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baxterjames120 312 posts  |  Last Activity: 8 hours ago Member since: Dec 5, 2009
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  • Dow will drop another 50 points in the next 10 minutes and the SPY will continue to sell off AH

  • I always sell the day before earnings release. good news/bad news it doesn't matter. Sell on the news is right 90% of the time.

  • watch the Ebola stocks move in AH

  • baxterjames120 baxterjames120 Oct 21, 2014 8:28 AM Flag

    If this is absolutely true- IBIO wins no matter what. Anyone using plant technology has to use IBIO technology and therefore royalties or some other manner of compensation to IBIO is a given

    Any company manufacturing ZMapp in plants with the technology used for its non-human primate testing will require a U.S. patent license from iBio to avoid patent infringement. Other licenses may also be required.
    •iBio and Caliber Biotherapeutics have an existing agreement whereby iBio has provided an antibody product-specific commercial license to Caliber that can be augmented to provide freedom to operate in the manufacture of ZMapp. iBio has exclusive rights to certain patented technologies developed by its existing collaborator, Novici Biotech, that are proven to increase the expression yield of recombinant proteins and thereby increase the number of doses that can be manufactured in a given time frame.
    •BARDA was provided detailed information on these relationships, patents, and technologies during the drafting of the task order. iBio has been unable to comment in any further detail, except to provide the following background information and to observe that substantial, Ebola-specific work has been under way by several parties relevant to the emergency response to the Ebola outbreak, including iBio, since much earlier in its spread.

  • baxterjames120 baxterjames120 Oct 21, 2014 8:25 AM Flag

    Yes- it is reiterated in an article just out on SA a few minutes ago. Thanks for rebutting AF's BS

    BARDA Task Order for ZMapp Production
    •Late Thursday evening, October 16, 2014 the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) within the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued a "task order" to three Centers for Innovation in Advanced Development and Manufacturing (CIADM) for proposals on large scale production of the experimental plant-made antibody drug, ZMapp.
    •The three CIADMs are public-private partnerships the members of which, in each case, include both corporations and universities. Only the three CIADMs, all of which have existing contracts with BARDA, are eligible to respond directly to this request from BARDA.
    •Although BARDA may have the legal authority to contract directly with individual corporations, no individual companies are eligible to respond to this task order.
    •However, none of the three CIADMs have the technology or facilities to manufacture antibodies in plants; and, therefore, the successful bidder will be required to subcontract the operational work under the task order to one or more companies with the necessary technology and/or facilities.
    •Any company manufacturing ZMapp in plants with the technology used for its non-human primate testing will require a U.S. patent license from iBio to avoid patent infringement. Other licenses may also be required.
    •iBio and Caliber Biotherapeutics have an existing agreement whereby iBio has provided an antibody product-specific commercial license to Caliber that can be augmented to provide freedom to operate in the manufacture of ZMapp. iBio has exclusive rights to certain patented technologies developed by its existing collaborator, Novici Biotech, that are proven to increase the expression yield of recombinant proteins and thereby increase the number of doses that can be manufactured in a given time frame.
    •BARDA was provided detailed information on these relationships, patents, and technologies during the drafting of the task order. iBio has been unable to comment in any further detail, except to provide the following background information and to observe that substantial, Ebola-specific work has been under way by several parties relevant to the emergency response to the Ebola outbreak, including iBio, since much earlier in its spread.

    Plant-Made Pharmaceutical Facilities

    There are four facilities in the U.S. capable of producing clinical quantities of plant-made proteins for vaccine or therapeutic purposes. These include
    •The world's largest plant-made pharmaceutical facility completed in March 2011, owned by Caliber Biotherapeutics LLC in Bryan, Texas, built largely with U.S. Department of Defense (NYSEARCA:DOD) funding following the success of iBioLaunch technology tests conducted for the DoD by Fraunhofer under license from iBio.
    •A pilot facility owned by the Fraunhofer USA Center for Molecular Biotechnology in Newark, Delaware and operated under license from iBio (configured primarily for vaccine products at the current time with limited total capacity for therapeutic antibody production).
    •A facility owned by Medicago (now a subsidiary of Mitsubishi) that was expanded with DoD funding in 2011 and is currently configured primarily for virus-like-particle (NYSE:VLP) vaccine manufacturing.
    •A facility owned by Kentucky Bioprocessing (now a subsidiary of a unit of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company) and configured for production of vaccines and therapeutics for phase 1 clinical trials (the capacity of which is now fully utilized for production of the ZMapp product for a phase 1 clinical trial)

    iBio has provided a license to Frauhofer and to Caliber for use of its technology for specific purposes. The existing Collaboration and License Agreement between iBio and Caliber provides rights to Caliber on a product-by-product basis in exchange for commercial consideration including royalties on end product sales. The first announced product designation under this agreement is an antibody-related protein for an oncology application.

    iBio has agreed, at the appropriate time, to augment its agreement with Caliber to provide Caliber with the right to manufacture the ZMapp antibodies under iBio patents.

    Any other manufacturer who desires to manufacture ZMapp antibodies in plants, as previously described in scientific publications by Mapp Biopharmaceutical, will require a commercial license from iBio, and iBio has offered to grant such licenses to parties designated by BARDA as appropriate.

    Technology for production of the ZMapp product
    •ZMapp antibodies, as produced and tested in non-human primates and as sought for emergency human use by BARDA, depend on access to the intellectual property of several companies.
    •The plant expression vector technology for antibody development in plants used by Mapp was obtained under a research license from Icon Genetics AG; however, issued U.S. patents owned by iBio dominate the Icon technology.
    •Therefore, to avoid patent infringement in the U.S. any manufacturer of the ZMapp product, unless the production process is degraded to using public domain methods alone, will require a commercial license from iBio.
    •Manufacturers of ZMapp may also require a commercial license from Icon for the use of that company's proprietary technology even though it falls under the claims of certain iBio patents.
    •To the extent specific transgenic host plants owned by Icon are used during manufacturing, a license from Icon may be required.
    •Of equal importance to the platform technology for antibody production is the urgent need to increase the expression yield of one or more of the antibody components of the ZMapp cocktail, and iBio has exclusive rights to technology proven uniquely effective by Novici Biotech LLC in significantly increasing protein expression yield without altering the structural or functional properties of the protein. This technology is directly and rapidly applicable to increasing the yield of ZMapp antibodies.

  • Guess people realize AF articles are worthless

  • Overview and Investment Perspective

    In a hard hitting article, the Washington Post has called for an investigation into potential stock manipulation by short sellers of NWBO and other emerging biotechnology companies. The Post suggests that there may be a wide spread criminal conspiracy that has victimized these companies and their investors. The Post also focuses on the prominent role of Adam Feuerstein in this situation. Later in this report, I include the complete text of the Post or it can be accessed at this link.

    The Washington Post article follows on the heels of a white paper on July 29, 2014 from the Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics (CREW), an influential Washington blog that requested the Securities and Exchange Commission investigate possible illegal manipulation of stock prices and questioned the role of Adam Feuerstein. Then on August 18, 2014 the New Media Journal published a blog called “When Wall Street Greed Kills”. Once again this article zeroed in on the alleged short selling scheme and the potential role of Feuerstein.

    Small biotechnology companies and investors have been clamoring for years that short sellers are manipulating the prices of emerging biotechnology stocks. This has largely fallen on deaf ears as the SEC has taken no action. However, it appears that the heat has now been turned up. The Washington Post is one of the most prominent newspapers in America and highly influential in Washington. Its most famous investigational reporting piece was about Watergate and it carries great prestige. Securities regulators, politicians and law enforcement agencies are likely to be prompted by this article. It could also trigger wide spread media investigations.

    The most damning evidence against Feuerstein comes from his boss Jim Cramer. In an interview which I include in its entirety later in this report, Cramer describes how he manipulated stocks and broke securities laws when he ran his hedge fund. He recommends that all hedge fund managers do this because it is fun and profitable and they probably won’t get caught. Yes, he actually said this. The techniques that Cramer describes are consistent with the articles that Feuerstein writes.

    If hedge funds are indeed collaborating in a stock manipulation scheme, they are now faced with the probability of possible SEC and Congressional investigations accompanied by an FBI probe and media digging. For the first time, they could be facing investigations from institutions with subpoena powers. If there is coordinated trading and naked shorting and fomenting by friendly bloggers as has been alleged, it will be discovered. If the Post is correct, we may be in the early days in an intensive Watergate like investigation that could expose a criminal enterprise of vast proportions.

    The tag line for this investigation could very well be that a band of rapacious hedge funds are manipulating the prices of small companies trying to develop treatments for cancer, swindling small investors out of hundreds of millions of dollars and blocking treatment of patients from potential cancer drug breakthroughs. This is a compelling story for any politician or regulator and could be especially the case for politicians with enmity to Wall Street such as Senator Elizabeth Warren, not to mention Attorney General Eric Holder.

    So what are the stock market implications? If indeed there is ultimately shown to be a criminal conspiracy, how bold will the hedge funds be in the interim. Nothing in the past has had any effect on their behavior and perhaps this will also be the case with the Washington Post article. Moreover, there is no objective evidence that I am aware of that comes together to prove a criminal plot. The evidence, however powerful, is circumstantial. If the hedge funds are confident that they are acting legally, nothing will change in their conduct.

    However, if there are guilty consciences, we may see a sharp reduction in their shorting activity and possibly some could begin to unwind their short positions. This could create an enormous short squeeze in the case of Northwest Biotherapeutics where there are 8 million legitimate shorts and an estimated 4 million or more naked shorts. The effective public float of the Company after subtracting out management and closely held shares could be about 20 million shares. If the shorts begin to panic, we could see a short squeeze of enormous proportions.

    You can follow comments on the Washington Post article on this link. So far, they have been overwhelmingly supportive and appreciative of the Post article and there is an overwhelming consensus that there appears to be manipulative stock trading practices on the part of hedge funds.

  • Reply to

    The Street Article

    by karenoconnell_2000 Oct 20, 2014 8:15 PM
    baxterjames120 baxterjames120 Oct 20, 2014 9:11 PM Flag

    And the media fails to mention that Ebola is increasing exponentially in Africa and it is now completely our of control. Buy hey- not our problem right. Let them figure it out. Ebola is here to stay.

  • Lagos, a city of 17 million people and woeful medical care. did they ask everyone if they are feeling OK today. Unbelievable hubris. We will look back on this "whistling past the graveyard" reaction as a terrible mistake.

  • Reply to

    Ebola is far from over people

    by dg41510 Oct 20, 2014 8:38 PM
    baxterjames120 baxterjames120 Oct 20, 2014 8:59 PM Flag

    U.S. Government -"nothing to see here folks now just move along..."

    At 3:30 a.m. in the world’s biggest Ebola treatment center, Daniel Lucey found the outbreak reduced to its essentials: patients lying on mattresses on the floor and vomiting in the dark, visible only by the wavering flashlight beam of a single volunteer doctor.

    “I don’t see a light at the end of the tunnel,” said Lucey, a physician and professor from Georgetown University who is halfway through a five-week tour in Liberia with Medecins Sans Frontieres, the medical charity known in English as Doctors Without Borders. “The epidemic is still getting worse,” he said by phone between shifts.

    That’s an increasingly urgent challenge for MSF and the global health community. As fear spreads in the U.S. over transmission of the virus to two nurses in a modern Dallas hospital, the main fight against the outbreak is still being waged by volunteers like Lucey half a world away.

    Related:
    jDallas Says 48 to Be Cleared of Ebola Infection Risk
    jNigeria Free of Ebola as WHO Says Virus Can Be Contained

    MSF has been the first -- and often only -- line of defense against Ebola in West Africa. The group raised the alarm on March 31, months ahead of the World Health Organization. Now, after treating almost a third of the roughly 9,000 confirmed Ebola cases in Africa -- and faced with a WHO warning of perhaps 10,000 new infections a week by December -- MSF is reaching its limits.

    Photographer: John Moore/Getty Images

    A doctor outside the JFK Ebola treatment center speaks to journalists on Oct. 13, 2014... Read More

    “They are at the breaking point,” said Vinh-Kim Nguyen, a professor at the School of Public Health at the University of Montreal who has volunteered for a West African tour with MSF in a few weeks. MSF has already seen 21 workers infected and 12 people die, and “there’s a sense that there’s a major wave of infections that’s about to wash everything away,” Nguyen said.

    Biafra War

    The story of how a relatively small, decentralized group like MSF came to lead the response to the world’s biggest outbreak of Ebola began 43 years ago in Paris. Alarmed by war and famine in the Nigerian secessionist state of Biafra, 13 doctors and journalists created an emergency medical response organization that could work around the world.

    The Ebola Scourge »

    The founders imagined a global version of France’s emergency medicine system, according to Peter Redfield, a professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill who published a 2013 book about MSF. The group has since opened offices in 28 countries, and in 1999 it won a Nobel Peace Prize. The money was used to study neglected diseases.

    “They have 40 years of experience dealing with the kind of situation they’re in now,” said Renee Fox, an emeritus professor of sociology at the University of Pennsylvania who published her own book about MSF this year.

    Photographer: Pascal Guyot/AFP via Getty Images

    Medical staff members burn clothes belonging to patients suffering from Ebola, at the... Read More

    MSF views part of its job as “temoignage,” or bearing witness to injustice, Fox said. The organization has clashed with global pharmaceutical companies over the price of medication in developing countries, and this year it spoke out about chemical weapons attacks in Syria. In West Africa, it called for a broader global response before the WHO was willing to acknowledge an emergency existed.

    “People did not listen,” Fox said.

    WHO Director-General Margaret Chan said in an Oct. 17 interview that the agency’s response may not have matched the scale and complexity of the outbreak.

    Lassa Fever

    MSF was already in Guinea when the Ebola outbreak began. A Swiss team doing malaria control in the town of Gueckedou, near the borders with Liberia and Sierra Leone, got a letter from Guinea’s Ministry of Health on March 12 detailing an illness that had struck eight people, including a doctor who died after caring for a patient from Gueckedou. MSF dispatched researchers to take blood samples, case histories and symptoms, according to Hugues Robert-Nicoud, an MSF emergency program manager.

    Photographer: John Moore/Getty Images

    Family members peer into a bedroom as the body of a man awaits the arrival of an Ebola... Read More

    They initially suspected Lassa fever, a disease common in the region. It took a week to organize safe transportation of the blood samples, first to the Guinean capital in Conakry and then to European labs. On March 21, the Pasteur Institute in Lyon, France, said the mystery disease might be either Ebola or Marburg, a similar virus.

    Sinking Boat

    “I dropped my pen and thought, ’This is trouble,’” Robert-Nicoud said. The lab confirmed the worst: Ebola.

    On March 23, the WHO posted the confirmation on its website. A week later, MSF issued a statement citing eight cases in Conakry and calling the outbreak unprecedented. The WHO didn’t declare Ebola an international public health emergency until Aug. 8, more than four months after MSF’s warning.

    In March and April, MSF was able to follow patients and everyone they had come in contact with, what’s known as contact tracing. While MSF has sent almost 300 foreigners to West Africa to fight the epidemic, and has hired about 3,000 locals, it can no longer do effective contact tracing due to the exponential rise in cases, Robert-Nicoud said.

    “There’s a change of scale in this epidemic every two weeks,” he said.

    When he was in Monrovia at the end of September, Robert-Nicoud said the ministry of health told him there were only 12 ambulances to serve a city of 1 million people, where traffic jams can delay delivery of patients to treatment centers by two hours.

    Sinking Feeling

    “It’s this constant feeling that the boat’s sinking,” Robert-Nicoud said. “You try to plug the water that’s coming in, but the holes are everywhere.”

    Meanwhile, the treatment centers promised by leaders in the U.S. and Europe have been slow to materialize, and little has been said of medical personnel to staff them. About 500 of the 4,000 U.S. military personnel authorized for the mission are now in Liberia to build at least 17 100-bed treatment centers, provide logistics and train health workers, the Pentagon said today.

    The U.S. has so far committed to sending 65 medical staff from the Department of Health and Human Services who will provide direct patient care at a 25-bed hospital in Monrovia dedicated to treating infected health workers. The facility is scheduled to be completed by Nov. 5, said Pentagon spokesman Army Colonel Steve Warren.

    Cuba has sent 165 health professionals to Sierra Leone, and China is providing 174 medical staff in the same country, according to the WHO. While more than 600 U.K. National Health Service staff have volunteered to head to Sierra Leone, it’s still unclear how many will be deployed.

    In Monrovia, Georgetown volunteer Lucey’s Elwa3 Hospital consists of 10 tents, stifling in the tropical heat, with corridors of orange netting separating the definitely sick from suspected cases, the dangerous from the safe.

    Some 600 Liberian citizens work with a rotating team of international doctors, nurses and logistics experts. Still, the enveloping suits required to protect caregivers from infection are so hot that doctors must limit their shifts to just 45 minutes.

    Lucey said MSF doctors rely instead on recovering patients for help. Infected adults care for other people’s children; one 20-year-old man took over diaper changes for a sick three-month-old.

    “Every day we have deaths,” Lucey said. “Every morning you get up at 6 a.m., go to sleep at 11 p.m. Meetings in the morning and meetings at night, and you work, work, work until you can’t work anymore. Then you get up in the morning and do it again.”

  • Reply to

    Ebola is far from over people

    by dg41510 Oct 20, 2014 8:38 PM
    baxterjames120 baxterjames120 Oct 20, 2014 8:57 PM Flag

    You got that right. We are in the proverbial eye of the hurricane, the calm before the storm. Read this and tell me Ebola is contained and under control. Not so if you live in the Western Hemisphere!!

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    Ebola Doctors at Breaking Point: 'This Constant Feeling That the Boat's Sinking'


    By Makiko Kitamura and Naomi Kresge Oct 20, 2014 12:23 PM CT 122 Comments Email Print

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    Oct. 20 (Bloomberg) -- Bloomberg’s Shelby Holliday reports on drug maker interest in developing an Ebola vaccines and therapies. She speaks on “Bloomberg Surveillance.” (Source: Bloomberg)




    Related
    j !Inovio CEO Sees Ebola Vaccine Human Trial Within Months

    At 3:30 a.m. in the world’s biggest Ebola treatment center, Daniel Lucey found the outbreak reduced to its essentials: patients lying on mattresses on the floor and vomiting in the dark, visible only by the wavering flashlight beam of a single volunteer doctor.

    “I don’t see a light at the end of the tunnel,” said Lucey, a physician and professor from Georgetown University who is halfway through a five-week tour in Liberia with Medecins Sans Frontieres, the medical charity known in English as Doctors Without Borders. “The epidemic is still getting worse,” he said by phone between shifts.

    That’s an increasingly urgent challenge for MSF and the global health community. As fear spreads in the U.S. over transmission of the virus to two nurses in a modern Dallas hospital, the main fight against the outbreak is still being waged by volunteers like Lucey half a world away.

    Related:
    jDallas Says 48 to Be Cleared of Ebola Infection Risk
    jNigeria Free of Ebola as WHO Says Virus Can Be Contained

    MSF has been the first -- and often only -- line of defense against Ebola in West Africa. The group raised the alarm on March 31, months ahead of the World Health Organization. Now, after treating almost a third of the roughly 9,000 confirmed Ebola cases in Africa -- and faced with a WHO warning of perhaps 10,000 new infections a week by December -- MSF is reaching its limits.


    Photographer: John Moore/Getty Images

    A doctor outside the JFK Ebola treatment center speaks to journalists on Oct. 13, 2014... Read More

    “They are at the breaking point,” said Vinh-Kim Nguyen, a professor at the School of Public Health at the University of Montreal who has volunteered for a West African tour with MSF in a few weeks. MSF has already seen 21 workers infected and 12 people die, and “there’s a sense that there’s a major wave of infections that’s about to wash everything away,” Nguyen said.

    Biafra War

    The story of how a relatively small, decentralized group like MSF came to lead the response to the world’s biggest outbreak of Ebola began 43 years ago in Paris. Alarmed by war and famine in the Nigerian secessionist state of Biafra, 13 doctors and journalists created an emergency medical response organization that could work around the world.

    The Ebola Scourge »

    The founders imagined a global version of France’s emergency medicine system, according to Peter Redfield, a professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill who published a 2013 book about MSF. The group has since opened offices in 28 countries, and in 1999 it won a Nobel Peace Prize. The money was used to study neglected diseases.

    “They have 40 years of experience dealing with the kind of situation they’re in now,” said Renee Fox, an emeritus professor of sociology at the University of Pennsylvania who published her own book about MSF this year.


    Photographer: Pascal Guyot/AFP via Getty Images

    Medical staff members burn clothes belonging to patients suffering from Ebola, at the... Read More

    MSF views part of its job as “temoignage,” or bearing witness to injustice, Fox said. The organization has clashed with global pharmaceutical companies over the price of medication in developing countries, and this year it spoke out about chemical weapons attacks in Syria. In West Africa, it called for a broader global response before the WHO was willing to acknowledge an emergency existed.

    “People did not listen,” Fox said.

    WHO Director-General Margaret Chan said in an Oct. 17 interview that the agency’s response may not have matched the scale and complexity of the outbreak.

    Lassa Fever

    MSF was already in Guinea when the Ebola outbreak began. A Swiss team doing malaria control in the town of Gueckedou, near the borders with Liberia and Sierra Leone, got a letter from Guinea’s Ministry of Health on March 12 detailing an illness that had struck eight people, including a doctor who died after caring for a patient from Gueckedou. MSF dispatched researchers to take blood samples, case histories and symptoms, according to Hugues Robert-Nicoud, an MSF emergency program manager.


    Photographer: John Moore/Getty Images

    Family members peer into a bedroom as the body of a man awaits the arrival of an Ebola... Read More

    They initially suspected Lassa fever, a disease common in the region. It took a week to organize safe transportation of the blood samples, first to the Guinean capital in Conakry and then to European labs. On March 21, the Pasteur Institute in Lyon, France, said the mystery disease might be either Ebola or Marburg, a similar virus.

    Sinking Boat

    “I dropped my pen and thought, ’This is trouble,’” Robert-Nicoud said. The lab confirmed the worst: Ebola.

    On March 23, the WHO posted the confirmation on its website. A week later, MSF issued a statement citing eight cases in Conakry and calling the outbreak unprecedented. The WHO didn’t declare Ebola an international public health emergency until Aug. 8, more than four months after MSF’s warning.

    In March and April, MSF was able to follow patients and everyone they had come in contact with, what’s known as contact tracing. While MSF has sent almost 300 foreigners to West Africa to fight the epidemic, and has hired about 3,000 locals, it can no longer do effective contact tracing due to the exponential rise in cases, Robert-Nicoud said.

    “There’s a change of scale in this epidemic every two weeks,” he said.

    When he was in Monrovia at the end of September, Robert-Nicoud said the ministry of health told him there were only 12 ambulances to serve a city of 1 million people, where traffic jams can delay delivery of patients to treatment centers by two hours.

    Sinking Feeling

    “It’s this constant feeling that the boat’s sinking,” Robert-Nicoud said. “You try to plug the water that’s coming in, but the holes are everywhere.”

    Meanwhile, the treatment centers promised by leaders in the U.S. and Europe have been slow to materialize, and little has been said of medical personnel to staff them. About 500 of the 4,000 U.S. military personnel authorized for the mission are now in Liberia to build at least 17 100-bed treatment centers, provide logistics and train health workers, the Pentagon said today.

    The U.S. has so far committed to sending 65 medical staff from the Department of Health and Human Services who will provide direct patient care at a 25-bed hospital in Monrovia dedicated to treating infected health workers. The facility is scheduled to be completed by Nov. 5, said Pentagon spokesman Army Colonel Steve Warren.

    Cuba has sent 165 health professionals to Sierra Leone, and China is providing 174 medical staff in the same country, according to the WHO. While more than 600 U.K. National Health Service staff have volunteered to head to Sierra Leone, it’s still unclear how many will be deployed.

    In Monrovia, Georgetown volunteer Lucey’s Elwa3 Hospital consists of 10 tents, stifling in the tropical heat, with corridors of orange netting separating the definitely sick from suspected cases, the dangerous from the safe.

    Some 600 Liberian citizens work with a rotating team of international doctors, nurses and logistics experts. Still, the enveloping suits required to protect caregivers from infection are so hot that doctors must limit their shifts to just 45 minutes.

    Lucey said MSF doctors rely instead on recovering patients for help. Infected adults care for other people’s children; one 20-year-old man took over diaper changes for a sick three-month-old.

    “Every day we have deaths,” Lucey said. “Every morning you get up at 6 a.m., go to sleep at 11 p.m. Meetings in the morning and meetings at night, and you work, work, work until you can’t work anymore. Then you get up in the morning and do it again.”

  • baxterjames120 baxterjames120 Oct 20, 2014 7:56 PM Flag

    I contacted IBIO today, asked them about their collaboration with Caliber. They could not comment on anything I asked them. I expected as much but gave it my best shot.

  • large 5 figure lots being bought

  • It ain't over folks- don't listen to the bashers

  • The Department of Health and Human Services is in advanced discussions to enlist Caliber Biotherapeutics, a Texas company that can produce the drug in millions of tobacco plants, according to federal officials and pharmaceutical industry executives.

    Federal officials, along with two of the world’s biggest charities — the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Wellcome Trust — are also looking at arranging for production of ZMapp in animal cells, the more conventional method used by the biotechnology industry. Although that would take longer, it would allow for greater output by tapping into the biotechnology industry’s huge production capacity.

    Continue reading the main story

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    “We’re going with multiple manufacturers,” a federal official said, speaking on condition of anonymity because contracts have not yet been signed. “Caliber is certainly one we’re considering.”

  • Reply to

    NEWS JUST CAME OUT FROM SEEKING ALPHA!

    by david4109194 Oct 20, 2014 3:03 PM
    baxterjames120 baxterjames120 Oct 20, 2014 3:29 PM Flag

    What kind of BS are you floating out there. The link was to an article in 2010

  • Here comes $3 shorty.

  • Strong buy with strong strength and direction. Oh and we just made a new high for the day

  • iBio, Inc., a biotechnology company, focuses on the commercialization of its proprietary plant-based protein expression technologies in the United States and internationally. Its proprietary technologies include iBioLaunch, a transformative platform technology for the development and production of therapeutic proteins and vaccines; and iBioModulator, a technology platform that enhances the potency and duration of the effect of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. The company’s product candidates comprise IBIO-CFB03, a product for treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis; C1 Esterase Inhibitor, a plasma-derived protein; Alpha-Galactosidase, an enzyme replacement protein; and Palivizumab, a monoclonal antibody for the therapeutic protein market. Its vaccine products include H1N1 Influenza and H5N1 Influenza products that have completed Phase I human clinical trials, as well as yellow fever vaccine; malaria and hookworm parasitic pathogen vaccines; and human papillomavirus therapeutic vaccine. The company’s product candidates also comprise Anthrax/Plague bacterial disease vaccine; and Anthrax, a monoclonal antibody for the biodefense market. It has strategic alliances and collaborations with various companies, such as Fraunhofer Center for Molecular Biology, GE Healthcare, FioCruz, and Caliber Biotherapeutics LLC. The company is headquartered in Newark, Delaware

ONCY
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