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Halliburton Company Message Board

  • libtards_r_bootlickers libtards_r_bootlickers May 10, 2013 1:36 PM Flag

    How are the GLOBAL WARMING and DROUGHT predictions working out for you Al Gore bootlickers?

    Hmm?

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    • freddyfreedom@rocketmail.com freddyfreedom May 10, 2013 2:46 PM Flag

      Everyone can see global warming all around them except for the 30% who voted for Bush and were sure that Saddam had WMD.

    • freddyfreedom@rocketmail.com freddyfreedom May 10, 2013 2:30 PM Flag

      Its amazing to think that the climate deniers are still denying whats clear to everyone around them.
      Winters are milder, summers are hotter. Droughts and floods are more common.
      Just alst year, we had a massive drought that drive beef prices through the roof.

    • freddyfreedom@rocketmail.com freddyfreedom May 10, 2013 2:00 PM Flag

      telltale fingerprints of climate change. Those fingerprints are showing up—in the autumn floods of 2000 in England and Wales that were the worst on record, in the 2003 European heat wave that caused 14,000 deaths in France, in Hurricane Katrina—and, yes, probably even in Nashville. This doesn't mean that the storms or hot spells wouldn't have happened at all without climate change, but as scientists like Trenberth say, they wouldn't have been as severe if humankind hadn't already altered the planet's climate.

      No longer is global warming an abstract concept, affecting faraway species, distant lands or generations far in the future. Instead, climate change becomes personal. Its hand can be seen in the corn crop of a Maryland farmer ruined when soaring temperatures shut down pollination or the $13 billion in damage in Nashville, with the Grand Ole Opry flooded and sodden homes reeking of rot. "All of a sudden we're not talking about polar bears or the Maldives any more," says Nashville-based author and environmental journalist Amanda Little. "Climate change translates into mold on my baby's crib. We're talking about homes and schools and churches and all the places that got hit."

    • freddyfreedom@rocketmail.com freddyfreedom May 10, 2013 1:58 PM Flag

      Storm Warnings: Extreme Weather Is a Product of Climate Change

      More violent and frequent storms, once merely a prediction of climate models, are now a matter of observation. Part 1 of a three-part series

      In this year alone massive blizzards have struck the U.S. Northeast, tornadoes have ripped through the nation, mighty rivers like the Mississippi and Missouri have flowed over their banks, and floodwaters have covered huge swaths of Australia as well as displaced more than five million people in China and devastated Colombia. And this year's natural disasters follow on the heels of a staggering litany of extreme weather in 2010, from record floods in Nashville, Tenn., and Pakistan, to Russia's crippling heat wave.

      These patterns have caught the attention of scientists at the National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, N.C., part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). They've been following the recent deluges' stunning radar pictures and growing rainfall totals with concern and intense interest. Normally, floods of the magnitude now being seen in North Dakota and elsewhere around the world are expected to happen only once in 100 years. But one of the predictions of climate change models is that extreme weather—floods, heat waves, droughts, even blizzards—will become far more common. "Big rain events and higher overnight lows are two things we would expect with [a] warming world," says Deke Arndt, chief of the center's Climate Monitoring Branch. Arndt's group had already documented a stunning rise in overnight low temperatures across the U.S. So are the floods and spate of other recent extreme events also examples of predictions turned into cold, hard reality?

      Increasingly, the answer is yes. Scientists used to say, cautiously, that extreme weather events were "consistent" with the predictions of climate change. No more. "Now we can make the statement that particular events would not have happened the same way without global warming," sa

    • freddyfreedom@rocketmail.com freddyfreedom May 10, 2013 1:54 PM Flag

      . "Hurricane Sandy and the historic droughts, floods and heat waves happening across the country aren't a fluke, but the result of a climate warming much faster than previously thought," he said.

      Summers are longer and hotter, and periods of extreme heat last longer than any living American has previously experienced. Winters are generally shorter and warmer. Rain comes in heavier downpours, though in many regions there are longer dry spells in between.

      Other changes are even more dramatic. Residents of some coastal cities see their streets flood more regularly during storms and high tides. Inland cities near large rivers also experience more flooding, especially in the Midwest and Northeast. Hotter and drier weather and earlier snow melt mean that wildfires in the West start earlier in the year, last later into the fall, threaten more homes, cause more evacuations, and burn more acreage. In Alaska, the summer sea ice that once protected the coasts has receded, and fall storms now cause more erosion and damage that is severe enough that some communities are already facing relocation. ...

      These and other observed climatic changes are having wide-ranging impacts in every region of our country and most sectors of our economy. Some of these changes can be beneficial, such as longer growing seasons in many regions and a longer shipping season on the Great Lakes. But many more have already proven to be detrimental, largely because society and its infrastructure were designed for the climate of the past, not for the rapidly changing climate of the present or the future.

    • freddyfreedom@rocketmail.com freddyfreedom May 10, 2013 1:52 PM Flag

      The Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have decreased in mass. Data from NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment show Greenland lost 150 to 250 cubic kilometers (36 to 60 cubic miles) of ice per year between 2002 and 2006, while Antarctica lost about 152 cubic kilometers (36 cubic miles) of ice between 2002 and 2005.

    • freddyfreedom@rocketmail.com freddyfreedom May 10, 2013 1:51 PM Flag

      Global sea level rose about 17 centimeters (6.7 inches) in the last century. The rate in the last decade, however, is nearly double that of the last century.

    • freddyfreedom@rocketmail.com freddyfreedom May 10, 2013 1:50 PM Flag

      Last year was the hottest ever.

    • jamesirvin982@rocketmail.com jamesirvin982 May 10, 2013 1:50 PM Flag

      Great Lakes at their lowest point in HISTORY!!!!

    • Its sad that you Republicans are so clueless about the Global Changes that is costing Americans big dollars every year in flooding, droughts and uncommon storms

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