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Frontline Ltd. Message Board

barbershores 177 posts  |  Last Activity: Jun 30, 2015 2:34 PM Member since: Oct 15, 2005
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  • kare11DOTKOM/story/news/local/2015/06/29/sheerwind-designs-wind-turbine-of-the-future/29450105/?utm_source=feedblitz&utm_medium=FeedBlitzRss&utm_campaign=kare/home

    Chaska company has some thoughts on the topic. I saw this a couple of years ago, it looks like they may have a commercial application soon to be commissioned.

    Couldn't cut and paste the text, so you would have to cut and paste the link into your browser and then switch out the DOTKOM.

    Best of luck,

    Barbershores

  • Reply to

    Only way is up now

    by sjt1 Jun 30, 2015 10:52 AM
    barbershores barbershores Jun 30, 2015 12:43 PM Flag

    Hi Mr. Rott,

    From the quote in your post: "The slower pace was compounded by the appearance of fresh units"
    ------------------------
    This and the impact of a dozen loaded VLCCS hitting the water if and when they are released from Iran can have a major impact on spot rates.

    The market is good for now. Take advantage of it. But, it isn't going to last. So, be ready to get out.

    Just my take.

    Best of luck,

    Barbershores

  • Reply to

    Only way is up now

    by sjt1 Jun 30, 2015 10:52 AM
    barbershores barbershores Jun 30, 2015 12:39 PM Flag

    Hi Mr. Wolf,

    From your post: " You buy when people are selling. Hold when people are buying."
    ---------------------------------------
    That doesn't work. What one needs to look for is the turn. When there is a lot of selling pressure, don't just buy into it. Wait for the turn. Let the sellers exhaust themselves. Look for capitulation.

    During the trading day, basically, for every share sold, one is buying. So, people are always selling and buying. Buying into selling pressure is suicide. Because, it can just keep being sold and the price can just keep falling.

    It's an art to find the right entry and exit. Quick witticisms such as, " You buy when people are selling. Hold when people are buying. Sell when people to tell you to buy.", doesn't cut it.

    You don't prosper by buying when there is blood in the streets. You prosper by buying when the blood in the streets ends.

    My take anyway.

    Best of luck,

    Barbershores

  • Reply to

    GNRT IPO

    by sjt1 Jun 25, 2015 2:49 PM
    barbershores barbershores Jun 26, 2015 5:10 AM Flag

    General Maritime was at one time Jim Cramer's "best of breed" ahead of both FRO and SFL, neither of which went into bankruptcy.

    Best of luck,

    Barbershores

  • Reply to

    FRO Down Because Obama Care?

    by danielchristmaslee Jun 25, 2015 2:03 PM
    barbershores barbershores Jun 26, 2015 5:04 AM Flag

    Hi Mr. Maslee,

    From your post: "This massive dip scares me!"
    ------------------------------------------
    From your post it is clear that you do not have what it takes to own individual stocks.

    You do not know if you are an investor or a trader.

    Immediately find a financial planner which will put you into the appropriate mutual funds.

    Best of luck,

    Barbershores

  • Reply to

    solar to make huge inroads

    by keembodakine Jun 23, 2015 2:54 PM
    barbershores barbershores Jun 24, 2015 11:37 PM Flag

    Here's an article I consider good. Good because it explains things that aren't generally understood.

    I think it better to look at the practical realities of all the sources of energy, and the complications of the mix than just cheerleading the ones that seem cool.

    voxDOTKOM/2015/6/24/8837293/economic-limitations-wind-solar

    But that's just me.

    Best of luck,

    Barbershores

  • Reply to

    solar to make huge inroads

    by keembodakine Jun 23, 2015 2:54 PM
    barbershores barbershores Jun 24, 2015 11:08 PM Flag

    From the article: "That's not enough to prevent the surface of the Earth from heating more than 2 degrees Celsius, according to BNEF. That's considered the point-of-no-return for some worst consequences of climate change. "
    ---------------------------------------------------------
    In order to "end" global warming, we have to virtually end all combustion of so called fossil fuels. Cutting 1%, 10%, 50% won't cut it.
    We would have to cut something greater than 99.9%.

    So, the 2 degrees Celsius target is just a pipe dream.

    Actually, the problem is much greater than that. All the added people exhaling since the year 1800, and cattle, and this and that, adds heat to the environment and/or further increases the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

    So, there is no stopping a 2 degree Celsius rise. Or a 3, or 4, or even 10. All we can do is slightly alter the amount of time "until" it happens.

    Solar and alternatives "are" going to rise. We didn't need this article to know this.

    Natural gas isn't a very effective bridge fuel. We already knew this.

    Nothing new here, basically an opinion piece. It misses the scale of the problem just like all the others.

    Just my take.

    Best of luck,

    Barbershores

  • barbershores barbershores Jun 23, 2015 7:24 PM Flag

    Here's an article about going off grid with solar in Hawaii. I found it very interesting.

    marketwatchDOTKOM/story/what-its-like-to-use-an-off-grid-solar-and-battery-system-in-your-home-2015-06-22?siteid=yhoof2

    "Prices vary, but Stevens says a solar-and-battery system big enough to power a typical Hawaiian home can cost around $32,000. That’s only about $2,000 more than a more common grid-connected solar setup. Competition among installers is lowering costs of off-grid systems, Stevens said.

    Rule of thumb: Hawaiian homeowners recover the costs of their off-grid systems after about five years — but the systems themselves last 20 to 25 years. With current technology, the batteries might need to be swapped out after 10 or 15 years, Stevens says. But the bottom line is that after five years, homeowners are powering their homes for free.
    "
    -------------------------------
    No mention of air conditioning or heat. Does anybody heat in Hawaii? ever? Also, they use propane to heat their water. Why not a passive solar water heating system?
    Special DC applicance costs apparently are not included.

    But, it looks like there is tremendous potential.

    If, I could get an off the grid system in NH which would run all my appliances, my hot water, my heat, at a cost equal to my current costs, and have it all paid for in 5 years, so the next 10-20 years old would be close to free, I would do it in a heart beat.

    In Hawaii, adding $32,000 or so to the cost of a new home would probably be fairly insignificant.

    For the average home in New Hampshire that would be a lot. But, the cost to do what I would want would be something probably well over $100,000.

  • barbershores barbershores Jun 23, 2015 6:46 PM Flag

    Another article about how cold our winter was:

    businessinsiderDOTKOM/lobster-prices-are-on-the-rise-2015-6

    This year the price of lobster is going up thanks to changing water temperatures, experts have told Business Insider.

    A lot of the lobsters people buy come from New England — specifically the Gulf of Maine, which produces 94% of America's lobsters. And lobsters for the most part are harvested only after they have grown and shed their shells. But changing ocean temperatures over the past few years have messed with when lobsters molt.

    Basically, warmer water makes them molt earlier in the year, and back in 2012 New England's ocean was relatively warm thanks to an "ocean heat wave" that hit much of the East Coast, according to University of Maine research professor Richard Wahle.

    This meant lobsters matured earlier in the year, making them ready for the summer fishing season.

    Fisherman caught so many lobsters that prices per pound plummeted to the lowest they had been since the 1930s:

  • Reply to

    OT BS Feeling even more paranoid lately?

    by barbershores Apr 17, 2015 4:40 AM
    barbershores barbershores Jun 22, 2015 2:41 PM Flag

    The government has been caught stealing raisins.

    news.yahooDOTKOM/high-court-strikes-down-raisin-program-unconstitutional-142418972--finance.html

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court ruled Monday that a 66-year-old program that lets the government take raisins away from farmers to help reduce supply and boost market prices is unconstitutional.

    In an 8-1 ruling, the justices said forcing raisin growers to give up part of their annual crop without full payment is an illegal confiscation of private property.

    The ruling is a victory for California farmers Marvin and Laura Horne, who claimed they were losing money under a 1940s-era program they call outdated and ineffective. They were fined $695,000 for trying to get around the program.

    A federal appeals court said the program was acceptable because the farmers benefited from higher market prices and didn't lose the entire value of their crop.

    The government argued that the Hornes benefited from increased raisin prices, but their cause had won wide support from conservative groups opposed to government action that infringes on private property righ

  • Reply to

    OT BS Feeling even more paranoid lately?

    by barbershores Apr 17, 2015 4:40 AM
    barbershores barbershores Jun 22, 2015 10:42 AM Flag

    How good is it for the government to know lots and lots about you personally?

    ijreviewDOTKOM/2015/06/348713-chinese-computer-hackers-harming-americas-military-advantage/?utm_source=email&utm_campaign=morning-newsletter&utm_medium=owned

    China May Have Access to Files on 14 Million Americans — And It Gets Worse the More We Learn

    Authorities believe the hackers stole millions of copies of Standard Form 86, a deeply personal form over 120 pages long where applicants disclose drug and alcohol use, history of mental illnesses, foreign contacts, and even personal information about family and friends.

  • barbershores barbershores Jun 21, 2015 4:42 PM Flag

    Summer of 13, it was freaking hot here in the lakes region of NH. Not only hot, of course not hot compared to Phoenix or Austin, but wicked humid too. From that, I air conditioned barbershores the house. Around 2001 when I first started renting it out by the week during the summer, when I researched my direct competition, I found that around 15% of those homes had air conditioning. So, I didn't bother. But, back then, there were only maybe 3 or 4 evenings/nights/summer in which it didn't cool off and the humidity fell off. We filled most the summer with rentals so why make a costly change? 2006 was our best summer. Rented out 11 weeks, plus, I rented the house to a friend that managed to burn his home down getting his vintage carmen ghia ready for the sandwich fair. That was a great ilncome year. Every year since then, we rented fewer and fewer weeks. The great recession/depression had something to do with it. 2013 was wicked hot, and we only rented out 5 weeks. I was dissatisfied. I researched our direct competition again, and found that 80-85% of our competition now had air conditioning. So, for 2014, we were air conditioned, and we rented out 8 weeks. Of course, it was cold as can be, and we didn't actually need it, but, the additional 3 weeks almost paid for the electrical upgrade, two Mitsubishi mini splits, and two 50 gallon vapor compression water heaters plus the dock and landscaping. This year, we are booked out at 9 1/2 weeks. I spent less than 1 weeks worth of income in upgrades this year. I might pick up one more week of rental, we shall see. First renters arrived today. I am afraid they may be freeing to death. LOL. It's been very cool. 60ish high today. Tomorrow maybe 79 though, but low 70s the rest of the week. This year so far appears to be setting up like 2001 and 2014 so far. Coming off the coldest Winter since I have been in NH.

    Best of luck,

    Barbershores

  • Reply to

    Monday sell off

    by rami36 Jun 13, 2015 9:34 AM
    barbershores barbershores Jun 21, 2015 4:22 PM Flag

    This hasn't been successful to post a chart here for some time, but I shall try.

    Here are the major points I see on FRO:

    s774.photobucketDOTKOM/user/barbershores/media/FRO%20CHART%206-12-15.png.html

  • Reply to

    OT BS Feeling even more paranoid lately?

    by barbershores Apr 17, 2015 4:40 AM
    barbershores barbershores Jun 21, 2015 3:51 PM Flag

    Hi Mr. Rogere,

    It looks to me like you are perfectly happy to have the government listen into your phone conversations. And, having others hack into them must be ok too. You being such a flaming liberal, you probably felt pretty confident when the dems had the house and the senate. But, with the repubs in charge there now, responsible to oversee such things, doesn't that make you a bit concerned?

    Unfortunately, like it or not, admit it or not, America is becoming a more political place. We have much evidence that political parties will harm those that don't agree with them, or vote their way.

    Some may feel comfy and confident to have the government listening in thinking that it makes them safer, but what I see is even more potential for destructive political acts perpetrated on the America people by the government.

    I don't like or trust either party. So long as we have special interest groups such as the demreps calling the shots, I shan't trust the government.

    Hey, the president said I could keep my doctor, and that I could keep my insurance. Then, I was cancelled as a direct result of government aggression. With this personal experience, it's pretty easy to see that they will lie and cheat and cause harm to American citizens to get what they want, all in the name of protecting us of course.

    Some, simply can't see it.

    Today, what's illegal is legal, and what is legal is illegal. The government just enforces which laws they wish, and ignores the one's that don't support their agenda.

    In this environment, yeah, I don't want the government eavesdropping on my conversations. They could very well take what I say out of context, or simply lie about what I have said. Those of low moral standards will do such a thing.

    The repubs are boss right now. You might be better off hunkering down.

    Best of luck,

    Barbershores

  • Reply to

    Monday sell off

    by rami36 Jun 13, 2015 9:34 AM
    barbershores barbershores Jun 21, 2015 3:37 PM Flag

    Hi Mr. Rami,

    Cut and pasting of your post:
    "rami36 • Jun 13, 2015 9:34 AM Flag

    Monday sell off
    who was dumping all those shares Friday? Perhaps expecting news Monday morning"
    ----------------------------
    If I am reading this right, you were posting about Friday June 12th, 2015. Is that right?

    Looking at a chart, that was a big up day. Big volume too. On that day, it gapped down at the open, ran down to the 50dsma, then ran up to a high for the last 2 weeks.

    Are we both talking about the same day? Since then, it has pulled back but is currently supporting at and sitting on the 50dsma. Is that a bearish indication to you? It looks bullish to me, until it busts below the 50 anyway.

    Best of luck,

    Barbershores

  • Reply to

    OT BS Feeling even more paranoid lately?

    by barbershores Apr 17, 2015 4:40 AM
    barbershores barbershores Jun 20, 2015 10:26 PM Flag

    Here's an article about those fake cell towers being found all over.

    gizmodoDOTKOM/how-a-jailbird-con-artist-uncovered-a-secret-fbi-survei-1712559742

    A convict lawyer, sitting in jail, obsessed with a wacky theory that the government tracked him by sending secret rays into his house... ends up discovering a secret government cell phone tracking program. Sounds like bizarre noir, right? But it’s true.

    It happened to Daniel Rigmaiden, who found out that the government had used Stingrays—covert surveillance devices that act like a fake cell phone towers—to catch him running a fake tax return scheme. He’s the guy who brought Stingrays to light. Rigmaiden dug through government documents and discovered that law enforcement all over the country were using these devices, and he did it from his jail cell. Then, he wrote a meticulously researched memo about the secret program that tipped off the American Civil Liberties Union.

  • barbershores barbershores Jun 19, 2015 11:15 AM Flag

    Hi Mr. Rott,

    There are multiple causes of inflation. When we have had the most extreme cases of "runaway" inflation here in the US, it is during periods that US labor became so tight, that in order for companies to hire new employees, they had to lure them from other employers using higher wages as the carrot. This has a tendency to get out of hand. When a company loses employees because others are paying more, they must increase the pay for new hires necessary to replace them. Plus, to hold onto existing labor they must give them higher wages too, so lots of raises come into play. The added cost of labor translates into higher manufacturing or service costs, so firms must charge more for their products, driving up the cost of goods

    Here's the thing. Yes, one could raise the minimum wage during periods of low labor demand without sparking "runaway" inflation. However, it would still raise the cost of goods sold. Sold here, and sold overseas too. It would put America in a less competitive position for selling products overseas, and those sales would fall.

    With higher costs for goods in the US, fewer of them would be consumed, so fewer US made goods would be purchased. With fewer US made goods being sold in the US and overseas, less labor would be required to make products.

    Net effect is that those in the lowest rung of wage rates would make more money, fewer Americans would be working, more people would have to get government assistance, so taxes would have to be raised or the national debt would have to go up even more. This is dedrater. It doesn't even cause the end to be more fair, because the reality is that a person is better off working and making less money, than being out of work getting government assistance of even less money.

    In my opinion, the best approach for all of America is to make manufacturing and services here "more" competitive, and put "more" people to work.

    Just my take.

    Best of luck,

    Barbershores

  • barbershores barbershores Jun 19, 2015 10:57 AM Flag

    Hi Mr. Rott,

    From your post: "I don't hire day laborers but know folks who do.. I'm told they're getting $100/day plus lunch and transport."
    -------------------------
    Yeah, $100/day for 8 hours would be $12.50/hour towards the bottom of the range I offered of 12 to 15. Lunch and transport has some value, but it is in the range.

    Let me explain my point a bit more. Fast food, kitchen help, retail sales, cashiers, shelf stockers, tends to be priced around minimum wage if there is no excess demand for labor in these areas. Currently in NH that's $7.25/hour. A company will pay more if they find they need to to attract and keep good dependable labor. Nobody is paying only $7.25 for labor in the lakes region of NH in the summer. But, this is the starting rate. Even with a minimum wage, supply and demand factor into it. None of the people, real US citizens anyway, employed in landscaping, logging, lot clearing, hauling trash, or other job is only making $7.25/ hour. They are all making more. There is a tier of labor which makes up the prevailing wage for non professional hard working outdoors men. This is the $12 to $15 range I spoke of. If somebody in New Hampshire, and apparently in California too, is looking to hire this kind of labor, that is the wage they would have to pay. If they get someone cheaper, that individual is not likely to stick with the job because they would likely find other work that pays more. So to get any kind of stability one would have to pay 12 to 15 bucks. Yeah, if you are supplying lunch and transportation, probably at the lower end of the range. If the guy brings his own lunch, a pickup, a chainsaw with gas and oil, right at the top.

    Now then, when the minimum wage is increased to $15/hour, what happens to this "day labor" tier? What happens when a guy that was making $12.50 logging, can now make $15 behind the counter of a convenience store? I expect that this is the where the market distortions will be most apparent.BS

  • Reply to

    1.2 millioon premature deaths

    by lakeed98 Jun 16, 2015 12:58 PM
    barbershores barbershores Jun 17, 2015 9:15 PM Flag

    Hi Mr. Dan,

    From your post: "The only reason a child would starve in the USA is if the *parent* does not step up and ask the community for help if help is needed. "
    -------------------------
    In my community, Lots of snap cards are being used, and we now have 4 food pantries. I can't count the number of "tons" of food I have delivered to my community from the food bank in Manchester. A typical run in my dodge grand caravan is 1,100 lbs. Most of their food comes delivered from the USDA program. Also, once a week a community service org has a free dinner at a local church. I am part of a group that is distributing free lunches for kids in the local schools this summer. Get this, the logic goes like this, during the school year, the needy kids get free breakfasts and lunches at the schools. But when school is out for summer, they don't have access to those free school lunches. So, we pack up a weeks worth of lunches, and deliver them to the home of any family that asks for each kid. I volunteered to be a driver, but apparently they already have enough drivers, so I will be stuck packing paper bags. The program starts next week when the kids are out of school. This should be interesting.

    Best of luck,

    Barbershores

  • barbershores barbershores Jun 17, 2015 8:58 PM Flag

    It only costs more.

    Continued from previous post.

    Five more points:

    1. If I could do it, I would. If I can save myself serious money, by investing in a PV plant in my house. It is not a moral issue at all. It is purely an economic issue. I think it is great that you have done it. I would love to hear that you have purchased an electric car and charge it off your PV system, and that you save scads of money doing it. That's middle class capitalism using technology at it's finest.

    2. Adding home owner power plants increases the total "cost" of electrical power in an area. This burdens other taxpayers that are subsidizing your investment. This burdens other non solar energy using neighbors subsidizing your grid access costs. I personally don't care. If the government wants others to pay your electric costs, it is in your best interests to play their game.

    3. Economically, home PV solar power is a big loser today. To individuals properly playing the game, they can reduce their costs. But, it is an economic loser in total. Somebody has to pay for it. But the government is just moving that cost to others.

    4. Without adequate storage, or adequate non carbon producing base grid power, we will never reduce our carbon generation down to the point that we can stop carbon dioxide from increasing in the atmosphere.

    5. Another solution to the problem would be a carbon free base power system powering the grid. Some form of nuclear, or even geothermal maybe. If something develops that can do this, all these homeowner PV power systems will become merely costly redundancies. But, that's not going to happen for a long time. But eventually, I think it likely.

    Best of luck,

    Barbershores

FRO
2.37-0.05(-2.07%)Jul 7 4:01 PMEDT