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Ultralife Corp. Message Board

  • richardred1 richardred1 Apr 19, 2013 9:56 AM Flag

    Texas Instruments' Lead Battery ICs

    Lead batteries are better than their lithium counterparts as they can work in both high and low temperature ranges.

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    • Your lack of understanding battery technology is frightening

      • 1 Reply to battguru
      • I understand the stock more than I do battery technology. I didn't write it, but found it interesting.since I own this stock and live close to the newark plant.. Battguru please explaine why ULBI isn't working on a battery for mobile devices. They already work on many for the military that has to go through rigorous testing for certification. BTW Boeing looks to have found the Lithium problem as they know have the ok to fly the dreamliner. Boeing has teams around the world that are ready to install the new lithium-ion battery systems, but the process will take around five days once it starts.
        Here's more of the article I didn't post.
        Texas Instruments (TXN) or "TI” recently launched its first lead-acid battery management integrated circuits (ICs), bq34z110 gas gauge IC. It comes with TI’s own Impedance Track capacity measurement technology.

        TI’s new IC is a scalable power management device, which can support multi-cell lead-acid battery voltages of 4 V, 12 V, 24 V, 48 V and higher. Such batteries are required in various mobile and stationary applications such as medical instruments, wireless base stations and telecom shelters, e-bikes, inverters and uninterruptible power supplies (UPS).

        Lead batteries are better than their lithium counterparts as they can work in both high and low temperature ranges. The new ICs equipped with TI’s Impedance Track technology informs the user about battery health and charge with 95% accuracy. This information helps prevent sudden shutdown and in the process increases the longevity of the battery and end-equipment. Thus, TI’s new ICs may provide the requisite support for critical instruments.

 
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