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Nokia Corporation Message Board

blimpsrus2001 326 posts  |  Last Activity: 14 hours ago Member since: Jan 22, 2008
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  • Reply to

    I'm buying what I can

    by jeffreber44 14 hours ago
    blimpsrus2001 blimpsrus2001 14 hours ago Flag

    Absolutely I see 9.50 eoy

  • Reply to

    uh-oh..

    by peeeelosi 20 hours ago
    blimpsrus2001 blimpsrus2001 18 hours ago Flag

    Just a combination of many factors ALU,turmoil around the world and profit taking.Next leg up 8.50

  • Reply to

    uh-oh..

    by peeeelosi 20 hours ago
    blimpsrus2001 blimpsrus2001 20 hours ago Flag

    Buy more Nokia on the dip

  • Reply to

    Silence from Moody, Fitch and S&P???

    by totenham77 Jul 30, 2014 10:57 PM
    blimpsrus2001 blimpsrus2001 Jul 30, 2014 11:22 PM Flag

    No upgrades because Nokia had several upgrades prior to earnings.

  • blimpsrus2001 blimpsrus2001 Jul 29, 2014 8:29 PM Flag

    You are obviously a gambler not an investor.Good luck with that.

  • Reply to

    Funny how the India tax shakedown has become quiet.

    by nysexxx Jul 29, 2014 6:26 PM
    blimpsrus2001 blimpsrus2001 Jul 29, 2014 7:13 PM Flag

    I also made a bundle on Nokia was impatient at one point but I know Nokia will do very well in the future.Apple took years to accelerate.Takes time for companies to turn around especially when on the verge of going under.under. Realx you will live longer

  • Reply to

    Funny how the India tax shakedown has become quiet.

    by nysexxx Jul 29, 2014 6:26 PM
    blimpsrus2001 blimpsrus2001 Jul 29, 2014 6:29 PM Flag

    nysexx are you a shareholder if you are sit back and relax Nokia will reward you if not go haunt another board

  • Reply to

    not gain for 3 days.....

    by insiderguy_200077 Jul 29, 2014 10:17 AM
    blimpsrus2001 blimpsrus2001 Jul 29, 2014 10:25 AM Flag

    It will gain soon enough insiderguy: Nokia Co. (ADR) Company Profile
    Consensus Ratings for Nokia Co. (ADR) (NYSE:NOK) (?)
    Ratings Breakdown: 3 Sell Rating(s), 16 Hold Rating(s), 17 Buy Rating(s)
    Consensus Rating: Hold (Score: 2.39)
    Consensus Price Target: $12.49 (52.51% upside)
    Analysts' Ratings History for Nokia Co. (ADR) (NYSE:NOK)
    Show:
    Date Firm Action Rating Price Target Details Share
    7/24/2014 MKM Partners Boost Price Target Neutral $7.75 - $8.25 View Tweet This Rating Share This Rating on StockTwits
    6/23/2014 Raymond James Upgrade Underperform - Market Perform View Tweet This Rating Share This Rating on StockTwits
    6/12/2014 RBC Capital Boost Price Target Outperform $9.00 - $11.00 View Tweet This Rating Share This Rating on StockTwits
    5/27/2014 Canaccord Genuity Boost Price Target Buy $10.25 - $11.00 View Tweet This Rating Share This Rating on StockTwits
    5/21/2014 Deutsche Bank Upgrade Hold - Buy $10.12 View Tweet This Rating Share This Rating on StockTwits
    5/21/2014 Jefferies Group Upgrade Hold - Buy View Tweet This Rating Share This Rating on StockTwits
    5/9/2014 Zacks Reiterated Rating Outperform - Outperform $8.75 Less

  • Reply to

    We should be at $8.40 US holding it down.

    by buysiri Jul 29, 2014 9:34 AM
    blimpsrus2001 blimpsrus2001 Jul 29, 2014 9:38 AM Flag

    Will be 8.40 soon enough 9.50+ end of year

  • Reply to

    nok up in fin..

    by insiderguy_200077 Jul 29, 2014 9:30 AM
    blimpsrus2001 blimpsrus2001 Jul 29, 2014 9:36 AM Flag

    Off by 6 cents? 6.11 EUR US 8.21

  • Congrats to the investors who hung in there since 2.00.After noticing the restructuring that Nokia has completed over the last few years and taking a good look at their current product line, it became clear to me that this company is turning a corner. My next step was to begin to take a look at the numbers to see if I could find quantitative support for my qualitative hypothesis. This was not an easy project as Nokia is made up of three different businesses and billions of dollars worth of intangibles in the form of Intellectual Property and Patents.PATENTS

    Nokia’s patents alone produce over $500 million in revenues per year, meanwhile the company is beginning to aggressively defend these patents in an attempt to provide even more revenue growth. These patents cover a wide range of technology and incorporate much of the many billions of dollars the firm has spent on Research and Development in the last couple of decades. Given that the firm can produce $500 million a year from their patent portfolio (current revenues from patents exceed this number substantially), and doing some financial analysis, one can conclude that Nokia’s patent portfolio on its own is worth about $1.50-$2.00 per share.

    CASH

    Due to lack of investor confidence, Nokia has made it a priority to cut down on some investments, decrease the size of the company’s balance sheet and raise cash. This is extremely important for a company going through restructuring and the firm has done extremely well in this area. As of December 31st, 2012 Nokia had cash and short term liquidable investments equal to $3.57 per share. This is substantial considering that the firm is currently trading at only $3.33 per share (as of 3/22/2013).So, with patents worth about $1.75 per share and cash equal to about $3.57 per share, how can Nokia possibly be trading at $3.33? Well, the firm has been losing money at a growing pace for the last couple of years. However, their recent advances in the smartphone area with the Lumia 920, which is an extremely impressive phone, along with the company’s Asha line which has been selling well in Asia should provide the growth necessary to bring Nokia’s Devices and Services segment back to positive ground within the next couple of years. On top of this, Nokia’s partnership with Siemens has proven to be a success and has produced steady revenue growth. The firm recently issued a statement claiming that they expect this area, which has been producing revenues of close to $20 billion dollars a year to have operating margins of 5%-10% in the near future.

    DISCOUNTED CASH FLOW ANALYSIS

    With all of this data collected, I began to put together my discounted cash flow model. However, I decided that the currency fluctuations of the Euro have made it difficult to forecast future cash flows for Nokia, so I went back 10 years and normalized the firms revenues by converting each years revenues and operating profits back to US dollars using the average Euro exchange rate for that year. Growth rates and margins were dramatically different per business segment and were projected primarily through statistical analysis of historical data. My projections are actually quite conservative considering the improvement potential that Nokia has. Even with negative cash flows for the next 2 years, my analysis shows that the company’s stock is still worth over $6 per share.What this model says is that even with negative cash flows until 2016, and conservatively projected growth and operating margins, the firm is still worth $6.15 per share. Nokia is currently priced for bankruptcy at its current market price, meanwhile the company continues to innovate and improve their competitive position. This dichotomy will not last. Nokia CEO, Stephen Elop is not trying to just gain a little bit of market share, he strongly believes that Nokia can become one of the top companies in the technology field once again.

  • blimpsrus2001 by blimpsrus2001 Jul 28, 2014 8:41 PM Flag

    Consensus Ratings for Nokia Co. (ADR) (NYSE:NOK) (?)
    Ratings Breakdown: 3 Sell Rating(s), 16 Hold Rating(s), 17 Buy Rating(s)
    Consensus Rating: Hold (Score: 2.39)
    Consensus Price Target: $12.49 (52.51% upside)
    Analysts' Ratings History for Nokia Co. (ADR) (NYSE:NOK)
    Show:
    Date Firm Action Rating Price Target Details Share
    7/24/2014 MKM Partners Boost Price Target Neutral $7.75 - $8.25 View Tweet This Rating Share This Rating on StockTwits
    6/23/2014 Raymond James Upgrade Underperform - Market Perform View Tweet This Rating Share This Rating on StockTwits
    6/12/2014 RBC Capital Boost Price Target Outperform $9.00 - $11.00 View Tweet This Rating Share This Rating on StockTwits
    5/27/2014 Canaccord Genuity Boost Price Target Buy $10.25 - $11.00 View Tweet This Rating Share This Rating on StockTwits
    5/21/2014 Deutsche Bank Upgrade Hold - Buy $10.12 View Tweet This Rating Share This Rating on StockTwits
    5/21/2014 Jefferies Group Upgrade Hold - Buy View Tweet This Rating Share This Rating on StockTwits
    5/9/2014 Zacks Reiterated Rating Outperform - Outperform $8.75

  • Equities research analysts at MKM Partners increased their price target on shares of Nokia Co. (NYSE:NOK) from $7.75 to $8.25 in a research note issued to investors on Thursday. The firm currently has a “neutral” rating on the stock. MKM Partners’ price objective would suggest a potential upside of 0.12% from the company’s current price.
    Shares of Nokia Co. (NYSE:NOK) traded down 0.96% on Thursday, hitting $8.24. The stock had a trading volume of 15,949,614 shares. Nokia Co. has a 1-year low of $3.87 and a 1-year high of $8.35. The stock’s 50-day moving average is $7.75 and its 200-day moving average is $7.55. The company’s market cap is $30.602 billion. Nokia Co. also saw a large growth in short interest in the month of July. As of July 15th, there was short interest totalling 23,770,984 shares, a growth of 18.2% from the June 30th total of 20,105,704 shares. Based on an average trading volume of 9,734,724 shares, the days-to-cover ratio is currently 2.4 days. Currently, 0.0% of the company’s shares are sold short.
    Nokia Co. (NYSE:NOK) last posted its quarterly earnings results on Thursday, July 24th. The company reported $0.06 earnings per share (EPS) for the quarter, missing the consensus estimate of $0.07 by $0.01. The company had revenue of $2.94 billion for the quarter, compared to the consensus estimate of $3.91 billion. The company’s revenue for the quarter was down 47.5% on a year-over-year basis. Analysts expect that Nokia Co. will post $0.32 EPS for the current fiscal year.A number of other analysts have also recently weighed in on NOK. Analysts at Raymond James upgraded shares of Nokia Co. from an “underperform” rating to a “market perform” rating in a research note on Monday, June 23rd. Separately, analysts at RBC Capital raised their price target on shares of Nokia Co. from $9.00 to $11.00 in a research note on Thursday, June 12th. They now have an “outperform” rating on the stock. Finally, analysts at Canaccord Genuity raised their price target on shares of Nokia Co. from $10.25 to $11.00 in a research note on Tuesday, May 27th. They now have a “buy” rating on the stock. Three analysts have rated the stock with a sell rating, sixteen have given a hold rating and seventeen have given a buy rating to the company’s stock. The stock currently has an average rating of “Hold” and a consensus target price of $12.49.
    Nokia Corporation invests in technological devices. The Company is focused on three businesses: network infrastructure software, hardware and services, which it offers through Networks; location intelligence, which the Company provides through HERE, and advanced technology development and licensing, which the Company pursues through Technologies.

  • Reply to

    Buy back today

    by paul.herschberger Jul 28, 2014 2:57 PM
    blimpsrus2001 blimpsrus2001 Jul 28, 2014 3:29 PM Flag

    As far as the buyback goes, these shares can be repurchased directly in the market, or they can be transacted by entering into derivative, share lending or other arrangements. These shares repurchased can also reduce the number of the shares outstanding or can offset share-based incentive plans (option dilution).

    Lastly, these share buybacks will start only after its second-quarter earnings results, which are due on July 24, 2014. The current authorization is valid until December 17, 2015.

    In short, Nokia shares are up at a 52-week high in ADS terms, based on what now is the equivalent of a $30 billion market cap. Again, we cannot help but wonder if the excitement around its capital optimization plan may have run a bit far already.

  • blimpsrus2001 blimpsrus2001 Jul 28, 2014 12:33 PM Flag

    Hey Bill can Nokia accomplish this? I think they can: Nokia accomplishing this feat and most do not see this coming.Interview Nokia has a radical strategy to outflank some of the world’s biggest technology companies, including Google, and it shared some of the details with El Reg in Barcelona this week.

    According to Michael Halbherr, a key member of Nokia’s top executive team and arguably number two to CEO Stephen Elop, location-based human behaviour information is the new Google search results – instead of web pages, it’s “search results for the real world”.

    This is Nokia's plan. To make intelligent inferences, it needs lots of data: Really, Really Big Data. What certain kinds of people do at a given time, on a given day, in a particular place. And the system needs to scale. So Nokia is licensing its location-finding services to rival phone manufacturers in order to achieve this.

    Apple has its own. Android and non-Android manufacturers are reluctant to become dumb waiters as this valuable information is collected by Google. Fine, use our platform, Nokia says to them, and you can keep it and use it too. Google and Apple are not sharing their ‘behaviour platform’ quite as freely, if at all.

    Halbherr provided some fascinating new insights into the thinking behind the plan for the first time anywhere.

    He said we’re only at the beginning of what the technology can do. Mobile devices have maps – and in Nokia’s case, very good maps – that are responsive, vector-based charts that work offline and cover just about every corner of the world. They can include related information – such as traffic or restaurant reviews. So why’s it giving it all away?
    Technology still doesn’t provide the right information people need when they need it - and still makes things really complicated for a mobile user, thinks Halbherr. “Licensing Frommer’s Travel Guide or Lonely Planet isn’t enough anymore,” he saysWe think this is the next Google, only it’s indexing the real world,” said Halbherr. The platform learns about the individual and adds it to aggregate datasets, such as "what is there to do in Boston at 10pm after a football game".

    Nokia EVP of Location and Commerce
    Michael Halbherr
    “It’s a large-scale machine-learning problem,” he said.

    Halbherr arrived at Nokia in 2006 with the acquisition of mapping company Gate5; he has an engineering PhD, so when he talks about AI it’s in rather more grounded terms than what you might hear from other top tech execs.

    If you think about how search engines started rating web pages – first by primitive keyword counts, then by Google-like page ranking – then it’s a natural progression. But you need a lot of data to do this, said Halbherr: “Where do people go at 10pm after a movie? It’s about building up these kinds of connections.”

    Nokia isn’t alone in building these "placegraphs" or "human motion graphs" – but it is alone in seeking to share them with all-comers, which include rival handset makers. “Meaningful recommendations need deep analytics,” he told us.Before going on to the implications, let’s clarify what Nokia is actually doingIn 2007 Nokia acquired US electronic navigation company Navteq for $8.1bn, and thus grabbed a profitable intellectual property licensing business. Early on, Nokia sold upgrades to its handset users for turn-by-turn driving navigation, but then Google offered this for free. Nokia touted downloadable global maps – and Google now offers this for free, too. It’s a competitive business.

    So how could Nokia realise some value from an asset that was being destroyed by commoditisation? By going horizontal. Halbherr sketches out a 3x3 grid for the HERE platform as it’s now called – there's no Nokia branding anywhere on the technology.

    In one corner is where Nokia keeps its "first and best" products. Everything else on the grid is licensed out; this includes things that were touted as Nokia-only unique mapping-based apps but will rapidly become platform features. CityLens is an example: it’s now another HERE platform API called Livesight.

    So the three tiers on the licensing grid are Nokia-only products, technology for Windows gear manufacturers, then things for all the other hardware companies.

    “We look at the world through the eyes of an OEM [original equipment manufacturer]. We work with OEMs like HTC and Samsung, because an OEM controls the business model for the device,” he said.

    The platform will be OS-neutral, and firms making an Android or Mozilla OS phone will be able to use the same features. And they’ll get the goodies that are Nokia’s exclusives today – such as vector maps and offline data: “There is a price for the data and a price for the SDK [software development kit]”, we're told.Amazon is an SDK licensee, so programmers writing apps for the Kindle range are actually using Nokia’s HERE maps – they just don’t know it. The rebranding means apps formerly known as Nokia Maps, Nokia Drive and Nokia Transit (Transport in the UK) become the shouty-named HERE suite (and the equally shouty HERE Maps, HERE Drive and HERE Transit).So a Nokia Lumia owner will get access to all the world’s offline maps, but an OEM gets just a country licence, Halbherr explained.

    What would the platform be able to do once it had all this really big data? One example was that people would get a tip on which bar they might like after a movie. However, the very last bar I’d want to go to after a film is the bar everyone else had been tipped to go to. It would be pretty crowded, for a start, and hard to get a drink.

    But the system could provide nudging information, Halbherr said, such as advising some people to leave work early for a faster ride and tell some others to depart later. Didn’t this risk running into the problems of behaviourism, I wondered?

    The problem with this paternalistic approach is thatonce people realise they’re being manipulated, they stop responding as the system "thinks" they should. In fact, they may respond very negatively. This was a potential issue, said Halbherr, just as privacy was an issue. There had to be a strong trust relationship and not one manufacturers or service providers could abuse.

    He’s certainly mindful of the pitfalls. Halbherr cited Frommer’s as an example of something that pleased mathematicians more than users – it averaged the feedback it received, and lost personal and idiosyncratic touches. It didn’t really give very good recommendations, in his opinion.

    The mapping business at Nokia is doing very well today – bringing in #$%$400m in the last quarter – making it a significant company in its own right, and growingly rapidly. But with "real world search", Europe’s biggest tech company is launching the next epic industry battle, and Google is firmly in its sights. If it reaches even a significant fraction of Google’s web-page search revenues, then Nokia will be a significant disruptor, and a major player in its own right. Less

  • Nokia announced a strong set of Q2 2014 results Thursday, as the company easily beat market estimates on the back of robust global LTE spending and continued high level of profitability in its Networks business. Although Nokia continued to see its networking services revenues shrink on the back of divestitures and contract exits in unprofitable regions, this impact was somewhat offset by healthy demand for mobile broadband infrastructure among carriers, especially in regions such as China where the transition to 4G LTE is underway. Although Europe remained challenging during the quarter, the company has built a strong pipeline of orders on a number of recent contract wins, such as Everything Everywhere and Vodafone, which should bolster sales towards the latter half of the year. A second-half revenue boost is expected in the U.S and China as well, with carriers such as Sprint, China Mobile and China Telecom expected to substantially increase their network spending.Even though overall sales declined in high single-digits on a y-o-y basis, they grew in double-digits over the previous quarter. Moreover, they were far above analyst forecasts compiled by Thomson Reuters. Compared to the Network division’s reported operating profit of $378 million and operating margin of 11% for Q2, analyst estimates for the same metrics were $265 million and 7.7%, respectively. In fact, looking at its progress in maintaining profitability along with top line gains, the company raised its operating margin estimate for Networks to be slightly above the higher end of its long term target of 5-10%.Networks to Drive Sales, Profitability

    The sale of the handset business made Networks (formerly NSN) the biggest contributor to Nokia’s value, accounting for almost half of its total value by our estimates. Before being promoted as Nokia’s CEO, Rajeev Suri headed the Networks division for the company. At the helm of NSN, Suri is credited with turning the division around to sustained profitability on the back of a big restructuring program that cut its operating expenses by Euro 1.35 billion and increased its focus on mobile broadband. However, the transition took a toll on Nokia’s top line, which declined by 17% year-over-year in the first quarter this year as the company exited unprofitable service contracts, primarily in EMEA and Latin America.

    In the second quarter, the company was able to reverse much of its top line losses by banking on higher LTE spending across geographies, especially Greater China and the Asia-Pacific. Excluding the impact of divestitures, contract exits and currency fluctuations, Nokia’s Q2 Networks revenues actually grew by 1% y-o-y – an improvement over the decline of 6% in the previous quarter and 12% in Q4 2013.Going forward, rising 4G LTE deployment activity should help improve revenues further. Nokia has done well in winning LTE contracts with China Mobile and China Telecom, and has emerged as one of the leading foreign players in the Chinese LTE buildout. Although European sales have been slow to recover, the deal pipeline looks strong as carrier spending returns amid receding macroeconomic uncertainty. In Europe, Nokia won two large LTE contracts with Everything Everywhere and Vodafone, which should help stabilize revenues in the second half of the year. The company’s contract win at Sprint is also unlikely to prop revenues until the second half, with the carrier unlikely to splurge on its Spark program before the completion of its initial LTE layout by mid-2014.Nokia Preparing HERE For The Long Run

    HERE, Nokia’s mapping and location intelligence business, saw operational sales grow by 2% y-o-y on the back of rising automotive sales as well as embedded navigation system sales. The company also made a couple of interesting deals in the quarter to make its HERE unit more personalized and intuitive and boost the long term potential of its mapping business. The Finnish company acquired artificial intelligence firm Desti towards the end of May and announced its plans to buy predictive analytics company Medio Systems last month. Nokia also launched a $100 million Connected Car Fund recently to identify and invest in companies which can help grow HERE’s location and mapping ecosystem in the automotive space. According to our estimates, HERE currently contributes less than 4% of the company’s valuation but its potential for future growth is immense considering the rising demand and growing penetration of intelligent location and mapping services, especially in autos and smartphones.

    Nokia provides its map data to 80% of all car-navigation systems in the world and several major enterprises including Amazon, Yahoo and Microsoft. In fact, Microsoft is going to be one of Nokia’s biggest customers in the short to medium term with its four-year licensing deal to use HERE on its mobile devices. We expect the recent acquisitions and investments to help the company lay a solid foundation for its long-term growth and attract customers going forward.

  • Reply to

    Buying has begun

    by buysiri Jul 28, 2014 7:32 AM
    blimpsrus2001 blimpsrus2001 Jul 28, 2014 7:34 AM Flag

    8.30 come to Papa :)

  • blimpsrus2001 blimpsrus2001 Jul 28, 2014 7:25 AM Flag

    8.30 come to papa :)

  • Nokia MD-12 Portable Wireless Speaker is now available for order from Microsoft Store. It is available in yellow, green, orange and white colors and priced at $49.

    Product Description:

    Don’t let its size fool you—this little guy packs a punch. Engineered with the latest technology, the MD-12 has an actuator built in, creating a big bass effect when you set on nearly any surface.

    With NFC (Near Field Communication) included, just tap your NFC-enabled phone to the speaker and the music starts flowing. Or use Bluetooth and stream your tunes wirelessly and dance the night away with a guaranteed 15 hours of music play on the rechargeable battery. All this in a speaker that’s just 1.5 inches high and weighs only 6.3 ounces. 49.99

  • blimpsrus2001 blimpsrus2001 Jul 27, 2014 9:45 PM Flag

    joshua I can see Nokia accomplishing this feat and most do not see this coming.Interview Nokia has a radical strategy to outflank some of the world’s biggest technology companies, including Google, and it shared some of the details with El Reg in Barcelona this week.

    According to Michael Halbherr, a key member of Nokia’s top executive team and arguably number two to CEO Stephen Elop, location-based human behaviour information is the new Google search results – instead of web pages, it’s “search results for the real world”.

    This is Nokia's plan. To make intelligent inferences, it needs lots of data: Really, Really Big Data. What certain kinds of people do at a given time, on a given day, in a particular place. And the system needs to scale. So Nokia is licensing its location-finding services to rival phone manufacturers in order to achieve this.

    Apple has its own. Android and non-Android manufacturers are reluctant to become dumb waiters as this valuable information is collected by Google. Fine, use our platform, Nokia says to them, and you can keep it and use it too. Google and Apple are not sharing their ‘behaviour platform’ quite as freely, if at all.

    Halbherr provided some fascinating new insights into the thinking behind the plan for the first time anywhere.

    He said we’re only at the beginning of what the technology can do. Mobile devices have maps – and in Nokia’s case, very good maps – that are responsive, vector-based charts that work offline and cover just about every corner of the world. They can include related information – such as traffic or restaurant reviews. So why’s it giving it all away?

    Technology still doesn’t provide the right information people need when they need it - and still makes things really complicated for a mobile user, thinks Halbherr. “Licensing Frommer’s Travel Guide or Lonely Planet isn’t enough anymore,” he saysWe think this is the next Google, only it’s indexing the real world,” said Halbherr. The platform learns about the individual and adds it to aggregate datasets, such as "what is there to do in Boston at 10pm after a football game".

    Nokia EVP of Location and Commerce
    Michael Halbherr
    “It’s a large-scale machine-learning problem,” he said.

    Halbherr arrived at Nokia in 2006 with the acquisition of mapping company Gate5; he has an engineering PhD, so when he talks about AI it’s in rather more grounded terms than what you might hear from other top tech execs.

    If you think about how search engines started rating web pages – first by primitive keyword counts, then by Google-like page ranking – then it’s a natural progression. But you need a lot of data to do this, said Halbherr: “Where do people go at 10pm after a movie? It’s about building up these kinds of connections.”

    Nokia isn’t alone in building these "placegraphs" or "human motion graphs" – but it is alone in seeking to share them with all-comers, which include rival handset makers. “Meaningful recommendations need deep analytics,” he told us.

    Before going on to the implications, let’s clarify what Nokia is actually doingIn 2007 Nokia acquired US electronic navigation company Navteq for $8.1bn, and thus grabbed a profitable intellectual property licensing business. Early on, Nokia sold upgrades to its handset users for turn-by-turn driving navigation, but then Google offered this for free. Nokia touted downloadable global maps – and Google now offers this for free, too. It’s a competitive business.

    So how could Nokia realise some value from an asset that was being destroyed by commoditisation? By going horizontal. Halbherr sketches out a 3x3 grid for the HERE platform as it’s now called – there's no Nokia branding anywhere on the technology.

    In one corner is where Nokia keeps its "first and best" products. Everything else on the grid is licensed out; this includes things that were touted as Nokia-only unique mapping-based apps but will rapidly become platform features. CityLens is an example: it’s now another HERE platform API called Livesight.

    So the three tiers on the licensing grid are Nokia-only products, technology for Windows gear manufacturers, then things for all the other hardware companies.

    “We look at the world through the eyes of an OEM [original equipment manufacturer]. We work with OEMs like HTC and Samsung, because an OEM controls the business model for the device,” he said.

    The platform will be OS-neutral, and firms making an Android or Mozilla OS phone will be able to use the same features. And they’ll get the goodies that are Nokia’s exclusives today – such as vector maps and offline data: “There is a price for the data and a price for the SDK [software development kit]”, we're told.Amazon is an SDK licensee, so programmers writing apps for the Kindle range are actually using Nokia’s HERE maps – they just don’t know it. The rebranding means apps formerly known as Nokia Maps, Nokia Drive and Nokia Transit (Transport in the UK) become the shouty-named HERE suite (and the equally shouty HERE Maps, HERE Drive and HERE Transit).

    So a Nokia Lumia owner will get access to all the world’s offline maps, but an OEM gets just a country licence, Halbherr explained.

    What would the platform be able to do once it had all this really big data? One example was that people would get a tip on which bar they might like after a movie. However, the very last bar I’d want to go to after a film is the bar everyone else had been tipped to go to. It would be pretty crowded, for a start, and hard to get a drink.

    But the system could provide nudging information, Halbherr said, such as advising some people to leave work early for a faster ride and tell some others to depart later. Didn’t this risk running into the problems of behaviourism, I wondered?

    The problem with this paternalistic approach is thatonce people realise they’re being manipulated, they stop responding as the system "thinks" they should. In fact, they may respond very negatively. This was a potential issue, said Halbherr, just as privacy was an issue. There had to be a strong trust relationship and not one manufacturers or service providers could abuse.

    He’s certainly mindful of the pitfalls. Halbherr cited Frommer’s as an example of something that pleased mathematicians more than users – it averaged the feedback it received, and lost personal and idiosyncratic touches. It didn’t really give very good recommendations, in his opinion.

    The mapping business at Nokia is doing very well today – bringing in #$%$400m in the last quarter – making it a significant company in its own right, and growingly rapidly. But with "real world search", Europe’s biggest tech company is launching the next epic industry battle, and Google is firmly in its sights. If it reaches even a significant fraction of Google’s web-page search revenues, then Nokia will be a significant disruptor, and a major player in its own right.

NOK
7.93-0.21(-2.58%)Jul 31 4:01 PMEDT

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