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  • collinsofsachse collinsofsachse Sep 15, 2007 8:45 AM Flag

    Beattie Resigns

    http://www.news.com.au/story/0,23599,22410936-421,00.html

    Now we just have to figure out where Ms. Bligh stands.

    Until she says something negative (I haven't found anything yet) about Queensland uranium - looks good for the likes of Laramide, Paladin, Mega and more....

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    • remember this! If a Lady says no she means maybe, if she says maybe she means yes and if she says yes she is no lady!

    • By Angela Macdonald-Smith

      Sept. 14 (Bloomberg) -- Queensland's new Premier Anna Bligh ruled out changing the Australian state's opposition to uranium mining even after her Labor Party decided to allow new production sites for the radioactive metal.

      Bligh, who took over from Peter Beattie this week, gave an ``unequivocal'' commitment the ban on uranium mining in Queensland would stand, said Belinda Carroll, a spokeswoman. Federal Resources Minister Ian Macfarlane called the prohibition ``nonsensical'' in an e-mailed statement today.

      Australia's Labor party, which is in opposition federally yet rules in all the eight states and territories, scrapped a ban on new uranium mines in April, yet Queensland and Western Australia have retained their restrictions at state level. Australia has about 40 percent of the world's known low-cost reserves of uranium, which reached a record price in June.

      Queensland's uranium reserves are worth about A$20 billion ($17 billion) and five mining projects in the state are on hold because of the ban, Macfarlane said in the statement.

      The federal government will take legal advice on whether it may have the power to overrule state bans on uranium mining licenses, Macfarlane said in July. Any federal legislation regulating uranium mining or enrichment would be challenged by the states in the High Court, Stuart MacGregor, a special counsel at law firm Clayton Utz, said in a Sept. 11 article.

      BUT, WHAT ELSE DO YOU EXPECT HER TO SAY INITIALLY? OBVIOUSLY, SHES NOT GOING TO HINT TO LIFTING THE BAN THE FIRST TIME THAT SHE IS ASKED ABOUT IT AFTER THE FORMER LEADER JUST RESIGNED. SO, I DO AGREE THAT SHE WILL EVENTUALLY LIFT THE BAN. I THINK THAT'S THE MAIN REASON FOR BEATTIE'S RESIGNATION. RUSSIAN, CHINESE, AND JAPANESE DELIGATIONS HAVE ALL BEEN IN QUEENSLAND IN THE PAST MONTH WANTING TO INVEST IN URANIUM RESERVES. I PREDICT A LIFT IN THE BAN WITHIN 6 MONTHS.

    • this woman will lift the ban. AUstralia is in a horrible mess economically and her party lifted the national ban. She will put some restrictions and guards in place. HOwever, she needs jobs in Queensland and this will help. She most likely understands that cars kill many more people than nuclear energy ever has!

    • "But in the context of Team Beattie, new pressure points are emerging that rub up uncomfortably with Bligh's ongoing role in the Left, not to mention her activist background (although there's no formal leadership in the parliamentary Left, she acknowledges that she is the faction's senior figure in caucus).

      Uranium policy is a case in point. Prime Minister John Howard suggested in April that Beattie was open to the idea of revisiting the ban on yellowcake mining and processing, sending left-wing unions into a spin.

      Beattie neatly sidestepped the impending brawl by insisting the question was one for the ALP to determine at a national level.

      Bligh is in a difficult position on this issue - she is, after all, minister for state development, and her predecessor in that portfolio, Speaker of Parliament Tony McGrady, has publicly called for a rethink on uranium. Vast reserves of the ore have been identified in the state's north-west and, as McGrady points out, Queensland is missing out on investment that South Australia's pro-uranium Rann Labor government is only too keen to corner. Bligh says she's "quite relaxed about opening up debate again" but insists the ALP national conference early next year is the place to do it. Personally, she's yet to be convinced nuclear power is safe.

      "Sure, I want the jobs, I want the investment but I don't want to put people at risk and I don't want to expose them to dangerous substances," she says."

      http://www.news.com.au/couriermail/story/0,23739,22407043-3102,00.html

 
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