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Medical Marijuana, Inc. Message Board

before_its_news 32 posts  |  Last Activity: Jan 21, 2015 3:32 PM Member since: Aug 7, 2012
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  • before_its_news before_its_news Jan 21, 2015 3:32 PM Flag

    Oleksyk’s team is exploring a partnership with the MIT Lincoln Labs, where researchers are investigating the viability of 3-D food printing, starting with baby food. (Because it starts out mushy, baby food is a natural trial substance.)

    3D Systems, a company that has designed a printer for printing intricate sugar confections and is designing a high-speed food printer, is another potential collaborator.


    But they will need a few key additions, Oleksyk explained — anything on the menu for an individual military ration typically requires an extra processing step to make sure the food lasts a long while. A research collaboration with 3D Systems will retrofit rapid 3-D food printers with another step to make the printed food last longer, giving it an extra-long shelf life.


    Among the items in development at the Natick reasearch center is chemically dried “osmo-meat,” a sheetlike jerky designed to survive for months without refrigeration. (Photo: Wendy Maeda/Globe staff)

    Perhaps unsurprisingly, NASA has sidled up as a potential collaborator on Oleksyk’s project. Its vision? 3-D printing could sustain future manned missions.

  • One December afternoon at the Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center, a group of scientists gathered at the base’s Sensory Evaluation Laboratory for a taste test. On the menu: an experimental chocolate protein drink in shot glasses and two versions of a creamy beef and potato stew, arranged on cafeteria trays.

    “Everyone has their own palate,” said Sydney Walker, a senior scientist at the food lab who was setting up the tasting. But she was already expecting a “strong reaction”; cream is always a hard sell.

    Before new items are approved as Army rations, they must clear tests like this one. In the past few months, the lab had hosted tastings for chemically dried “osmo-meat,” a sheetlike jerky designed to survive for months without refrigeration. The consensus: weird, but not too weird. It has moved on to bigger field tests. “You give it to a young person — they give you their honest opinion and you work from there,” Walker said.

    Military recruits develop extreme survival skills, and the food they eat must be equally hardy. Before it is opened up at dinner time, each “Meal, Ready-to-Eat” package — or MRE — has probably been air-dropped from a plane and survived months in blazing heat or freezing cold.


    Vacuum-dried fruits and chicken. (Photo: Wendy Maeda/Globe staff)

    When troops dig into their grilled beef patties or lemon pepper tuna, they have Lauren Oleksyk to thank. She is the team leader of the food science lab at the Natick research center, the Army’s sole incubator for food innovation since 1953.


    Oleksyk’s mission for the last three decades has been to create menus with variety that withstand the toughest conditions — six months at temperatures above 100 degrees Fahrenheit, three years without refrigeration — while also being delicious.

    “It takes lot of science to get food to withstand a lot of these different constraints,” Oleksyk said.
    Oleksyk’s resume includes a patent for a flourless bread that lasts three years on the shelf (her first project) and a “flameless” heater that warms up any of the 24 different hot entrees — including a few vegetarian options — on the menu.

    The “heater” looks like a paper envelope and can hold a foil pouch of the ready-to-eat meal. A few drops of water added to the envelope triggers a reaction with magnesium and iron built into the paper sleeve, which generates enough heat to warm the meal in about 10 minutes.

    In 2014, the Department of Defense approved funding for Oleksyk’s latest obsession: 3-D printing. “The applications are just endless,” she said. “With the development of high-speed printers, it’s just going to expand even more.”

    Oleksyk’s team is exploring a partnership with the MIT Lincoln Labs, where researchers are investigating the viability of 3-D food printing, starting with baby food. (Because it starts out mushy, baby food is a natural trial substance.)

    3D Systems, a company that has designed a printer for printing intricate sugar confections and is designing a high-speed food printer, is another potential collaborator.


    But they will need a few key additions, Oleksyk explained — anything on the menu for an individual military ration typically requires an extra processing step to make sure the food lasts a long while. A research collaboration with 3D Systems will retrofit rapid 3-D food printers with another step to make the printed food last longer, giving it an extra-long shelf life.


    Among the items in development at the Natick reasearch center is chemically dried “osmo-meat,” a sheetlike jerky designed to survive for months without refrigeration. (Photo: Wendy Maeda/Globe staff)

    Perhaps unsurprisingly, NASA has sidled up as a potential collaborator on Oleksyk’s project. Its vision? 3-D printing could sustain future manned missions.

    It makes sense, Oleksyk said. “They also have shelf-life requirements like we do. They also have size constraints like we do. Their printers will also need to be small and compact.”

    But they do have issues that the Army is less apt to worry about. “Their concern is, as the food is printed on the plate, will it stick or float away?” Oleksyk said.

    Another project that has NASA’s attention is a shrinking technology that Oleksyk is developing with a company in Scottsdale, Ariz.

    Creative Resonance has patented a way to create food bars without the sugary binders and preservatives that go into grocery store fruit bars.

    It involves slamming a food product with high-frequency sound waves to shake it free of water, then “welding” it into a slab half its size.

    Oleksyk has samples: A fruit-and-nut bar, something that looks like a coffee- mocha bar, and a solid chunk of chile con carne. Just add water, and they bounce back into shape.

    NASA is interested in this technology to feed a mission to Mars — but first, the soldiers will decide if it tastes good enough.

  • Peter Thiel’s Founders Fund investment in marijuana venture capital firm Privateer Holdings last week is the most mainstream seal of approval on the burgeoning legal cannabis industry. But it’s just one player.

    Investors spent at least $104.5 million on stakes in cannabis-related firms over the last two years, Inc.com reports today. Using data from CB Insights, Inc.com finds evidence for roughly 60 deals. Privateer’s $75 million round is the biggest. But Chicago-based PharmaCann raised $20 million, and Minnesota’s Leafline Labs raised $12.4 million.

    Oakland’s Stephen DeAngelo, co-founder of angel investment network The ArcView Group, also reports $17 million in deals with 34 companies since 2010. ArcView conducts a members-only Shark Tank-like event called “Arc Tank” at the Fairmont Hotel Jan. 25 – 27. “If you’ve ever considered making a play in this industry, now may be the time to make your move,” Arc View writes.

  • PHOENIX -- Arizona legislators should legalize recreational marijuana before voters do according to State Rep. Mark Cardenas. The lawmaker recently began working on a bill to legalize the personal use of marijuana.

    Cardenas said he believes the legislature needs to be proactive when it comes to legalizing pot because it is easier to change a legislative bill than it is a ballot initiative passed by voters.

    "In order to change (a voter referendum or initiative) we have to have 75 percent of the legislature agree to that change and so with something that is as controversial as marijuana you are not going to get 75 percent of the legislature to fix it," Cardenas said.

    Arizona's Voter Protection Act prevents the legislature or governor from tampering with a ballot initiative or referendum passed by voters.

    Being unable to change voter-passed marijuana laws could lead to some unintended consequences like a poorly regulated and taxed system according to Cardenas.

    "It is time to be a little bit smarter about marijuana use and a system of taxation and regulation and say ‘you know what, this is going to happen, we are a group of 90 smart people so let's get together and see how we can best implement this system,'" he said.

    State legislators have an obligation to listen to the will of the voters according to Cardenas and he believes the majority of Arizonans want marijuana prohibition to end.

    "As of right now over 50 percent of the population in Arizona wants it and so this is one of those things that we have to put our egos aside and come to the table and … come up with the best method to make this happen and deploy it in Arizona," he said.

  • before_its_news by before_its_news Jan 12, 2015 10:00 AM Flag

    In a recent commentary in The Providence Journal, James Aubin, the founder of pro-legalization group Common Sense Citizen, argued for the legalization of marijuana in Rhode Island, saying it could boost the state’s sagging economy.

    He included an impressive statistic about the revenue Colorado was bringing in from marijuana sales.

    "Colorado raked in $60 million in marijuana taxes and licensing fees in the past year, plus saved most if not all of the $145 million the Harvard report estimated it spent each year fighting marijuana," Aubin wrote in the Jan. 5, 2015, piece.

  • COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Two proposed ballot measures to legalize medical and recreational marijuana have emerged in Ohio in less than a month.

    The latest, on Thursday from Ohioans to End Prohibition, would legalize the purchase, possession and use of cannabis and cannabis products for Ohioans, ages 21 or older. The group hopes to get the Cannabis Control Amendment before voters in 2016.

    Vice President Jacob Wagner said the measure differs from a proposal announced in December by Responsible Ohio, which calls for establishing 10 authorized growing locations around the state. The Ohioans to End Prohibition measure would not restrict individuals who want to grow marijuana at home for personal use, only retail sales.

    Responsible Ohio hopes to put its ballot measure before voters this fall. The measure also would allow adults, 21 or older, to access marijuana as they do alcohol -- through a market system that's taxed and regulated by the state. Tax proceeds would be distributed to local communities, whose residents would have the power to approve or deny future retail locations through the ballot box.

    Ohioans to End Prohibition favor a system where those with authorized medical conditions could get a patient identification card for buying #$%$ tax-free. Wagner said language that's being drafted would set up a hybrid system like no other in the country.

    "We really just want to help Ohio get control over cannabis - production, retail, revenues," Wagner said. "We want to give the people of Ohio a grip on this problem."

    Wagner said the announcement by Responsible Ohio prompted his group to accelerate rollout of its proposal, which has been under development for about a year and a half. The group aims to launch a revamped website and finalize the ballot language within the next few weeks.

    A team of young professionals is behind the effort -- combining expertise is law, cannabis policy, web design and grassroots political organization, said Wagner, a 29-year-old graduate of Case Western University's law school.

  • The Northeast will likely be the first region of the U.S. to see a legislature — rather than the voters — end the failed prohibition on cannabis, and that effort got underway in Vermont Tuesday.

    Local advocates and organization leaders held a news conference in the Vermont State House the day before the general assembly convened to launch the Vermont Coalition to Regulate Marijuana.

    “Vermonters are ready to end marijuana prohibition and replace it with a more sensible system,” stated Matt Simon, New England Political Director of the Marijuana Policy Project. “Regulating marijuana will take sales out of the underground market and allow for it to be controlled like other products that are legal for adults. Along with improving public safety, it will generate significant new tax revenue and create good jobs for our communities.”

    Joining Simon at the kickoff were Suzi Wizowaty, executive director of Vermonters for Criminal Justice Reform; Allen Gilbert, executive director of the ACLU of Vermont; Joseph McSherry, M.D.,Ph.D., a Burlington-based clinical neurophysiologist; and Fran Janik, a Jamaica (Vt.)-based photographer and #$%$ patient.

    A strong majority (57%) of Vermonters support making marijuana legal for adults, taxing it, and regulating it similarly to alcohol, according to a survey released in May.

    Vermont Sen. David Zuckerman said Tuesday he will introduce a detailed legalization bill “based on the Colorado experience.” Gov. Peter Shumlin has said he supports legalization in theory.

    Ending prohibition in Vermont is opposed by many conservative lawmakers, as well as Project SAM, a national anti-pot group with ties to pharmaceutical drug manufacturers.

  • Until now, it's been a few rich individuals who secretly funded burgeoning pot companies, but for the first time, a major investment firm is going to put multimillion dollars behind marijuana.

    It's a partnership between two investors and the first institutional investments in pot, reports CBS News correspondent Anthony Mason.

    Geoff Lewis's firm, Founders Fund, a $2 billion company, made its name investing early in new companies like Facebook, Spotify and SpaceX. But now it's betting on pot.

    "We discuss all our investments for a long time. ...So particularly in this case, we did an extra, extra deep dive on the business," Lewis said.

    The business is recreational marijuana, now legal in four states. Medicinal marijuana is legal in more than 20.

    Privateers Holdings CEO Brendan Kennedy said it is a watershed moment.

    "It's important for our company, but it's also important for the entire industry," Kennedy said.

    Privateers Holdings is the parent company of three cannabis brands: Tilray, which grows marijuana in Canada; Leafly, an online database of different pot strains and stores; and Marley Natural, from the family of reggae star Bob Marley, which aims to become the "Marlboro of marijuana."

    Kennedy faced challenges along the way.

    "Raising money is always difficult, but raising money in this particular industry is the hardest thing I've ever done," he said. But Founders Fund is backing Kennedy's companies because it sees a future in what they says is already a $40 billion business in the U.S.

    "One of our fundamental beliefs is anyone who wants to consume cannabis is already consuming it," Kennedy said.

    "We will see it transition, transform from being a market that's based on prohibition and an illicit market to being a fully open, fully transparent market. And that's the opportunity," Kennedy added.

    "The surest way of doubling your money investing in cannabis stocks is to fold it back over and put it in your pocket," UCLA professor Mark Klieman warned.

    Klieman studies the cannabis marketplace and cautions: investors beware.

    "A lot of people are crowding into the marijuana industry because they think they are going to be able to sell a legal good at illegal prices," Klieman said. "Competition's not going to allow that. Legal cannabis is going to be dirt cheap, and I think a lot of people are going to lose their shirts trying to sell it."

    That is, if they don't get arrested first. Under federal law, marijuana is still illegal. While the Justice Department has said it won't prosecute cannabis companies following state laws, that could change.

    Kennedy said he doesn't see a risk, however.

    "Over 80 percent of Americans believe the medical cannabis should be legal, 8 out of 10; you can't get 8 out of 10 American's to agree on anything," Kennedy said.

    Lewis said this isn't a politically motivated investment.

    "We're investing because we think it's a great business," he noted.

    Both Lewis and Kennedy believe marijuana will be fully legal in the U.S. within a decade. As of now, there are no numbers on how many businesses have already started, or how many jobs have been created, but many experts agree the marijuana market could become a $150 billion to $200 billion market worldwide.

  • before_its_news by before_its_news Dec 5, 2014 2:16 PM Flag

    sell the news???????

  • Amid legalization drive in states across the country

    New York City officials are considering issuing tickets for possession of small amounts of marijuana instead of arresting people, officials said.

    The new guidelines would allow people with low-level marijuana possession to be issued a court summons rather than requiring them to get handcuffed, arrested, and brought into the precinct for finger-printing, the New York Times reports.

    Police arrested some 50,000 people a year on minor marijuana charges during the administration of former Mayor Michael Bloomberg. Numerous states and localities have decriminalized marijuana for medical or recreational use in recent years.

  • In news that will shock absolutely no one, Kim Kardashian's app, Kim Kardashian: Hollywood, is raking in all of the cash. According to an earnings report from Glu Mobile, the company that developed the game, it made a whopping $43.4 million in Q3 of this year. That's more than 10 other Glu Mobile app games combined, according to The Daily Dot.

    How does a free download make so much money? It's those in-app purchases that get you. And, when more than 22.8 million people have downloaded the thing, those small extras add up.

    It's also surprisingly addictive. Who wouldn't want to play a game in which Kim K is their fairy godmother? (Right?)

  • was #56 this morning, now at #47

  • Thanks to TABOR, Colorado's taxpayer bill-of-rights law, tax revenue that comes in over a certain threshold is mandated to be returned to the taxpayers. Colorado is expecting excess revenue this year, as Governor John Hickenlooper has said, and a rebate will be in order.
    Why? Well, partly because taxes raised from the sale of marijuana have fueled the government's coffers above and beyond what had been expected:

    Gov. John Hickenlooper's proposed $26.8 billion Colorado budget, unveiled Monday afternoon, includes two rebates for taxpayers.

    A $30.5 million rebate for new marijuana taxes is coming. Total state marijuana revenue was different than what was projected in the election blue book for 2013's Proposition AA. Because the estimate was off, under TABOR, the state must refund the money being collected or ask voters again to keep it.

    I had previously written about the dangers of expecting larger-than-projected tax returns, especially for something that is in part a "sin tax", but it does look like Colorado has outperformed its expectations here. Caution is still needed, however: this isn't a reason to overproject tax revenue for the next year going forward when it comes to marijuana. Sin taxes are unpredictable, and sin taxes based on a newly-legal activity likely to be more so.

  • before_its_news by before_its_news Nov 10, 2014 7:23 AM Flag

    #12 in Top Apps (iPhone)

  • Reply to

    Contract Killer 3 days of stats

    by before_its_news Nov 8, 2014 2:46 PM
    before_its_news before_its_news Nov 10, 2014 7:22 AM Flag

    Today's Chart Rankings*
    #1 in Adventure Games (iPhone)
    #1 in Adventure Games (iPad)
    #2 in Action Games (iPhone)
    #2 in Action Games (iPad)
    #2 in Top Games (iPad)
    #3 in Top Games (iPhone)
    #8 in Kids Games (iPad)
    #8 in Top Apps (iPad)
    #12 in Kids Games (iPhone)
    #12 in Top Apps (iPhone)

  • before_its_news by before_its_news Nov 8, 2014 2:46 PM Flag

    #8 on Top Apps for iPad, and it would be even higher if Microsoft didn't come out with updates for Word, Excel and Powerpoint which are #1,2, and 3. Potential blockbuster game.

    Today's Chart Rankings*
    #1 in Adventure Games (iPhone)
    #1 in Adventure Games (iPad)
    #2 in Action Games (iPad)
    #3 in Action Games (iPhone)
    #3 in Top Games (iPad)
    #4 in Top Games (iPhone)
    #8 in Kids Games (iPad)
    #8 in Top Apps (iPad)
    #16 in Kids Games (iPhone)
    #16 in Top Apps (iPhone)

    Yesterday's Chart Rankings*
    #1 in Adventure Games (iPhone)
    #3 in Adventure Games (iPad)
    #3 in Action Games (iPhone)
    #3 in Top Games (iPhone)
    #4 in Action Games (iPad)
    #7 in Top Games (iPad)
    #21 in Top Apps (iPhone)
    #22 in Top Apps (iPad)
    #24 in Kids Games (iPhone)
    #25 in Kids Games (iPad)

    2 Days ago Chart Rankings*
    #4 in Adventure Games (iPhone)
    #10 in Adventure Games (iPad)
    #11 in Action Games (iPhone)
    #18 in Top Games (iPhone)
    #30 in Action Games (iPad)
    #65 in Top Apps (iPhone)
    #70 in Kids Games (iPhone)
    #80 in Top Games (iPad)
    #189 in Top Apps (iPad) Less

  • Reply to

    CC Sniper #78 Grossing in less than 24 hours

    by pauldesisto Nov 7, 2014 11:08 AM
    before_its_news before_its_news Nov 7, 2014 11:24 AM Flag

    It was at #112 just over an hour ago. Money pouring in.

  • PROVIDENCE — This week voters in Oregon and Alaska approved ballot measures to legalize recreational marijuana use for anyone at least 21 years old. The two western states followed the lead of Colorado and Washington, which have already approved and implemented similar measures.

    All four states plan to regulate and tax marijuana like alcohol.



    A marijuana plant

    Photo: Associated Press

    Now, Regulate Rhode Island is putting together a coalition of citizens and organizations to make a push in the General Assembly in 2015 to become the fifth state in the nation to legalize marijuana. It already is one of 23 states and the District of Columbia that permits the sale of #$%$ for licensed patients suffering from chronic pain, cancer, HIV-AIDs and other debilitating ailments.

    Jared Moffat, of Regulate Rhode Island, said it appears that at least five more states could approve the legalization of the drug by 2016.

    Has the time come for Rhode Island to legalize recreational use of marijuana? (386 votes)

    Yes

    No

    View results



    “The results are in, and marijuana prohibition is on its way out,” said Moffat in a statement. “Americans are fed up with wasteful and ineffective laws that punish adults for using a less harmful substance than alcohol. The results are particularly encouraging since voter turnout during a midterm election is typically smaller, older and more conservative. Clearly, support for ending marijuana prohibition spans the political and ideological spectrums.”

    In 2014, Rep. Edith Ajello, D-Providence, and Sen. Joshua Miller, D-Cranston, led the charge to legalize marijuana in Rhode Island and generate tax revenue for the struggling state with one of the highest unemployment rates in the country. The proposed law change died in the General Assembly.

    Moffat also has recruited the support of Elizabeth A. Comery, a retired Providence police officer, and Dr. James Crowley, a physician and former president of the Rhode Island Medical Society.

    Said Comery: “I am part of the Regulate Rhode Island Coalition because when I worked for the Providence Police Department, I saw firsthand how destructive and ineffective our punitive marijuana laws are. Like alcohol prohibition, marijuana prohibition has not stopped Americans from using the substance. It would be much better from a public safety perspective to regulate marijuana and have it sold by responsible business owners who must operate within the law.”

    Crowley added: “Health professionals increasingly support regulating cannabis because they have seen after more than four decades that prohibition does not promote public health. Regulation is far better than prohibition because it allows the state to ensure that cannabis is produced under safe and sanitary conditions and labeled with information about potency.”

  • Kim Kardashian: Contract Killer

  • flying up the charts with a bullet.

    Today's Chart Rankings*
    #1 in Adventure Games (iPhone)
    #3 in Adventure Games (iPad)
    #3 in Action Games (iPhone)
    #3 in Top Games (iPhone)
    #4 in Action Games (iPad)
    #7 in Top Games (iPad)
    #21 in Top Apps (iPhone)
    #22 in Top Apps (iPad)
    #24 in Kids Games (iPhone)
    #25 in Kids Games (iPad)

    Yesterdays Chart Rankings*
    #4 in Adventure Games (iPhone)
    #10 in Adventure Games (iPad)
    #11 in Action Games (iPhone)
    #18 in Top Games (iPhone)
    #30 in Action Games (iPad)
    #65 in Top Apps (iPhone)
    #70 in Kids Games (iPhone)
    #80 in Top Games (iPad)
    #189 in Top Apps (iPad)

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