Sens. Hillary Rodham Clinton, Barack Obama and John McCain . . . .

      One agency employee, who was not identified in documents filed in U.S. District Court, was implicated in a credit-card fraud scheme after Lt. Harris told federal authorities he obtained "passport information from a co-conspirator who works for the U.S. Department of State.">

      http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2008/apr/19/key-witness-in-passport-fraud-case-fatally-shot/

      http://www.
      washingtontimes.com/news/2008/apr/19/key
      -witness-in-passport-fraud-case-fatally-shot/

      You probably remember the contractor who breached Obama's file was employed by a firm headed by John Brennan, Obama's top terrorism and intelligence adviser. The murder link is too tenuous to be considered evidence related to Obama, but it is part of Washington operations.

      >>That's why I think it would be wise to buy some before it [the financial situation] implodes.<<

      Even if no one would have cash to pay me for the gold? How would that compare to investing in a home depot of dried beans, rice, and banana flakes? :-)

    • >> . . . I also don't know why some faxes would have the fax info on the bottom and others at the top, as Larry contended. Do you know anything about that? It's the fax protocol that was my stumbling block.<<

      No I don't know much about faxing . . . never used them. I don't know why anyone uses them while there's e-mail and PDFs.

      >>Wikipedia has an article on it now, quite long. And a note in a box says:

      <The neutrality of this article is disputed. . . .<<

      Well that's an improvement.

    • >>At Larry Johnson's 'No Quarter' blog, this 2008 article is _loaded_ with information:<<

      I take it nothing has ever come of all his allegations. I assume they must not have been verified or the connections were too tenuous to be serious.

      >>If the financial situation implodes, who would have cash to buy gold?<<

      That's why I think it would be wise to buy some before it implodes.

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