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Analog Devices, Inc. Message Board

buz_idea20 221 posts  |  Last Activity: Apr 5, 2012 1:28 PM Member since: Feb 1, 2012
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  • buz_idea20 by buz_idea20 Apr 5, 2012 1:28 PM Flag

    Yes Sir I agree that 'GMCR Target Price is $86.00'

  • buz_idea20 by buz_idea20 Apr 5, 2012 1:21 PM Flag

    AIG may quickly fly to $35.83, today.

  • Reply to

    SQUEEZE is on....

    by rpm2you Apr 4, 2012 3:31 PM
    buz_idea20 buz_idea20 Apr 5, 2012 1:17 PM Flag

    Yes Sir, I agree, 'too many shorties, $85+ by next week.'

  • Reply to

    KeyBanc upgrades Joy Global a buy, $90.

    by trade_88 Apr 4, 2012 5:52 PM
    buz_idea20 buz_idea20 Apr 5, 2012 11:40 AM Flag

    Barger also said Joy Global has enough cash and income to buy other companies.

    He set a $90 price target for the stock, suggesting that he thinks shares will rise about 21 percent from Tuesday's close.

  • Reply to

    GMCR Target Price is $86.00

    by buz_idea20 Apr 3, 2012 9:47 AM
    buz_idea20 buz_idea20 Apr 3, 2012 10:33 AM Flag

    GMCR P/E 23.66 and EPS next Y 3.69 = $86. Shorts game is over.

    http://www.finviz.com/quote.ashx?t=gmcr&ty=c&ta=1&p=d

    Shorts will get burn.

  • JOY S&P 500 P/E 11.98 and Forward for JOY is P/E 8.69 = $101.

    http://www.finviz.com/quote.ashx?t=joy

    Shorts will get burn.

  • GMCR P/E 23.66 and EPS next Y 3.69 = $86. Shorts game is over.

  • Reply to

    New Price Momentum

    by ralingasa Apr 3, 2012 9:11 AM
    buz_idea20 buz_idea20 Apr 3, 2012 9:25 AM Flag

    $89 by end of the week or $105+ buy out. Shorts game is over.

  • Joy Global Has Reasonable Valuation Upside

    March 30, 2012 by: Valuentum
    As part of our process, we perform a rigorous discounted cash-flow methodology that dives into the true intrinsic worth of companies. In Joy Global's (JOY) case, we think the firm is fairly valued at $89 per share, significantly higher than where it is currently trading ($73).

    For some background, we think a comprehensive analysis of a firm's discounted cash-flow valuation, relative valuation versus industry peers, as well as an assessment of technical and momentum indicators is the best way to identify the most attractive stocks at the best time to buy. This process culminates in what we call our Valuentum Buying Index (click here for an in-depth, narrated presentation on our methodology), which ranks stocks on a scale from 1 to 10, with 10 being the best.

    If a company is undervalued both on a DCF and on a relative valuation basis and is showing improvement in technical and momentum indicators, it scores high on our scale. Joy Global posts a VBI score of 3 on our scale, reflecting our 'fairly valued' DCF assessment of the company, its neutral relative valuation versus peers, and very bearish techinicals. We compare Joy Global to peers Caterpillar (CAT), AGCO Corp (AGCO), CNH Global (CNH), and Deere (DE).

  • GMCR P/E 23.66 and EPS next Y 3.69 = $86.00

  • ME THINK.

  • Reply to

    poor relative strength

    by sellthenewsbuytherumor Apr 2, 2012 11:26 AM
    buz_idea20 buz_idea20 Apr 2, 2012 12:23 PM Flag

    WFM to $50.21, the 200 days moving average.

  • The S&P 500 sure came back from the 1987 crash, but it came back after replacing many of those former winners with the new stocks for the next bull market, WalMart, Microsoft, ToysRUs, Home Depot, Dell Computer, Intel, etc., most of which didn't even exist in the bull market of the 1980s.
    As an indication of the degree to which the changes are made, in 1999, fully 43% of the stocks that comprised the Dow just 10 years previous, are no longer in the Dow. Some are no longer even in business.

    The changes are made even faster in the more speculative indexes like the Nasdaq and Nasdaq 100.

    But even companies that do continue to thrive in the next recovery do not usually see their stocks return to their previous levels. In the next market recovery companies in new technologies usually take over. [2012 update note: That can be seen in the most recent period where high-flying stocks in the 1999 bubble like WalMart, Microsoft, Dell, and the so-called safe and defensive stocks like General Electric, are still 25% to 70% beneath their 1999 levels in spite of the two bull markets since].

  • Well, if the only source you listened to was the mainstream media, you would be left with the distinct impression that the U.S. economy is heading toward a full recovery and that everything is going to be alright. Unfortunately, that is not the case at all. The United States is rapidly becoming poorer as a nation and less competitive in the global marketplace. At the same time, consumer debt levels are rising, corporate debt levels are rising, state and local government debt levels are rising and the U.S. government is indulging in a debt binge unlike anything the world has ever seen. Considering the insane amount of money the U.S. government has been pumping into the economy, we should have seen a much more robust recovery by now

  • Well, if the only source you listened to was the mainstream media, you would be left with the distinct impression that the U.S. economy is heading toward a full recovery and that everything is going to be alright. Unfortunately, that is not the case at all. The United States is rapidly becoming poorer as a nation and less competitive in the global marketplace. At the same time, consumer debt levels are rising, corporate debt levels are rising, state and local government debt levels are rising and the U.S. government is indulging in a debt binge unlike anything the world has ever seen. Considering the insane amount of money the U.S. government has been pumping into the economy, we should have seen a much more robust recovery by now

  • Reply to

    what happened between 4 am and 5 am

    by IBDMAN15 Apr 2, 2012 6:03 AM
    buz_idea20 buz_idea20 Apr 2, 2012 6:10 AM Flag

    AMZN down -$5.5.

  • Fed Chairman Alan Greenspan: June, 1999, when asked if he thought the stock market was in a bubble:

    "Bubbles generally are perceptible only after the fact."

  • The second problem with the buy and hold theory is how long it sometimes takes for even the 'improved' market indexes to come back.
    After the 1929 crash it took 26 years, until 1955, for the Dow to come back. No one has that much patience. A 45 year old investor in 1929 was a 71 year old retiree in 1955, when he would finally have seen his portfolio just back to even. Even that ignores the fact that his portfolio would have had to undergo the same kind of continuous changes in holdings that the indexes did in order to have them come back. And of course changing 43% of holdings every ten years is not buy and hold investing. Actual buy and hold investors would have been holding big 1929 stocks like U.S. Leather, or American Cotton Oil Corp, or Marconi, or Baldwin Locomotive, stocks that never came back.
    Just eleven years after "the market" supposedly finally came back to its 1929 peak, in 1955, the Dow hit 1000 for the first time ever (in 1966), and an investor who bought near that level then spent the next 16 years waiting for the market to come back again. The Dow finally came back to 1000 and moved above it for the first time, in 1982.
    So, of the 53 years between 1929 and 1982, there was a total of 26 + 16, or 42 years when buy and hold investors would have waited for the market to come back. 2012 update note: After the 2000 peak buy and hold investors (if there really were such persons) were still waiting in 2012, 12 years later, for the market to come back.
    The third problem is that a buy and hold investor, by definition, is guaranteed to have to endure every correction, crash, and bear market that the market experiences. Over the last 100 years there have been 22 bear markets, one on average of every 4 � years, and their average declines were 36% (if one were invested only in the stodgy stocks of the Dow).

  • Reply to

    Buy & Hold. The Hype - The Reality!

    by wfmfourty Apr 1, 2012 10:18 PM
    buz_idea20 buz_idea20 Apr 1, 2012 10:31 PM Flag

    The S&P 500 sure came back from the 1987 crash, but it came back after replacing many of those former winners with the new stocks for the next bull market, WalMart, Microsoft, ToysRUs, Home Depot, Dell Computer, Intel, etc., most of which didn't even exist in the bull market of the 1980s.
    As an indication of the degree to which the changes are made, in 1999, fully 43% of the stocks that comprised the Dow just 10 years previous, are no longer in the Dow. Some are no longer even in business.

    The changes are made even faster in the more speculative indexes like the Nasdaq and Nasdaq 100.

    But even companies that do continue to thrive in the next recovery do not usually see their stocks return to their previous levels. In the next market recovery companies in new technologies usually take over. [2012 update note: That can be seen in the most recent period where high-flying stocks in the 1999 bubble like WalMart, Microsoft, Dell, and the so-called safe and defensive stocks like General Electric, are still 25% to 70% beneath their 1999 levels in spite of the two bull markets since].

  • Reply to

    Everything Is Going To Be Alright?

    by wfmfourty Apr 1, 2012 8:09 PM
    buz_idea20 buz_idea20 Apr 1, 2012 8:53 PM Flag

    In an ongoing struggle, residents of a Northern Greece town blockaded politicians, including a Mayor inside City Hall as others blocked the road from police access. 2 officers were injured as 1000 protesters pelted City Hall with rocks, overturned cars and burned tires, reported use of tear gas was extensive and up until the entrance of City Hall. Electricity was also cut inside the building and the surrounding area was cloaked in darkness,no reports of this being an intentional police tactic.

ADI
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