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Dole Food Company, Inc Common S Message Board

philippians4and13 49 posts  |  Last Activity: Aug 12, 2014 4:24 PM Member since: Jan 25, 2002
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  • philippians4and13 by philippians4and13 Aug 12, 2014 4:24 PM Flag

    Nice last hour increase in share price today for KMR. Also, EEQ had similar last hour positive share action. This is one technical factor that is positive for KMR.

    Assuming your KMR stock has significantly appreciated, please consider donating some to charity. However that may be, best wishes with KMR analysis and investing.

  • Hope you saw this from less than 24 hours ago by 24/7 Wall Street:
    "National Oilwell Varco Inc, (NOV) is on the top stocks to buy list at many of the Wall Street firms that we cover. Although earnings for the second quarter showed some weakness in margins, the company announced a record backlog of business that stood at a stunning $13.95 billion. Merrill Lynch has a $86 price target posted, and the consensus target is at $84. Investors receive a 1.4% dividend."

    Also, anyone who believes Berkshire Hathaway is selling NOV, Berkshire having just added significantly to its position, is imprudent in my view. Berkshire is a long-term investor. I have bought NOV twice this month and will take a look at adding more NOV. Notice also the lack of any selling by NOV's president or CEO.

    If you profit from NOV, please consider sharing some of the profits with charity. Best wishes,
    Philippians 4:13

  • I initiated a position today. Buying now is a lower price than Chairman Murdock paid for more than $28 million of his purchase in August. Also, according to Yahoo Finance there has been no insider selling by anyone since 12/2010.

    If you believe the economy will grow amidst increased inflation for physical assets/commodities, then this food sector is a good one for you. If you believe the economy will stay flat or even drop, the food sector is still a good one for you, IMHO.

    DOLE's PEG ratio is 1.33 vs. 1.84 for the industry average. Its P/S ratio is 0.16 vs. 0.58 for the industry average. The P/S ratio is especially nice because of course it is harder to use crafty (though legal) accounting to increase sales than it is to use such accounting to increase earnings. This is not to say DOLE uses crafty accounting: Indeed, institutional holder like AllianceBernstein, Robeco Investment, and Sterling Capital exist, as well as Vanguard.

  • BWP investors: You may wish to consider KMR. Not only does the size of the Kinder Morgan family of equities make KMR likely able to refinance more easily when needed than BWP, you also have favorable tax treatment of dividends.

    On favorable tax treatment: KMR pays its dividends in stock. Thus, one incurs no tax until and unless one sells the new stock one gets as the dividend. This is already a great benefit for KMR. If the Bush tax cuts expire, it will be even more impressive of a KMR advantage. It is true a master limited partnership like BWP often distributes by return of capital rather than dividends. But return of capital hurts you when you go to sell the master limited partnership, since your tax basis is reduced. One preserves the full tax basis of the purchase price of KMR, since the distributions by KMR are stock divdends rather than return of capital.

    You might note KMR being up 55% in a sideways market yesterday, on volume that was more than double KMR's normal volume. Also, note it was steady to up in the last hour of trading yesterday, a nice daily chart characteristic (contrast SPY yesterday, for instance).

    If you profit on KMR, please consider donating some to an effective charity. Best wishes!

  • philippians4and13 by philippians4and13 Aug 10, 2012 8:31 AM Flag

    You may wish to consider KMR. Not only does the size of the Kinder Morgan family of equities make KMR likely able to refinance more easily when needed than the typical AMJ component company, you also have potential favorable tax treatment of dividends.

    On favorable tax treatment: KMR pays its dividends in stock. Thus, one incurs no tax until and unless one sells the new stock one gets as the dividend. This is already a great benefit for KMR. If the Bush tax cuts expire, it will be even more impressive of a KMR advantage.

    You might note KMR being up 55% in a sideways market yesterday, on volume that was more than double KMR's normal volume. Also, note it was steady to up in the last hour of trading yesterday, a nice daily chart characteristic (contrast SPY yesterday, for instance).

    If you profit on KMR, please consider donating some to an effective charity. Best wishes!

  • philippians4and13 by philippians4and13 Aug 10, 2012 8:27 AM Flag

    You may wish to consider KMR. Not only does the size of the Kinder Morgan family of equities make KMR likely able to refinance more easily when needed than the typical AMJ component company, you also avoid the risk of an ETN and have potential favorable tax treatment of dividends.

    On favorable tax treatment: KMR pays its dividends in stock. Thus, one incurs no tax until and unless one sells the new stock one gets as the dividend. This is already a great benefit for KMR. If the Bush tax cuts expire, it will be even more impressive of a KMR advantage.

    On ETN risk: I am not so bold and inflammatory as to believe JP Morgan Chase will come anywhere close to going broke. But ETNs, especially until Europe gets settled and a less pro-regulaton White House emerges, are likely to be avoided by some super-cautious investors. Investors seeking high income/dividends tend to be more cautious than the average investor, so AMJ may see some disinterest because it is an ETN.

    You might note KMR being up 55% in a sideways market yesterday, on volume that was more than double KMR's normal volume. Also, note it was steady to up in the last hour of trading yesterday, a nice daily chart characteristic (contrast SPY yesterday, for instance).

    If you profit on KMR, please consider donating some to an effective charity. Best wishes!

  • Reply to

    UN down on strikes in Europe

    by twomovehigher Jan 16, 2012 10:58 PM
    philippians4and13 philippians4and13 Jan 18, 2012 10:34 AM Flag

    Actually, there are only rolling strikes, meaning, I assume, no one plant will be affected more than a day or two. Check out Reuters' story from 3 hours ago and it will confirm they are rolling strikes.

    As for the prediction UL stock price is going down, it is actually up today more than 1% and has never been down at anytime so far today.

  • This relates to UL, but you could do a similar analysis for UN: Per Yahoo Finance, as I read it, the average analyst estimates for 2012 show an increase of 14 cents per share on a base earnings for 2011 of $2.20 per share. That is growth of about 6.364% in 2012 earnings. Next, consider the dividend yield: Even at $31.55 per share price (which exceeds today's spot price), the yield is 3.9%. Add the two gets 10.26%.

    UN has a Beta, per Yahoo Finance, of 0.90 and has significant exposure to emerging markets. (UL's Beta is even less, at 0.74.)

    It appears, however, that European wows are affecting UL. UL has no connection to my knowledge to European sovereign debt. If you are looking long term and like a multinational company with low beta, emerging markets exposure and significant dividend, why not try UN or UL?

    Disclosure: My family has a very modest long position on UL, less than $6000.

  • philippians4and13 by philippians4and13 Jan 13, 2012 10:56 AM Flag

    Per Yahoo Finance, as I read it, the average analyst estimates for 2012 show an increase of 14 cents per share on a base earnings for 2011 of $2.20 per share. That is growth of about 6.364% in 2012 earnings. Next, consider the dividend yield: Even at $31.55 per share price (which exceeds today's spot price), the yield is 3.9%. Add the two gets 10.26%.

    Not bad for a stock with a Beta, per Yahoo Finance, of 0.74 and with significant exposure to emerging markets.

    It appears, however, that European wows are affecting UL. UL has no connection to my knowledge to European sovereign debt. If you are looking long term and like a multinational company with low beta, emerging markets exposure and significant dividend, why not try UL?

    Disclosure: My family has a very modest long position on UL, less than $6000.

  • PAA pays cash quarterly. EEQ pays stock dividends quarterly. Here are some comments on the differences and other aspects of EEQ and some competitors of PAA:

    A Seeking Alpha contributor today recommended EEQ and EEP. Here is an excerpt:

    "I favor Enterprise Products (EPD), Kinder Morgan (KMP) (KMR) and Enbridge Energy (EEP) (EEQ). The first 2 are the 2 largest MLPs with long track records raising distributions annually for more than 10 years. The stocks of Kinder Morgan (KMR) and Enbridge Energy (EEQ) are included for those who do not need current income, but would rather receive stock dividends which do not generate 1099s. EEP is my favorite. It brings 2/3 of the Canadian oil (Canada is the largest supplier for the U.S.) to Cushing, Oklahoma and has a substantial natural gas business centered in Oklahoma.

    Enbridge, Inc (ENB), a large Canadian energy company, is the general partner (manager of the business at EEP). During the financial meltdown in 2008, it purchased more than 16 million units of EEP at $30.76, for approximately $500 million. The investment was made to finance growth projects at EEP and give it increased participation in EEP growth. When money was not readily available, that investment was critical for the 2009 capital program at EEP. EEP expanded its Clarity natural gas pipeline and the second stage of Southern Access pipeline which was opened in April 2010. The investment doubled."

    EEQ shareholders are not subject to any Canadian tax on dividends or income, yet EEQ gives you a nice diversification of your MLP investments. If we face at least 2 more years of low interest rates, yield-hungry investors will increasingly look at MLPs and other dividend-paying assets.

    EEQ also is nice because you don't get taxed on the dividends. You are only taxed if you choose to sell shares, and that is taxed at capital gain rates, not dividend rates. Even if a surprising thing occurs and the Democrats gain Congress in 2012 and raise tax rates, you can control when you have to pay tax by deciding when to sell EEQ.

    Disclosure: I added to EEQ this week with the market down. Neither EEQ nor EEP are a large position of my overall portfolio (less than 1%).

  • BWP pays cash dividends. EEQ pays stock dividends. Here are some comments on differences of EEQ from BWP and also on some other securities in the Master Limited Partnership arena:

    A Seeking Alpha contributor today recommended EEQ. Here is an excerpt:

    "I favor Enterprise Products (EPD), Kinder Morgan (KMP) (KMR) and Enbridge Energy (EEP) (EEQ). The first 2 are the 2 largest MLPs with long track records raising distributions annually for more than 10 years. The stocks of Kinder Morgan (KMR) and Enbridge Energy (EEQ) are included for those who do not need current income, but would rather receive stock dividends which do not generate 1099s. EEP is my favorite. It brings 2/3 of the Canadian oil (Canada is the largest supplier for the U.S.) to Cushing, Oklahoma and has a substantial natural gas business centered in Oklahoma.

    Enbridge, Inc (ENB), a large Canadian energy company, is the general partner (manager of the business at EEP). During the financial meltdown in 2008, it purchased more than 16 million units of EEP at $30.76, for approximately $500 million. The investment was made to finance growth projects at EEP and give it increased participation in EEP growth. When money was not readily available, that investment was critical for the 2009 capital program at EEP. EEP expanded its Clarity natural gas pipeline and the second stage of Southern Access pipeline which was opened in April 2010. The investment doubled."

    EEQ shareholders are not subject to any Canadian tax on dividends or income, yet EEQ gives you a nice diversification of your MLP investments. If we face at least 2 more years of low interest rates, yield-hungry investors will increasingly look at MLPs and other dividend-paying assets.

    EEQ also is nice because you don't get taxed on the dividends. You are only taxed if you choose to sell shares, and that is taxed at capital gain rates, not dividend rates. Even if a surprising thing occurs and the Democrats gain Congress in 2012 and raise tax rates, you can control when you have to pay tax by deciding when to sell EEQ.

    Disclosure: I added to EEQ this week with the market down. Neither EEQ nor EEP are a large position of my overall portfolio (less than 1%).

  • philippians4and13 by philippians4and13 Apr 16, 2009 11:03 AM Flag

    Jeff Hisch of The Stock Trader's Almanac, in the last interview of him I saw transcribed, considers the time after Good Friday and Easter to generally be bearish.

    If one looks at Good Friday during a bear market year, such as 2002 or 1987, one sees the market tends to go down somewhat. The following figures are adjusted close prices per Yahoo Finance: 2002: SPY was 100.81 on Maundy Thursday (a/k/a Holy Thursday) and 98.72 12 days later. 1987: ^DJI was 2275.99 on Maundy Thursday and 2231.96 12 days later. I used 12 days later so the check date was a Tuesday.

    On a bigger theme than investing, I hope your Easter weekend was joyful and included contemplation of how needy all of us in this world are for something eternal and better.

  • philippians4and13 by philippians4and13 Feb 9, 2009 11:15 AM Flag

    The 2/2/09 hard copy issue of Forbes magazine lists 10 "honor roll" mutual funds. One on the list for 2 consecutive years is Meridian Value Fund. This is impressive, as it has delivered average annual total return of 13% from 6/30/94 through 12/31/08 and did it with no load and 1.09% expense ratio. Meridian mentioned as among its desired holdings, for its Forbes interview, KMR and 3 other companies.

    I haven't researched insider buying at KMR and KMP lately, so this post is not a strong buy recommendation by me. But I am long KMR and was glad to see Meridian liked to mention it.

  • Reply to

    anyone still here that bought in $30's ?

    by loco.legend Oct 15, 2008 11:28 AM
    philippians4and13 philippians4and13 Oct 17, 2008 3:09 PM Flag

    What is the experience with January effect for NBR? Anybody with a prediction on January effect this year or lack thereof? If so, please state your reasoning for us to consider.

    Thank you,
    Philippians

  • philippians4and13 philippians4and13 Sep 25, 2008 12:42 PM Flag

    Here is the excerpt from Stockpickr's article today. I added the brackets at beginning and end:

    [[[Part of the philosophy of Stockpickr is to follow in the footsteps of smart people. This could mean a few different things.
    First, it could mean piggybacking great investors like Warren Buffett or George Soros. Other times it means buying what the CEOs, employees and directors of a company are buying. These are people who know the intimate details of their companies far better than you or me. The perfect setup is when one of these company insiders or an entire board (in the case of a stock buyback) are buying shares at the same time that some smart savvy investors are as well. ...
    For instance, Potash (POT) is in this week's portfolio. The world's largest fertilizer producer announced that it will double its repurchase amount to about 10% of its outstanding common stock. The company has already completed the buyback of 15.82 million shares, or 5% of its stock, the limit allowed under its current normal course issuer bid. However, the company will ask the Toronto Stock Exchange to allow it to repurchase an additional 15.68 million shares, worth $2.36 billion. The buybacks have an expiration date of Jan. 30, 2009.

    "We currently have an opportunity to use our strong cash flow to re-invest in the world's best potash assets -- our own company -- at an attractive price," said Bill Doyle, PotashCorp president and CEO. "We believe our shares are significantly undervalued versus our long-term potential."

    Potash reported very impressive second-quarter earnings on July 24. As increased world grain prices boosted demand for fertilizer, Potash's profit tripled to record levels. The Canadian company earned $905.1 million, or $2.82 a share, up 217% from $285.7 million, or 88 cents a share, in the year-ago period.
    Potash said its full-year outlook is robust seeing as demand for its fertilizer is still as strong as it was in July. In July, the company said it expects full-year earnings of $12 to $13, up from the April estimate of $9.50 to $10.50.

    It's also good to see that Soleil Securities Group recently upgraded Potash from hold to buy based on attractive valuation. The shares have dropped 33% from their all-time high of $242 in the past nine weeks, and Mark Gulley from Soleil thinks investors should take advantage of the buying opportunity.

    He commented: "Grain and fertilizer demand growth is doubling from 2% to 4%, driven by: growing middle classes in developing countries that desire more grain-intensive meat and dairy in their diets, and the dire need for higher crop yield to meet the challenges of decreasing arable land, high crop prices, and low grain inventories."

    The D. E. Shaw Group is a noteworthy global investment firm that's buying Potash stock. Since its organization in 1988, the $50 billion firm has earned an international reputation for financial innovation and an extraordinarily distinguished staff. Its other top stock picks are Exxon (XOM) and Pfizer (PFE).

    We also like to see that George Soros, the founder of the Quantum Fund and one of the most successful hedge fund investors ever, is betting on Potash.]]]

  • Reply to

    SONC ratios

    by datamatters2003 Jan 2, 2008 10:35 AM
    philippians4and13 philippians4and13 Jan 2, 2008 3:38 PM Flag

    Tom Gardner, one of the Motley Fool founders, weighs in on SONC today in an internet article on three principles to find good stocks, focusing on the underlying ability of the company to compete successfully:

    "[T]he fastest route there [to stock selection success] is to understand how companies achieve competitive greatness. What are the commercial features that help their stocks rise 10, 200, or 5,000 times in value? Here are three of my favorites.

    Three principles of commercial greatness
    1. Replication. The very best public companies have a replication model that drives growth indefinitely. Consider five-year market-beating chains such as Sonic (Nasdaq: SONC), BJ's Restaurants (Nasdaq: BJRI), and GameStop (NYSE: GME)."

    Happy investing, and please remember charitable donations if you profit.

  • Reply to

    Aurora expanding?

    by mr_chapeau Jul 30, 2007 11:03 AM
    philippians4and13 philippians4and13 Jul 30, 2007 3:45 PM Flag

    Mr. C,
    Sorry, I don't know the answer to your question. You seem knowledgeable and nonbelligerent. If you would comment on any of many three questions posted earlier today, I'd appreciate it.

    Thank you.

  • philippians4and13 by philippians4and13 Jul 30, 2007 1:22 PM Flag

    1. Does anyone know where I can get info on insider transactions for POT? Because it is Canadian, Yahoo Finance does not list them and SEC filings are unhelpful. Please provide a free website if you can.

    2. Yahoo Finance does list "Top Institutional Holders" including Capital Research and Management Company. Capital was founded in California. Has it been adding to its position?

    3. What are the advantages to investing in POT.TO instead of POT? POT.TO seems to rise significantly higher on days when POT rises.

    Thank you.

  • philippians4and13 by philippians4and13 Jun 26, 2007 3:34 PM Flag

    Buckeyes,

    Here is an excerpt from my post at KMR, whose main insider is the well-regarded Richard Kinder. Does anyone know how BPL's total return tends to be during summer and until end of October?

    Just bought some more KMR last week. IMHO, it is likely to be an excellent summer stock this year. Consider:

    1. For the time frames 6/14/03 through 10/30/03, 6/15/04 through 10/30/04, 6/15/15 through 10/28/05, and 6/15/06 through 10/30/06 KMR's total returns (according to Yahoo Finance) during those times were, respectively, 6.15%, 16.83%, 9.78%, and 5.13%. These returns are NOT annualized. So you can see that, historically, KMR is a nice stock to own in the summer.

    2. This has logic as well as historical support: If the overall stock market tends to be down or sideways during the summer and early fall, an income stock like KMR will look better relative to the overall market.

    3. Test the logic on a stock like EEQ, which is similar to KMR and gives stock dividends that may appeal to equity investors who don't need cash dividends and thus normally are in the overall stock market (IOO, VTSMX, SPY, etc.) instead of in income-producing stocks. If the logic is true, EEQ should do well in the summer, also.

    Test results, per Yahoo Finance, are that EEQ has a total return during the time frames described in point 1 above of 6.44%, 8.89%, negative 3.42%, and 20.23%. So the test confirms the logic.

    4. I'm not as smart about as Richard Kinder or Parker Shaper. What are they doing? RK and Shaper each bought a significant position 6/11/07. David Kinder bought 6/12 and KMR officer James Street bought 6/11/07.

  • philippians4and13 by philippians4and13 Jun 25, 2007 7:01 PM Flag

    Just bought some more KMR last week. IMHO, it is likely to be an excellent summer stock this year. Consider:

    1. For the time frames 6/14/03 through 10/30/03, 6/15/04 through 10/30/04, 6/15/15 through 10/28/05, and 6/15/06 through 10/30/06 KMR's total returns (according to Yahoo Finance) during those times were, respectively, 6.15%, 16.83%, 9.78%, and 5.13%. These returns are NOT annualized. So you can see that, historically, KMR is a nice stock to own in the summer.

    2. This has logic as well as historical support: If the overall stock market tends to be down or sideways during the summer and early fall, an income stock like KMR will look better relative to the overall market.

    3. Test the logic on a stock like EEQ, which is similar to KMR and gives stock dividends that may appeal to equity investors who don't need cash dividends and thus normally are in the overall stock market (IOO, VTSMX, SPY, etc.) instead of in income-producing stocks. If the logic is true, EEQ should do well in the summer, also.

    Test results, per Yahoo Finance, are that EEQ has a total return during the time frames described in point 1 above of 6.44%, 8.89%, negative 3.42%, and 20.23%. So the test confirms the logic.

    4. I'm not as smart about as Richard Kinder or Parker Shaper. What are they doing? RK and Shaper each bought a significant position 6/11/07. David Kinder bought 6/12 and KMR officer James Street bought 6/11/07.

    5. What about after hours and last hour stock movement in KMR today? Last hour flat; after hours, per Yahoo Finance, KMR was up 0.55%, more than exceeding KMR's drop during today's regular trading hours.

    Make your own decision, but this is my humble opinion.