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CombiMatrix Corporation Message Board

bitesr 51 posts  |  Last Activity: Mar 20, 2015 3:41 AM Member since: Apr 22, 2010
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  • bitesr@ymail.com bitesr Mar 20, 2015 3:41 AM Flag

    Who are They?"

  • I don't. What was done? Is the PD-L1 antibody licensed or not? I thought it was already licensed in China, which was a press release last year. Can someone explain what's going on here.

  • bitesr@ymail.com bitesr Mar 13, 2015 2:55 PM Flag

    BFD. Where are the partners? Still in Fantasyland I suppose. This is the same Dana Farber group who are the inventors of the licensed patents, still tweaking the process. Think they'll get it better eventually? Will TBIO still be around then, still waiting for all those potential partners to materialize?

    Come on herbie, you can do a better pumping than this. I want to short it again but instead the naïve retail investors are wising up and dumping this dog. I guess I'll have to short another Kirk-controlled scam company.

  • Reply to

    Diabetes outcome positive

    by fostergoodwill Mar 11, 2015 2:21 PM
    bitesr@ymail.com bitesr Mar 11, 2015 2:26 PM Flag

    I mentioned it. And if you go to the linked scientific paper, you'll see it is a scam. But you may first need decades experience in the pharma industry to recognize it.

  • Reply to

    PR: great news on DM1!

    by chinaman.nyc2003 Mar 11, 2015 7:21 AM
    bitesr@ymail.com bitesr Mar 11, 2015 2:23 PM Flag

    Yea, right, China. If you believe that press release, I have a bridge to sell you, right in lower Manhattan. I just went negative in view of that press release. Credibility is a terrible thing to waste.

  • bitesr@ymail.com by bitesr Mar 11, 2015 2:07 PM Flag

    I used to have respect for this management team, until today. I understand the financing but the stock price was over-whacked as it was poorly done. But the coup de gras was today's press release about the diabetes antibody. That was absurdly stupid. Read the referenced article. This is an academic exercise that was published much too early in the process, showing a good target for an actual therapeutic or real antibody that can be given to two-legged creatures, instead of 4-legged creatures. Here's a quote from the reference:

    "we developed an anti-mouse NKp46/Ncr1 IgG1,κ mAb (termed NCR1.15) that specifically recognizes recombinant mouse NKp46 (mNKp46) but not human NKp46 (hNKp46)."

    I'll translate: "We found an interesting research tool that has no hope of ever becoming a viable human therapeutic candidate."

    BLRX simply renamed this murine antibody with their own number but hasn't done anything. This is not a drug candidate. But it is a flashing neon sign to any company with access to a fully human antibody library to screen against hNKp46. What a dumb move by BLRX.

  • This goes much higher. Look at the comparables. All have much higher market caps and not nearly as much cash to put products through tot FDA approval. When sanity returns, this trades in the 4-5 range based on value of assets.

  • bitesr@ymail.com bitesr Mar 10, 2015 12:48 AM Flag

    You're wrong about Big Pharma. They are in a high risk, high reward business. Pharma is not a Wall Street player who is an investor. Pharma has VC off-shoots that do the investing of earlier-stage start up companies. TTPH is not a target of Pharma VC arms. Pharma is interested in risk mitigation. That is why TTPH needed to do the financing because they have to prepare to market the product. I don't have a problem with what TTPH is doing, I do have a problem with the stupidity of retail investors who think the pharma world thinks only about M&A and have the same motivations as retail investors.

  • bitesr@ymail.com bitesr Mar 9, 2015 6:14 PM Flag

    The answer is we don't know a buyout price because there are no offers. And on one is interested. Since the hiring of the bankers to sell the company, nothing has happened. Instead you have a big financing. That is not the action of a company that is about to be acquired. That is the action of a company that was not able to be acquired and needs to go forward without a partner.

  • bitesr@ymail.com bitesr Mar 8, 2015 8:13 PM Flag

    I have no inside information here. But I would not be "waiting for Big Pharma" because waiting for Pharma is akin to waiting for Godot. When in this situation, one should ignore the Wall Street and investment banker noise and focus on how to move each clinical asset forward toward approval as quickly and inexpensively as possible. This means stop the stupid press release trick as it only plays to naïve investors who believe it has meaning. It doesn't. It has been particularly stupid with CTIX, which is why I posted. CTIX needs to simply shut up and focus on clinical development. Ignore noisy shareholders and stop listening to bottom tier investment bankers. Either retain Goldman to uplist or don't bother at this time. I don't give a whit what exchange it is on, I can see the stock price when I type in the symbol. Will that change with uplisting, no. So why is this important?

    But the entire sector is on a tear and the rising tide has risen all ships, even the leaky boats. Every stock (for the most part) in this sector is going up as correlations are high. But there will likely be divergence soon when the cream will rise to the top. That's why I'm soon (not yet) going to short those players I think are fakers, and playing with hype only and don't have significant assets, in my opinion. I'm not going to short CTIX, because I like the assets but don't like management, But some of the "fakers" in my opinion are ZIOP which is sporting a $1.3Bil market cap with a bunch of hype and trying to be a me too Juno. Juno is also on my short list based on valuation and enormous risk for its assets. I don't think much of ADXS either. Yes, it's been on a tear recently and it isn't into stupid market cap territory like ZIOP, but listeria transfection for antigen presenting cells has a lot of milestones to achieve and the risk here is stratospheric, in my opinion.

  • bitesr@ymail.com bitesr Mar 5, 2015 3:57 PM Flag

    Sorry bay, I don't agree with you on AGEN. I like BLRX much more. The primary reason is that BLRX's assets are unique and address a niche market segment. AGEN looks like it has a bunch of me too oncology antibodies. Look, everyone and their mother has antibodies to CTLA4, TIM-3 and PD-1. Merck just got approval for their PD-1 antibody and was sued for patent infringement the next day by BMS enforcing the Ono patent trying to claim all PD-1 antibodies (my handicap is that Merck will win). In other words, AGEN's assets are in too crowded an oncology space, in my opinion.

  • bitesr@ymail.com bitesr Mar 5, 2015 2:36 PM Flag

    There are no suitors because this little group is off the radar. Instead all we get are stupid hyped up press releases without substantive information. Pharma scouts don't pay attention to this hype, only real data in prestigious, peer-reviewed scientific publications (not name-dropping where clinical trials are being run). It is a different universe between information flow to retail investors who live in hope and hype of massive upside benefit without paying attention to risk of failure. But the pharma world derives value based on risk mitigation, and do not "expect" positive results on anything. Pharma's live in Missouri, the "show-me" state. And the poor management of CTIX is busy crying wolf with hyped up, information lacking press releases, such that the boy who cries wolf too often gets ignored even when the real wolf appears.

    Contrast CTIX (which I own but not that much) with BLRX, another small pharma (where I have a much larger long position). Both are small pharma development companies and both are public. But the similarity ends there. BLRX management is much smarter and refrains from stupid press releases. Instead, they quietly partner up. Look at the BLRX deal with Novartis. As for my investments, I'm about a 2X in both, but BLRX stayed low for longer before it started rising in the recent life science, highly correlated run up. This recent run up in the sector is highly correlated but CTIX hasn't been participating, probably due to a lack of institutional support due to its hyped-up press releases playing to the naïve retail investor.

    Lastly, GO HAWKS!. Went to the 49ers game at the Clink in Dec. Needed ear plugs as the decibel level was so high even in the nose-bleed section where we got seats.

  • bitesr@ymail.com bitesr Mar 3, 2015 6:57 PM Flag

    Yo, naïve rookie. Do you have any clue how pharma deals are structured? I think not. Go do your homework before you pop off and leave us with no doubt of your stupidity. Please ask yourself, why was this a distressed asset in the first place? Part of the answer will be that the royalty burden is too high, which directly impacts margins and the bottom line. Buying low for a distressed asset means something is wrong with the asset. And a 5% royalty for a drug designer is a huge red flag that reduces the value of the asset, hence the low upfront price because margins take a big hit. Now go to LES (licensing executive society), pay the fees to gain access to their reference materials, and do your homework on reasonable royalty for a pharmacophor design. You'll be quizzed later.

    In this world you get what you pay for. And value of an asset is inverse to risk. One invests in the asset to mitigate risk. Sometimes things work and risk is mitigated and sometimes things blow up. It's best to fail early, not later. That's why I've been complaining about the stupid press releases, ones that don't show risk mitigation, just that Leo et al. are living in hope of a big market. Hope is not a strategy, Passing milestones is the only way to add value and that is risk mitigation.

  • bitesr@ymail.com bitesr Mar 3, 2015 5:51 PM Flag

    Much drug SAR and initial structure development is done now through "in silico" analysis. Many of the drugs I work with now, in what I do for a living (remember I work in this industry but not for CTIX), were first designed in a pharmacophor through software based on 3D structural fitting into a target. While I'm thrilled Penn gets a royalty (Go Quakers! from a proud alum) Yale is a different university (when I was at Penn we routinely beat Yale in basketball). There a company called Schroedinger (German spelling) that does computer drug design as a service to all who will pay. So what's the point of this? This is how new drugs are designed. Further, a 5% royalty for drug design is out-of whack and well above current market rates, based on the deals I've done and based on my research into market rates. Good for Penn, bad for CTIX.

  • bitesr@ymail.com bitesr Mar 3, 2015 3:15 PM Flag

    How is this remotely relevant? Brainless word searches waste time.

  • bitesr@ymail.com bitesr Mar 2, 2015 8:03 PM Flag

    Folks, As I've posted before, I own long shares (about 25K of them) that were bought in the March-June time frame 2014. I'd like the gain to be long term. I also work in this industry and understand what should be stated as part of an SEC requirement to only disclose to the public material information, as I've seen the downside of too much hype. I'm also old enough to remember an old biotech controversy of a company called Centocor (later acquired by J&J) that has an anti-TNF antibody Remicade (competes with Embrel and Humira) where a famous Wall Street Journal article accused the company of issuing a press release "every time an antibody belches." The stick-up-the-rear-end response from the company was that antibodies don't belch. CTIX reminds me of that old story.

  • I was so happy last week. Leo kept his fat yap shut and the share price slowly crept up. But all good things must come to an end. We have yet another non-material hype press release that does not show any value to an asset and the stock price responds according, that is, it goes down. When will the message get into Leo's thick skull that he needs to walk softly and shut up, particularly when he doesn't have anything material to say (like today). This has consistently been my problem with this weak management.

    Anyone else loaning their shares at Schwab? It is now paying 11%, while we wait for real news and to hit the cap gains tax rate, not the fake hype stuff Leo keeps spewing out.

  • Reply to

    Where's herbie?

    by bitesr Feb 28, 2015 6:43 PM
    bitesr@ymail.com bitesr Mar 1, 2015 10:44 PM Flag

    I'll answer your question herbie ("If you are so confident about your April Fools Lie, why did you cover. "). When you have a pump and dump stock like this one, it takes longer for the true believers to capitulate, But this was a fast dump from over 4 to $1.65, so I took my profits. Moreover, I wonder what caused the stock price to more than double over 4 with no news of any kind and no substantive news (powerpoint fantasies do not constitute news, or real accomplishment). That means Kirk is now free to manipulate away because it doesn't take much money in a thinly traded stock to drive it up, particularly when Kirk harbours a fantasy that some foolish company will buy this trash. So keep on pump'n herbie. I can use my profits to short more if you can do another pump round before the inevitable dump after April Fools' Day, or perhaps the Ides of March.

    GO Hoos!

  • Reply to

    Where's herbie?

    by bitesr Feb 28, 2015 6:43 PM
    bitesr@ymail.com bitesr Mar 1, 2015 6:38 PM Flag

    Glad to see you back herbie. It seems you want AWOL when the going got tough for the longs. But you need to work on your reading comprehension skills and perhaps get some scientific knowledge regarding the basic chemistry and biology of what this company is trying to do. You seem to be lacking in those skills and knowledge. If all you're doing is accepting powerpoint slides (which your comments reflect), you have no credibility. Nor did you read my post indicating that I successfully completed my short that I first posted and established when the stock blipped up north of 4 (absurd and stupid territory). So play it again, herbie. I've got the need for speed (that is another quickie short money-maker when a worthless stock gets into stupid territory). Better pump it up before April Fools' Day and the debt turns this stock into a pumpkin.

  • bitesr@ymail.com by bitesr Feb 28, 2015 6:43 PM Flag

    Herbie, your male bovine excrement hyping is needed to shore up the share price of this flea-bitten canine. But, alas, it appears that you're in a quiet period because you're paid by the company to try to manage this message board and you have to keep your yap shut in a quiet period surrounding a financing. So come on back herbie and hype up the stock price so more. I want to play it again, sam, and short it again as the stock dropped more than 50% in short order in the last short round. (Yes that means I covered on Friday, making well north of US$2 per share.)

    Tell us, oh wise herbie, what will the Kirk-appointed goons running this hype factory do with $6Mil in new cash while diluting the shareholders close to 50%? Will it invest in a new, and perhaps real business this time? Or will the money be used to simply pay off the debt due on April Fools Day? Or will the money be used for life-support so that the Kirk goons can continue to be paid for 6 months while putting out meaningless fantasy powerpoints? Since the patent troll business was a bust, what's next? Come on herbie, we need some more humour.

    Tell us, oh wise herbie, when the quiet period is over and you still get paid for managing the message as a PR hype-meister. And tell Kirk we can agree on one thing this coming March, GO Hoos!.

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