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Yahoo! Inc. (YHOO) Message Board

aalyassini 6 posts  |  Last Activity: Dec 5, 2012 12:17 AM Member since: Dec 2, 2012
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  • Reply to

    Prediction for 2013,

    by aalyassini Dec 4, 2012 6:15 PM
    aalyassini aalyassini Dec 5, 2012 12:17 AM Flag

    what are you talking about ?

  • Reply to

    Prediction for 2013,

    by aalyassini Dec 4, 2012 6:15 PM
    aalyassini aalyassini Dec 4, 2012 7:43 PM Flag

    we seem to share the same vision . Glad to hear that

  • Reply to

    Prediction for 2013,

    by aalyassini Dec 4, 2012 6:15 PM
    aalyassini aalyassini Dec 4, 2012 7:24 PM Flag

    It is a well know fact that MSFT is desperately looking for a visionary new CEO to lead the company into the 21 century and replace Palmer who has stumbled all over the place and led the company into disarray . They need a strategic catalyst, an anchor, dynamic and young CEO who understand technology, With a deal like this they will hit two birds with one stone. We already know they like to acquire Yahoo. that acquisition if it happens, well be accretive,. Who is more suited than Marissa Mayer to lead the charge before MSFT turns into another HP

  • aalyassini by aalyassini Dec 4, 2012 6:15 PM Flag

    Prediction for 2013,
    Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer will be the next Microsoft CEO in 2013 after Microsoft acquires YHOO for 35-40 .

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Reply to

    Process of Civil Law in Mexico

    by aalyassini Dec 2, 2012 1:30 PM
    aalyassini aalyassini Dec 2, 2012 1:53 PM Flag

    Remember the decision is non-final . The last paragraph iin this article (which I copied from Google search) is the most important, That is why Perhaps Yahoo was not taking it Too seriously ??

    “Based on the decision, awards are made for damages but they are mu which I copied from Google search. ch smaller. There are no special or punitive damages and each party pays their own fees and costs. Litigation is expensive, a long process and judgments are often difficult to enforce, even against a solvent defendant. Judgments can be contested in a separate “Amparo” proceeding which can take several years. An “Interlocutory Appeal” can be lodged during the proceeding which will also lengthen the process (and the cost).”

  • Civil Law in Mexico... it is by far, a less litigious society than its neighbors to the north. The rule here is that it is far better to negotiate than litigate. Here’s why.
    The Court Procedures in Mexico are very different.
    In the U.S. and Canada, the plaintiff’s lawyer files a complaint and the defendant’s lawyer files a response. The two attorneys go through the process of "discovery" and then the case is argued before a judge (and jury) using evidence and witnesses. A decision is made and “awards” are made which can be significant, including costs, damages, special damages and punitive damages.
    In Mexico, the plaintiff files a complaint providing written evidence with supporting documents and statements from witnesses. The defendant files a response, again in writing, with supporting documentation and witness statements. The judge reviews the submissions, asks for more evidence if he deems it necessary, and then renders a decision. There is no discovery process and lawyers are not allowed to be present when either party or witnesses are called in to make statements.
    Based on the decision, awards are made for damages but they are much smaller. There are no special or punitive damages and each party pays their own fees and costs.
    Litigation is expensive, a long process and judgments are often difficult to enforce, even against a solvent defendant. Judgments can be contested in a separate “Amparo” proceeding which can take several years. An “Interlocutory Appeal” can be lodged during the proceeding which will also lengthen the process (and the cost).

    Civil Law in Mexico... it is by far, a less litigious society than its neighbors to the north. The rule here is that it is far better to negotiate than litigate. Here’s why.
    The Court Procedures in Mexico are very different.
    In the U.S. and Canada, the plaintiff’s lawyer files a complaint and the defendant’s lawyer files a response. The two attorneys go through the process of "discovery" and then the case is argued before a judge (and jury) using evidence and witnesses. A decision is made and “awards” are made which can be significant, including costs, damages, special damages and punitive damages.
    In Mexico, the plaintiff files a complaint providing written evidence with supporting documents and statements from witnesses. The defendant files a response, again in writing, with supporting documentation and witness statements. The judge reviews the submissions, asks for more evidence if he deems it necessary, and then renders a decision. There is no discovery process and lawyers are not allowed to be present when either party or witnesses are called in to make statements.
    Based on the decision, awards are made for damages but they are much smaller. There are no special or punitive damages and each party pays their own fees and costs.
    Litigation is expensive, a long process and judgments are often difficult to enforce, even against a solvent defendant. Judgments can be contested in a separate “Amparo” proceeding which can take several years. An “Interlocutory Appeal” can be lodged during the proceeding which will also lengthen the process (and the cost).

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

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