Recent

% | $
Quotes you view appear here for quick access.

CLRS Message Board

  • perfectfilly perfectfilly Jul 26, 2002 8:25 PM Flag

    Disappointment

    If the current management team can't do any better than $2.5 million a quarter, losing another $3.7 million, then they should immediately resign, gracefully let the employees go, liquidate the company, and give the remaining dollars back to the shareholders as a dividend. Senior management should get nothing since they have had years to milk the company with no results. It's time for the shareholders to at least get the cash out before management squanders any more!

    SortNewest  |  Oldest  |  Most Replied Expand all replies
    • Well said, my friend.

    • That's because there's nobody around to write a press release release. Kevin is off to NYC to pursue his dreams of investor relations heaven.

    • >> fact or logic
      They dumped stock just as it
      went down into penny stock land.
      They are in a legal fight over that
      right now.

      >> Fact
      They haven't bothered to get back into this
      stock.

      >> Question
      Has anybody on the board had their company
      awarded a contract or received compenstation
      from Clarus apart from the BOD payments ?

      Why don't you face the issues.
      They promised action. The investors don't even
      get news/pr.

    • sux,

      You're obviously not going to get anywhere by debating with someone that doesn't support an argument by fact or logic. If, as you say, you're not worried about protecting any other investors from his gibberish, then perhaps you should just click the ignore button and save yourself some time? Hmmmmaaaa? Happy Investing.

    • Hey
      I have always said this turkey is going
      down.
      I have always been correct.

      You don't like the logic. At least be even handed bitch at the shills for a change.
      They hurt a lot of people. I haven't hurt anyone.

    • hey my wife needs a big house.
      hey I can't keep the stock just now
      but hey you buy it, we are going to
      sell out to microsoft, Look at the
      nokia deal, Barclay doesn't make
      mistakes, they love clarus,
      We are going to sell above 9.

      As far a using the fact that the
      leaders of a company dump their
      stocks as an indication of the companies
      well being ?

      HEY I DO

      mantra,
      Shill mantra.

      You get the shills to shut up
      I will.

    • You are defending the BOD
      I know you don't buy the options
      you are pathetic.

      They won't spend their money on this
      company they suck

      But so do their defenders.

    • I hesitate to respond because some may think I am defending the BOD. I'm not, but I do believe in accuracy. Why make an uninformed criticism when an accurate attack is so easy. Anyway, here goes...

      "And you never acknowledge that they refuse to
      purchase these options. What does that say
      about their views on this company and the
      prospects of the stock making any money for
      investors."

      They don't purchase options. Options are awarded. They purchase stock. There are reasons, independent of the stock value, that influence if and when to exercise an option to purchase stock. For example, director options are non-qualified which means they don't have as favorable tax treatment as qualified options. Generally, tax is assessed at the time of sale of the underlying stock if the option is qualified. For non-quals, tax is assessed when the option is exercised even if the underlying stock is held. Also, there are significant restrictions on board memebers and other insiders relating to when they can buy and sell the company's stock. This tends to devalue the stock for insiders due to lower liquidity. Additionally, if Enron teaches anything, it certainly stands for the proposition that one should always guard against a portfolio that is overly weighted in one stock. Many employees, including executives, find themselves overweighted in their company's stock and trapped by the rules on insider trading. That is why the SEC created special exceptions to the insider trading rules to allow for specific liquidation plans to be established by officers, directors and employees. The real world is a great deal more complicated than your sophomoric view allows for.

      "? someone might be misled by my opinions ?"

      I'm not sure who made this criticism, but I doubt it is true. Even casual lurkers with modest intelligence can spot your shallow, repetitive bitching. Anyone trading on your lead deserves to lose. Attack Clarus for lack of vision and immature leadership. Question the strategy, or lack thereof. Challenge the decision to invest in any B2B start-up that will agree to license and use your software. And yes, responsibility for any and all of these failures can be charged to the board since they sat by and allowed management to follow one failed strategy with another without holding the authors of those failed strategies accountable for their failures. Criticise the board for failing to remove senior management long ago.

      Just get off this simple-minded mantra of failure by the board to buy stock. Without knowing the individual tax and financial situation of each board member, you can't judge their motives to buy or not buy the company's stock... and you certainly can't use this fact as an indicator for trading in this company's stock.

      Then again, maybe YOU can...

    • Clarus IS trying to sell itself. It's not an easy sale.

      Clarus is selling into a disinterested buyer's market. What does Clarus have to offer? A potload of cash and its NOL.

      A company that needs cash does so by selling assets, borrowing money or issuing stock. So Clarus' target market is someone who needs cash, who doesn't have or doesn't want to part with saleable assets, who would rather issue more stock than borrow money, or who can't efficiently borrow money. A company that needs to raise money in this fashion may not be the strongest company in the world, hence, their stock isn't strong. So the Clarus board is in the position of exchanging a hard asset (cash) for someone's shaky paper.

      The only sweetener for a stronger company is the tax effect of Clarus' NOL. Again, it is a small universe of companies that can effectively use Clarus' NOL, and for whom it would make sense to buy Clarus and go thru the dirty business of closing up shop and dealing with the maintenance contract commitments of Clarus' few customers.

      Like selling a home, it only takes one buyer - but in this case, the buyer is completely in the driver's seat, and Clarus hasn't got much to offer. There is no critical mass of customers, no compelling technology, no market niche to exploit that can't be handled by any number of other means.

      Bottom line - don't expect quick results, and don't expect a huge premium from cash value - in fact, you can make the case that the ultimate sale price will be less than current cash, given the obligations and costs of closing up shop.

    • >> you never acknowledge or report the options
      >> they hold

      And you never acknowledge that they refuse to
      purchase these options. What does that say
      about their views on this company and the
      prospects of the stock making any money for
      investors.

      The point is:

      This company isn't selling
      This BOD has no new plans.

      If they did they would be buying their options.
      I will believe the shill hype when the BOD
      gets off of their money and leads the way.

      Until then I believe they are hanging around
      waiting to milk the cow.

      ? someone might be misled by my opinions ?
      Well if they were they were saved a lot of
      loss.

    • View More Messages