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Golar LNG Ltd. Message Board

  • ellaspicks ellaspicks Dec 3, 2010 11:14 AM Flag

    Does Karen Finerman know something we don't?

    GLNG now 14% of her portfolio, an increase of 1257.5%, and by far her largest holding.

    http://stockpickr.com/pro/portfolio/karen-finerman-metropolitan-capital-advisors/

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    • "Comtex SmarTrend(R)

      Shares of Golar LNG (NASDAQ:GLNG) traded at a new 52-week high today of $19.39. Approximately 126,000 shares have traded hands today vs. average 30-day volume of 266,000 shares.

      Golar LNG is currently trading at $19.31, approximately 18.2% above its 50-day moving average of $16.33. SmarTrend will be monitoring shares of GLNG to see if this bullish momentum will continue.

      In the last five trading sessions, the 50-day MA has climbed 1.8% while the 200-day MA has risen 0.69%.

      In the past 52 weeks, shares of Golar LNG have traded between a low of $9.42 and a high of $19.26 and are now at $19.25, which is 104% above that low price.

      SmarTrend currently has shares of Golar LNG in an Uptrend and issued the Uptrend alert on September 03, 2010 at $11.26. The stock has risen 70.9% since the Uptrend alert was issued."

    • http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-02-16/lng-tanker-rates-seen-doubling-as-ship-glut-disappears-freight-markets.html

      Feb. 16 (Bloomberg) -- Record demand for liquefied natural- gas is causing the decade-long glut of vessels that carry the fuel to disappear, doubling freight rates and at least tripling profit for shipping lines Golar LNG Ltd. and Exmar NV.

      Consumption of LNG, liquefied by cooling the gas to about minus 260 degrees Fahrenheit, is rising 5.1 percent at a time when nations from the U.K. to South Korea are increasing curbs on pollution. Natural gas emits about 50 percent less carbon dioxide than coal and power companies are also burning more because it’s cheaper after plunging 30 percent since the end of 2008 while coal rose 52 percent and oil almost doubled.

      While owners of oil tankers and coal carriers are slowing down, anchoring ships and scrapping them because rental rates have been unprofitable, gas ships are sailing at the fastest speeds since at least 2008, data compiled by Bloomberg show. Average spot LNG tanker rates will about double to $70,000 a day this year, the highest since 2007, according to Martin Korsvold, an analyst with Pareto Securities AS in Oslo, whose ratings on Golar earned investors an 87 percent return in six months.

      “High-growth economies such as China and India are using more and more natural gas and Europe is using more LNG for environmental reasons,” said Zach Allen, president of Pan Eurasian Enterprises Inc., a Raleigh, North Carolina-based company tracking gas shipments. “It will benefit the LNG tanker owners more than anyone else because there are really very few additional tankers coming on line.”

      Lake Charles

      Since the first LNG shipment from Lake Charles in Louisiana to the U.K. in 1959, the industry has expanded to import facilities in 23 countries, according to Clarkson Plc, the world’s biggest shipbroker. Exxon Mobil Corp. says natural gas will be the fastest-growing major fuel through 2030 and bought XTO Energy Inc. in June for $34.9 billion, giving it proprietary technology used to get gas.

      Increasing profit is encouraging owners to sail vessels faster, with the average speed of the fleet increasing to 13.4 knots last week, from as low as 12.1 knots in July, according to ship-tracking data compiled by Bloomberg. It’s also spurring them to stop idling tankers. There were an average of 51 anchored last week, down from 91 in June, the data show.

      The opposite is happening elsewhere in the merchant fleet. Returns for owners of supertankers dropped 35 percent last year and were last at $48,333 on the benchmark Saudi Arabia-to-Japan route while for capesize ships carrying coal and iron ore they declined 46 percent and were last at $7,189, according to data from the Baltic Exchange. The bourse in London publishes assessments for more than 50 maritime routes.

      Vessel Surplus

      Most of that slump is being caused by a surplus of vessels rather than a slowing global economy. New orders are equal to 24 percent of the supertanker fleet and 43 percent of existing capesizes, according to Redhill, Surrey-based IHS Fairplay, which compiles data on ships, ports and vessel movements. The orders were mostly made in 2007 and 2008 when daily income rose to $177,036 for supertankers and $233,988 for capesizes.

      In 2008, 13 percent of the LNG tanker fleet was idled, compared with 3 percent of the oil-tanker fleet and less than 1 percent of the dry bulk fleet, the United Nations estimates. Golar in a report in November said there had been “more or less 10 years with structural overcapacity” in the fleet.

      [...]

    • 3 hours 28 minutes ago - PSM via Comtex
      Comtex SmarTrend(R)

      Shares of Golar LNG (NASDAQ:GLNG) traded at a new 52-week high today of $18.88. Approximately 88,000 shares have traded hands today vs. average 30-day volume of 258,000 shares.

      Golar LNG is currently trading at $18.74, approximately 16.8% above its 50-day moving average of $16.04. SmarTrend will be monitoring shares of GLNG to see if this bullish momentum will continue.

      In the last five trading sessions, the 50-day MA has climbed 2.54% while the 200-day MA has risen 1.06%.

      In the past 52 weeks, shares of Golar LNG have traded between a low of $9.42 and a high of $18.67 and are now at $18.57, which is 97% above that low price.

      SmarTrend currently has shares of Golar LNG in an Uptrend and issued the Uptrend alert on September 03, 2010 at $11.26. The stock has risen 65.8% since the Uptrend alert was issued.

    • <<Kenai exports, which rely on the use of a single tanker, remained steady.>>

      I think that's an excellent demonstration of the state of LNG shipping. A whole liquefaction train feeding a single tanker.

    • "Exports from Alaska could cease by April or May this year, a Conoco spokeswoman said. The small-scale plant, which has been shipping liquefied natural gas to Asia since 1969, will be mothballed for potential future use.

      Conoco, which operates and owns 70 percent of the plant, said “market conditions in Asia” were behind the decision to shut the plant, while Marathon, which owns the remaining 30 percent of the facility, said that domestic gas supply declines were also a factor.

      “The business case did not make it feasible to continue L.N.G. exports,” a Marathon spokeswoman said, adding that drilling activity in the Cook Inlet, which supplies gas to Kenai, has not offset declining production rates.

      “The decision to cease exports will enable us to continue to meet our contractual obligations to supply gas to the region.”

      Liquefied gas demand in Asia soared last year as demand in the major importers Japan and Korea recovered from recession. The greater demand was met mainly by increases in Asian and Middle Eastern production, which kept the market well supplied in 2010. Kenai exports, which rely on the use of a single tanker, remained steady.

      Conoco and Marathon have a license to export liquefied natural gas from Alaska to Asia until 2013, under an extension granted last year."

      http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/11/business/energy-environment/11gas.html

    • Fluor Corporation !!!

      " Last month Fluor (FLR) announced that it had won a $3.5 billion contract to build a liquefied natural gas project in Australia.

      Why is one deal so important? First, because it demonstrates that Fluor can sign big energy infrastructure deals in the face of intense competition from Asian engineering and construction companies—in the Asian companies’ backyard. Second, the deal will add to a near record order backlog at the end of the third quarter. (Fluor reports its fourth quarter numbers on February 23.) Third, most Wall Street estimates for Fluor’s earnings in 2011 are based on a shift in the mix of the company’s projects from energy to lower-margin mining work. Standard & Poor’s, for example, sees revenue climbing at a double digit rate in 2011—after a 5% decline in 2010—but with operating margins falling from the 5.2% rate in 2010 on a shift toward mining and away from energy. More energy projects in 2011 would push margins above analyst estimates. And I’d say there’s a good chance for higher than expected levels of energy work with oil prices pressing $100 a barrel at the moment. (Brent Crude futures traded at $99.29 a barrel on February 7.)

      Fluor looks to be a major beneficiary of the huge surge in capital spending in the oil and gas industry (For example, Chevron has announced a $26 billion capital spending budget for 2011, up from a $21.6 billion budget in 2010), in the mining industry (Rio Tinto, for example, reports that it will raise its capital budget for 2011 to $11 billion from $5 billion in 2010), and in infrastructure spending by governments from China to Brazil.

      New Fluor CEO David Seaton, who just took over the top slot, says that Fluor can double its sales and order backlog over the next ten years. There’s a measure of the new guy’s desire to rally the troops in that prediction, but Fluor actually shouldn’t have a big trouble in reaching those targets. Revenue went from $9 billion to $22 billion from 2001 to 2009."

      http://jubakpicks.com/2011/02/08/buy-fluor-flr

    • I know of Chicago Bridge and Iron.

      Anyone know of any other enginnering/construction firms in this LNG terminal business?

    • Thank you, ujok_wehu!

    • The LNG fleet is much smaller than crude, bulk, or container fleets. Near as I can tell, most of the LNG carriers are small parts of larger conglomerates (I'm tempted to say "zaibatus"). See http://www.shipbuildinghistory.com/today/highvalueships/lngactivefleet.htm

      GLNG started as the only US pure play on LNG shipping, but of course now they're more of a terminal player. TGP, although they call themselves "LNG" also have significant LPG and crude carriers. I think of them more as TK's version of SFL.

      The rest seem not to be really tradable: National Gas Shipping Co is a division of Abu Dhabi National Oil; Qatar Gas; China LNG Shipping is a joint venture of Kong Ming, COSCO, and BP; BW Gas is private and mostly LPG anyway; STASCO (Shell); MISC; Mitsui; the J# Consortia are JVs of MOL, NYK, Mitsui, K-Line, etc.

      From watching the development of terminal projects over the past few years, it really looks like the project proposal always includes a transporter, often new ships to be built and owned by the gas producer or the take-off agent. I suspect that these new terminals need to mature and expand for a few years to provide demand for truly independent LNG carriers. However, the cryogenic nature of their cargo may make 'down time' too expensive even so (although I don't know whether the tanks are usually kept cold during return trips).

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