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Trius Therapeutics, Inc. (TSRX) Message Board

  • beavertail_splash beavertail_splash Feb 10, 2013 10:03 AM Flag

    FUTURE OF ANTIBIOTICS

    CBIS wouldn't have spun off their profitable cosmetic division afiliate of GWPRF, now trading as XCHC if there wasn't some sound science behind the company's research. It's hard to pump your research science when you work with an illegal substance but CBIS wanted to concentrate on their potential pharma applications, not on retail-by product cosmeticss which may have limited upside downstream as competition moves in. I use hemp products & don't use recreational MJ, but believe it has many legit medical applications that have not been fully developed. We need new antibiotic treatments that are not the conventional ones currently in use. Current antibiotics that pharma is promoting develope resistant MRSA strains and quickly become ineffective to these new superbugs.
    #$%$ has long been known to have antibacterial properties and was studied in the 1950s as a treatment for tuberculosis and other diseases. But research into using #$%$ as an antibiotic has been limited by poor knowledge of the plant's active ingredients and by the controversy surrounding its illegal use as a recreational drug.
    Substances harvested from #$%$ plants could soon outshine conventional antibiotics in the escalating battle against drug-resistant bacteria. The compounds, called cannabinoids, appear to be unaffected by the mechanism that superbugs like MRSA use to evade existing antibiotics. Scientists from Italy and the United Kingdom, who published their research in the Journal of Natural Products, say that #$%$-based topical creams could also be developed to treat persistent skin infections.
    STAY TUNNED

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    • ...for yahoo to censor the word #$%$ and Mary Jane there must be some truth to this attempt at covering up this knowledge or discussion. Big pharma has always been repressive in protecting their turf much to the detriment of many lost lives. Just look at the Sundance film festivals " Drugs on Fire" documentary where the west's BIG pharmas effectively prevented the distribution of cheaper generic HIV drugs in east Africa allowing approx. 1.5 million to die needlessly. I call it blood profits. Now they censor message boards and write libelous articles on any potential competition. This could all be a tin foil conspiracy rant but weird stuff like board censorship and seeking Alpo`s Fraud Squad hit jobs lead me to suspect some big pharma interests maybe at stake.

      • 2 Replies to beavertail_splash
      • correction it was 10million lives lost.
        "Fire in the Blood made its world premiere at the Sundance Film Festival last month, competing in the World Cinema Documentary category, and now it's heading to theaters, but only in select UK and Irish cinemas at the moment.

        The feature documentary is titled Fire In The Blood, from director Dylan Mohan Gray, and is described as an intricate tale of "medicine, monopoly and malice," which follows an improbable group of people who decided to fight back against western governments and pharmaceutical companies that blocked low-cost antiretroviral drugs from reaching AIDS patients in continental Africa, in the late 1990s and early 2000s, causing some 10 million or more unnecessary deaths.

        The film screened at Sundance to strong reviews, and will be released theatrically in select UK and Irish cinemas later this month"

        Try finding this feature in a US mainstream theatre.

      • can a bus! can a bus! can a bus!

 
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