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buybackerer 99 posts  |  Last Activity: 12 hours ago Member since: Oct 7, 2004
  • It appears to be a win-win for KO , if KO is successful in making Monster a world wide brand . Most of Monster's sales are domestic , and amount to about a quarter of Red Bull's world sales . So it appears there is room to run with Monster world wide . If successful , KO's 17% stake in Monster will appreciate.

  • First , the price of oil. In theory , the lower the price of oil , the more volume MLP pipelines see from higher demand from lower gasoline prices . And two, the Kinder Morgan deal which set Wall Street off thinking the re unification of oil assets may make quality MLPs harder to find in the future, or that the premiums Kinder paid means MLPs are more valuable than their current market prices.

  • Producing aluminum in Brazil got so expensive as electricity prices surged to records this year that Alcoa Inc. (AA) idled its Pocos de Caldas smelter and now sells the facility’s power instead of metal.

    The worst drought in decades drained reservoirs used to run hydroelectric generators that supply power to extract aluminum, boosting costs already inflated by more spending on labor and transportation. Cities may be forced to ration water, and last week the government cut taxes on imported aluminum to help ease shortages as demand grows for beverage

  • NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- TheStreet Ratings team rates Alcoa Inc. (AA_) as a "buy" with a ratings score of B-.

    Shares of Alcoa are up 0.97% to $16.59 in early afternoon trading on Wednesday.

    TheStreet Ratings Team has this to say about their recommendation:

    Must Read: Warren Buffett's 25 Favorite Stocks

    Stocks TO Buy: TheStreet Quant Ratings has identified a handful of stocks that can potentially TRIPLE in the next 12 months. Learn More.

    "We rate ALCOA INC (AA) a BUY. This is driven by multiple strengths, which we believe should have a greater impact than any weaknesses, and should give investors a better performance opportunity than most stocks we cover. The company's strengths can be seen in multiple areas, such as its solid stock price performance, growth in earnings per share, good cash flow from operations and increase in net income. We feel these strengths outweigh the fact that the company has had somewhat disappointing return on equity."

  • Bank of America’s mortgage business has lost more than $50 billion since the Charlotte bank bought Countrywide Financial for $2.5 billion, according to an Observer tally, and more losses are coming in an expected Justice Department settlement.

    After announcing the deal for the ailing subprime lender in January 2008, then-Bank of America chief executive Ken Lewis called it a rare chance to become No. 1 in home loans. Instead the bank’s shareholders have spent six-plus years paying for Countrywide’s slipshod lending practices.

    The disastrous purchase not only harmed investors but also employees, homeowners and the Bank of America headquarter’s city, which had risen to national prominence as its banks spread across the country in the 1980s and 1990s.

    “It was a crippling deal for Bank of America,” said Ken Thomas, a Miami-based banking consultant, “and Bank of America is still in recovery mode because of it.”

    Former Bank of America executives say some insiders had concerns about the purchase at the time, but the bank forged ahead. Lewis has said regulators didn’t pressure him to buy Countrywide, but government officials were clearly pleased to check a problem off their list as the financial crisis was emerging.

    Since July 1, 2008, when the deal officially closed, the bank’s mortgage business has lost $52.7 billion through the first half of this year, the Observer found. This number – more than double North Carolina’s recently approved annual state budget – includes settlements, payments to investors for soured loans, accounting writedowns, and operating losses and profits. The rest of the bank made about $75 billion over the same period

    Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/08/16/5109087/the-deal-that-cost-bank-of-america.html#storylink=cpy

  • Several analysts have recently commented on the stock. Analysts at Oppenheimer raised their price target on shares of Bank of America from $19.00 to $20.00 in a research note on Monday, July 7th. They now have an “outperform” rating on the stock. Separately, analysts at Deutsche Bank upgraded shares of Bank of America from a “hold” rating to a “buy” rating in a research note on Tuesday, July 1st. They now have a $18.00 price target on the stock, up previously from $16.50. Finally, analysts at JPMorgan Chase & Co. reiterated an “overweight” rating on shares of Bank of America in a research note on Thursday, June 19th. They now have a $17.00 price target on the stock, down previously from $17.50. Six research analysts have rated the stock with a hold rating and fourteen have assigned a buy rating to the stock. The company has a consensus rating of “Buy” and an average price target of $17.53.

  • buybackerer by buybackerer Aug 15, 2014 4:06 PM Flag

    "On the heels of yesterday's opening day of $5.6 million in China, DreamWorks Animation's How to Train Your Dragon 2 soared past the $500 million mark at the global box office. The highly acclaimed sequel is now not only one of the best reviewed films of the year, but also 2014's highest grossing animated film to-date and one of the top ten grossing films of the year in any genre." Only $5.6 million? They have like 3 billion people there .I guess they don't charge $10 per person admission in China .

  • If you're a DreamWorks Animation (NASDAQ: DWA ) investor, you likely aren't happy right now. Your company has, after all, taken a huge writedown on a major film in each of the last three fiscal years.

    The pain continues, as DreamWorks posted a loss of $15 million, or $0.18 a share, for its most recent quarter. To put those struggles in context, here are five key quotes from CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg's latest conference call with analysts.

    1. How to Train Your Dragon 2 will be profitable.

    Source: DreamWorks.

    [How to Train Your Dragon 2] will be a highly profitable film for the company and will remain a very valuable franchise for many years to come.

    With only three film releases this year, DreamWorks needed a win after the disappointment of Mr. Peabody & Sherman, which was responsible for a $60 million loss. Dragon 2 provided that win, although in an uneven fashion. The film has pulled in $170 million in domestic box office revenue to date, making it unlikely to beat its predecessor's $218 million haul.

    However, the sequel is doing much better abroad, with $318 million in receipts, compared to the original's $277 million. Given that Dragon 2 still has a chance to rack up even more international sales, the movie looks set to start kicking in some solid profits starting next quarter.

    2. Diversification is our strategy, and it's expensive.


    CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg. Source: DreamWorks.

    Our company's strategic goal ... is to transition DreamWorks Animation into a global branded family entertainment company. In pursuit of this goal, 2014 is clearly an investment year for us. Our higher costs and the impact they have on the quarterly results we are reporting here today are indicative of this. ... [We] expect our spending to continue during the second half of 2014 and into next year.

    In hopes of countering some of the dramatic profit swings that come from box office hits and misses, DreamWorks is diversifying its business. To that end, the company is investing heavily in its television and consumer products divisions. For example, DreamWorks just last month hired former Disney (NYSE: DIS ) executive Mark Zoradi, who helped build the Disney Channel, as its new chief operating officer. These investments are hurting profits this year and should drag on earnings next year as well, according to Katzenberg.

    3. Our movies will be cheaper -- but not yet.

    Reducing our film production cost remains a key area of focus for us. However, the decision to adjust our film slate does have production cost implications for both Penguins of Madagascar and Home. We now believe that both films will have production costs of approximately $135 million.

    To lower the hurdle on profitability, management two years ago announced a new goal of lowering per-film development costs from $145 million to $120 million. Unfortunately, investors haven't seen the fruits of that strategy yet, and DreamWorks' next two films will each cost about as much to produce as Rise of the Guardians did back in 2012.

    4. Don't expect more than three feature films a year from us.
    When asked during the conference call whether lower film costs will eventually allow DreamWorks to expand its limited production pace, Katzenberg said no:

    We feel that the flexibility of two or three films a year is the right scale and the right value for us, particularly as we continue to diversify the company. ... I would not expect to see more than three titles a year out of us in the near future.

    5. It's been a rough summer for movies, but the industry will bounce back.

    It has not been a stellar summer by any account. But I would feel very confident of looking at 2015 and, in particular, 2016, and I would be very comfortable making a sizable bet that you'll see maybe unprecedented opportunity in the movie business. So these are the cycles of the movie business. I know it makes all of you that have to follow this business incredibly challenged here, if not sometimes cranky. It's not a lot of fun on our side, I have to say. But this is the nature of the movie business. And we are in a bit of a dip in it ... it's a cyclical issue.

    Katzenberg is right to stress that the movie business is in a rut. Overall receipts through July were down about 7% from the prior year, indicating that the lull isn't specific to DreamWorks' films. Still, investors have to hope that the tide starts to turn back in the company's favor over the next few years, at least until it can lessen its reliance on just a handful of feature films to make or break its fiscal year.

    Your cable company is scared, but you can get rich
    You know cable's going away. But do you know how to profit? There's $2.2 trillion out there to be had. Currently, cable grabs a big piece of it. That won't last. And when cable falters, three companies are poised to benefit. Click here for their names. Hint: They're not Netflix, Google, and Apple.





    From: The Motley Fool
    Subject: Dear China, it's over...
    Read This Message


    Demitrios Kalogeropoulos owns shares of Apple and Netflix. The Motley Fool recommends Apple, DreamWorks Animation, Google (A and C shares), and Netflix. The Motley Fool owns shares of Apple, Google (A and C shares), and Netflix. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.


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    If you're a DreamWorks Animation (NASDAQ: DWA ) investor, you likely aren't happy right now. Your company has, after all, taken a huge writedown on a major film in each of the last three fiscal years.

    The pain continues, as DreamWorks posted a loss of $15 million, or $0.18 a share, for its most recent quarter. To put those struggles in context, here are five key quotes from CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg's latest conference call with analysts.

    1. How to Train Your Dragon 2 will be profitable.

    Source: DreamWorks.

    [How to Train Your Dragon 2] will be a highly profitable film for the company and will remain a very valuable franchise for many years to come.

    With only three film releases this year, DreamWorks needed a win after the disappointment of Mr. Peabody & Sherman, which was responsible for a $60 million loss. Dragon 2 provided that win, although in an uneven fashion. The film has pulled in $170 million in domestic box office revenue to date, making it unlikely to beat its predecessor's $218 million haul.

    However, the sequel is doing much better abroad, with $318 million in receipts, compared to the original's $277 million. Given that Dragon 2 still has a chance to rack up even more international sales, the movie looks set to start kicking in some solid profits starting next quarter.

    2. Diversification is our strategy, and it's expensive.


    CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg. Source: DreamWorks.

    Our company's strategic goal ... is to transition DreamWorks Animation into a global branded family entertainment company. In pursuit of this goal, 2014 is clearly an investment year for us. Our higher costs and the impact they have on the quarterly results we are reporting here today are indicative of this. ... [We] expect our spending to continue during the second half of 2014 and into next year.

    In hopes of countering some of the dramatic profit swings that come from box office hits and misses, DreamWorks is diversifying its business. To that end, the company is investing heavily in its television and consumer products divisions. For example, DreamWorks just last month hired former Disney (NYSE: DIS ) executive Mark Zoradi, who helped build the Disney Channel, as its new chief operating officer. These investments are hurting profits this year and should drag on earnings next year as well, according to Katzenberg.

    3. Our movies will be cheaper -- but not yet.

    Reducing our film production cost remains a key area of focus for us. However, the decision to adjust our film slate does have production cost implications for both Penguins of Madagascar and Home. We now believe that both films will have production costs of approximately $135 million.

    To lower the hurdle on profitability, management two years ago announced a new goal of lowering per-film development costs from $145 million to $120 million. Unfortunately, investors haven't seen the fruits of that strategy yet, and DreamWorks' next two films will each cost about as much to produce as Rise of the Guardians did back in 2012.

    4. Don't expect more than three feature films a year from us.
    When asked during the conference call whether lower film costs will eventually allow DreamWorks to expand its limited production pace, Katzenberg said no:

    We feel that the flexibility of two or three films a year is the right scale and the right value for us, particularly as we continue to diversify the company. ... I would not expect to see more than three titles a year out of us in the near future.

    5. It's been a rough summer for movies, but the industry will bounce back.

    It has not been a stellar summer by any account. But I would feel very confident of looking at 2015 and, in particular, 2016, and I would be very comfortable making a sizable bet that you'll see maybe unprecedented opportunity in the movie business. So these are the cycles of the movie business. I know it makes all of you that have to follow this business incredibly challenged here, if not sometimes cranky. It's not a lot of fun on our side, I have to say. But this is the nature of the movie business. And we are in a bit of a dip in it ... it's a cyclical issue.

    Katzenberg is right to stress that the movie business is in a rut. Overall receipts through July were down about 7% from the prior year, indicating that the lull isn't specific to DreamWorks' films. Still, investors have to hope that the tide starts to turn back in the company's favor over the next few years, at least until it can lessen its reliance on just a handful of feature films to make or break its fiscal year.

    Your cable company is scared, but you can get rich
    You know cable's going away. But do you know how to profit? There's $2.2 trillion out there to be had. Currently, cable grabs a big piece of it. That won't last. And when cable falters, three companies are poised to benefit. Click here for their names. Hint: They're not Netflix, Google, and Apple.





    From: The Motley Fool
    Subject: Dear China, it's over...
    Read This Message


    Demitrios Kalogeropoulos owns shares of Apple and Netflix. The Motley Fool recommends Apple, DreamWorks Animation, Google (A and C shares), and Netflix. The Motley Fool owns shares of Apple, Google (A and C shares), and Netflix. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.


    Read/Post Comments (0) | Recommend This Article (0)

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    Profile

    Demitrios Kalogeropoulos
    TMFSigma

    Demitrios covers consumer goods and media companies for Fool.com, as well as broader moves in the economy.
    .



    Today's Market

    updated Moments ago

    Sponsored by:

    Knowledge. Support. Transparent Pricing. More reasons to say I'm with Scottrade. Click to learn more!


    DOW 16,575.96 5.98 0.04%
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    2.The New Silicon Valley
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    Related Tickers

    8/12/2014 10:30 AM

    DWA $20.36 Up +0.27 +1.34%
    DreamWorks Animati… CAPS Rating: ****
    .




    .


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    The pain continues, as DreamWorks posted a loss of $15 million, or $0.18 a share, for its most recent quarter. To put those struggles in context, here are five key quotes from CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg's latest conference call with analysts.

    1. How to Train Your Dragon 2 will be profitable.

    Source: DreamWorks.

    [How to Train Your Dragon 2] will be a highly profitable film for the company and will remain a very valuable franchise for many years to come.

    With only three film releases this year, DreamWorks needed a win after the disappointment of Mr. Peabody & Sherman, which was responsible for a $60 million loss. Dragon 2 provided that win, although in an uneven fashion. The film has pulled in $170 million in domestic box office revenue to date, making it unlikely to beat its predecessor's $218 million haul.

    However, the sequel is doing much better abroad, with $318 million in receipts, compared to the original's $277 million. Given that Dragon 2 still has a chance to rack up even more international sales, the movie looks set to start kicking in some solid profits starting next quarter.

    2. Diversification is our strategy, and it's expensive.


    CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg. Source: DreamWorks.

    Our company's strategic goal ... is to transition DreamWorks Animation into a global branded family entertainment company. In pursuit of this goal, 2014 is clearly an investment year for us. Our higher costs and the impact they have on the quarterly results we are reporting here today are indicative of this. ... [We] expect our spending to continue during the second half of 2014 and into next year.

    In hopes of countering some of the dramatic profit swings that come from box office hits and misses, DreamWorks is diversifying its business. To that end, the company is investing heavily in its television and consumer products divisions. For example, DreamWorks just last month hired former Disney (NYSE: DIS ) executive Mark Zoradi, who helped build the Disney Channel, as its new chief operating officer. These investments are hurting profits this year and should drag on earnings next year as well, according to Katzenberg.

    3. Our movies will be cheaper -- but not yet.

    Reducing our film production cost remains a key area of focus for us. However, the decision to adjust our film slate does have production cost implications for both Penguins of Madagascar and Home. We now believe that both films will have production costs of approximately $135 million.

    To lower the hurdle on profitability, management two years ago announced a new goal of lowering per-film development costs from $145 million to $120 million. Unfortunately, investors haven't seen the fruits of that strategy yet, and DreamWorks' next two films will each cost about as much to produce as Rise of the Guardians did back in 2012.

    4. Don't expect more than three feature films a year from us.
    When asked during the conference call whether lower film costs will eventually allow DreamWorks to expand its limited production pace, Katzenberg said no:

    We feel that the flexibility of two or three films a year is the right scale and the right value for us, particularly as we continue to diversify the company. ... I would not expect to see more than three titles a year out of us in the near future.

    5. It's been a rough summer for movies, but the industry will bounce back.

    It has not been a stellar summer by any account. But I would feel very confident of looking at 2015 and, in particular, 2016, and I would be very comfortable making a sizable bet that you'll see maybe unprecedented opportunity in the movie business. So these are the cycles of the movie business. I know it makes all of you that have to follow this business incredibly challenged here, if not sometimes cranky. It's not a lot of fun on our side, I have to say. But this is the nature of the movie business. And we are in a bit of a dip in it ... it's a cyclical issue.

    Katzenberg is right to stress that the movie business is in a rut. Overall receipts through July were down about 7% from the prior year, indicating that the lull isn't specific to DreamWorks' films. Still, investors have to hope that the tide starts to turn back in the company's favor over the next few years, at least until it can lessen its reliance on just a handful of feature films to make or break its fiscal year

    [How to Train Your Dragon 2] will be a highly profitable film for the company and will remain a very valuable franchise for many years to come.

    With only three film releases this year, DreamWorks needed a win after the disappointment of Mr. Peabody & Sherman, which was responsible for a $60 million loss. Dragon 2 provided that win, although in an uneven fashion. The film has pulled in $170 million in domestic box office revenue to date, making it unlikely to beat its predecessor's $218 million haul.

    However, the sequel is doing much better abroad, with $318 million in receipts, compared to the original's $277 million. Given that Dragon 2 still has a chance to rack up even more international sales, the movie looks set to start kicking in some solid profits starting next quarter.

    2. Diversification is our strategy, and it's expensive.


    CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg. Source: DreamWorks.

    Our company's strategic goal ... is to transition DreamWorks Animation into a global branded family entertainment company. In pursuit of this goal, 2014 is clearly an investment year for us. Our higher costs and the impact they have on the quarterly results we are reporting here today are indicative of this. ... [We] expect our spending to continue during the second half of 2014 and into next year.

    In hopes of countering some of the dramatic profit swings that come from box office hits and misses, DreamWorks is diversifying its business. To that end, the company is investing heavily in its television and consumer products divisions. For example, DreamWorks just last month hired former Disney (NYSE: DIS ) executive Mark Zoradi, who helped build the Disney Channel, as its new chief operating officer. These investments are hurting profits this year and should drag on earnings next year as well, according to Katzenberg.

    3. Our movies will be cheaper -- but not yet.

    Reducing our film production cost remains a key area of focus for us. However, the decision to adjust our film slate does have production cost implications for both Penguins of Madagascar and Home. We now believe that both films will have production costs of approximately $135 million.

    To lower the hurdle on profitability, management two years ago announced a new goal of lowering per-film development costs from $145 million to $120 million. Unfortunately, investors haven't seen the fruits of that strategy yet, and DreamWorks' next two films will each cost about as much to produce as Rise of the Guardians did back in 2012.

    4. Don't expect more than three feature films a year from us.
    When asked during the conference call whether lower film costs will eventually allow DreamWorks to expand its limited production pace, Katzenberg said no:

    We feel that the flexibility of two or three films a year is the right scale and the right value for us, particularly as we continue to diversify the company. ... I would not expect to see more than three titles a year out of us in the near future.

    5. It's been a rough summer for movies, but the industry will bounce back.

    It has not been a stellar summer by any account. But I would feel very confident of looking at 2015 and, in particular, 2016, and I would be very comfortable making a sizable bet that you'll see maybe unprecedented opportunity in the movie business. So these are the cycles of the movie business. I know it makes all of you that have to follow this business incredibly challenged here, if not sometimes cranky. It's not a lot of fun on our side, I have to say. But this is the nature of the movie business. And we are in a bit of a dip in it ... it's a cyclical issue.

    Katzenberg is right to stress that the movie business is in a rut. Overall receipts through July were down about 7% from the prior year, indicating that the lull isn't specific to DreamWorks' films. Still, investors have to hope that the tide starts to turn back in the company's favor over the next few years, at least until it can lessen its reliance on just a handful of feature films to make or break its fiscal year

  • buybackerer by buybackerer Aug 11, 2014 2:27 PM Flag

    •Dreamworks' struggle to successfully introduce new film franchises is hitting the company hard.
    •After three of its last four movies crashed, Dreamworks is lowering its cost basis for new releases, in order to give them a better chance of making money.
    •The multifaceted approach to franchise success is weak, as mixed results undermine the strategy of the company.
    •Why the underperforming "How to Train Your Dragon 2" is such a disaster.

    The last time I wrote about Dreamworks Animation (NASDAQ:DWA) the company offered up a plausible strategy which, if successfully executed, gave it a chance to turn itself around. It even had some momentum at the time.

    My concerns were it was in danger of outpacing its fundamentals, and that has proven to be true. Dreamworks is attempting to grow itself into a conglomerate like its peers; attempting to leverage its franchises through a number of distribution outlets. So far, those results are mixed, and undermined by the fact the company is struggling to introduce new franchises, and as confirmed by its "How to Train Your Dragon 2" performance, is in danger of vastly underperforming its existing franchises.

    Since Dragon 2 won't come close to expectations, it generates the question of what type of legs its other franchises have under them, as Dragon 2 was released under optimal conditions, and the usual bounce associated with the second in a series didn't come about.

    If it can't identify solid new film franchises and its existing franchises underperform, Dreamworks Animation is going to struggle to not only gain traction, but to hold itself where it's at.

    About the only thing it has going for itself is it has fallen so far in share price, most of the bad news is already baked into the price. The underperformance of Dragon 2 will have an effect on how much the share price will go up, not if it will, in my opinion.

    The performance of Dreamworks over the years have been extremely volatile, pointing to the fact it hasn't been able to provide a foundational base to work from, which means even though it has had a string of feature film hits at one time, it isn't able to leverage that into a consistent revenue stream. Until it is able to do so, the company will remain extremely volatile, although for those finding good entry points, the company can generate significant returns.

    It's on the downside of a freefall now, suggesting it may be coming to a place where it is ready to get a nice bounce. While Dragon 2 points to the possibility that bounce may not be as high as in the past, it's still going to make some money, just not near as much as hoped for.

    Over the longer term, if one of two of its next franchises underperform, we'll likely see the share price dropping again into the mid-teens. In the next

  • buybackerer by buybackerer Aug 11, 2014 2:20 PM Flag

    29-Jul-14 FBR Capital Initiated DWA Mkt Perform

  • NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- As media conglomerates pair up (or at least attempt to), DreamWorks Animation (DWA_) is one of the few independents to be left on its lonesome to tackle waning interest in blockbuster films, animated or otherwise.

    On the surface, DreamWorks appears to be an attractive takeover target. Its annual revenue hover around $707 million and it has a string of successful franchises including Shrek and The Croods that are likely to continue racking up sales through consumer products, licensing and home entertainment.

    But after two quarters of losses far wider than expected, the family animation studio is now trading at its cheapest level ever. In its most recent second quarter, DreamWorks reported a net loss of 18 cents a share compared to losses of 2 cents a share expected by analysts, leading shares to crater more than 11% over Wednesday's session. Year to date, the stock has lost more than a third of its value, cratering 43.7% to $19.98 compared to the S&P 500's 6.6% gain.

    Read More: DreamWorks Is The First Casualty of the Sumer Box Office Slump

    Courting a deal would surely benefit DreamWorks. "As an independent studio, there could be more synergies as part of a larger media company, both on the production and distribution side," argued S&P Capital IQ's Tuna Amobi, who retained a "buy" rating, in a phone interview.

    But, DreamWorks' intrinsic value is countered by a lack of demand. Television properties and merchandising opportunities aside, the company's performance is still primarily tied to how its films fare at the box office.

    DreamWorks' head of public relations, Allison Rawlings, declined to comment on whether the company would be open to M&A activity.

    Weakness at the box office has plagued DreamWorks over the past several quarters. A quarter earlier, the Glendale, Calif.-based studio reported a net loss of 51 cents a share, more than three times wider than the analyst consensus, due to a $57 million impairment charge on its March release of Mr. Peabody & Sherman.

    Its summer 2013 film Turbo also saw disappointing results domestically, generating only $83 million in U.S. and Canadian markets. The company took a $13.5 million write-down in February for that movie, the accounting for which is currently under SEC investigation.



    Read More: Target's Woes Won't End Even If It Dumps Canada Operations

    If industry talk is to be believed, DreamWorks has flirted with the idea of a takeover before. "Although it was kept very quiet at the time, we're certain that CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg put the company up for sale two years ago and there were no buyers," Topeka Capital Markets' David Miller (who maintained a "hold" rating and $23 price target) told TheStreet.

    Cowen & Company's Doug Creutz added he heard rumors as early as 2010, recalling, "They couldn't find any buyers back then and that was when their economics of their film business looked a lot better than they did now."

    Therein lies the problem for DreamWorks. Though it has had several successful franchises in a relatively short history, albeit without the level of consistency Pixar has enjoyed, there isn't a market for movie studios at the moment.

  • buybackerer by buybackerer Aug 11, 2014 2:09 PM Flag

    Time Warner suggested it has room to grow in consumer products. That could mean selling toys based on characters from DC Comics, just as Disney has done with its properties. But such moves are easier said than done. DreamWorks Animation, for instance, has tried to boost its business with toy sales but that strategy has barely moved the needle.

  • buybackerer by buybackerer Aug 11, 2014 1:47 PM Flag

    ConocoPhillips (NYSE:COP)‘s stock had its “buy” rating reiterated by stock analysts at Argus in a report issued on Thursday. They currently have a $92.00 price target on the stock, up from their previous price target of $90.00. Argus’ price target suggests a potential upside of 13.12% from the company’s current price

  • buybackerer by buybackerer Aug 11, 2014 1:38 PM Flag

    For Jeffrey Katzenberg, the studio’s co-founder and CEO, the probe and class-action interest could prove especially tough to shake.

    He sold more than $1.24 million of his company’s stock on two separate occasions in October and November, SEC filings show.

    The first batch commanded $27.84 per share, the second $32.17. And don’t think it’s lost on class-action seekers that both prices look good in comparison to the $20 or so that a DreamWorks share fetches today.

  • buybackerer by buybackerer Aug 11, 2014 1:36 PM Flag

    SEC probe lingers over DreamWorks Animation • 8:11 AM
    •A SEC probe into DreamWorks Animation (NASDAQ:DWA) over the slow timing of its write-off on Turbo continues to linger over the company.
    •On top of the government investigation, several class action shareholders lawsuits are off and running.
    •Drawing some notice are the stock sales by CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg last October and November - several months after Turbo's release, but before the writedown announcement.

  • Reply to

    Best Investment in the the retail sector

    by blaird7476 Jul 22, 2014 1:16 PM
    buybackerer buybackerer Aug 8, 2014 12:04 PM Flag

    Well, everything you say has some truth , but overly exaggerated. Companies buy back shares , as you say , to improve earnings per share. Theoretically higher earnings for each share makes them more valuable since each share actually is making more money. And , as you say , it makes management look like they are doing a good job , but it is quite possible to create the illusion of increased earnings per share through buybacks even when revenues and net income are falling . But that is usually afforded companies like URBN , which generate a lot of cash and do not have to borrow to do so. When a company's shares are on sale , as are URBN's , and they have positive free cashflow, like URBN , it makes sense to buyback shares at the bottom instead of buying at the top , as most companies do. Buying the dip is a cheap way for management to help stockholder value in the short run.

  • Reply to

    Wait til China opening of Dragon 2

    by getshorty559 Aug 4, 2014 12:20 PM
    buybackerer buybackerer Aug 7, 2014 12:27 PM Flag

    Are we subject to the same distribution deal with Fox and movie theatres in China? In the states we know that for a $100 million plus production , the first $300 million goes to covering all costs . It would be nice to make some money on these film efforts . And one more serious question. If eventually a DWA movie is going to make money , why do they write them down so quickly and early in their world wide release ?

  • buybackerer by buybackerer Aug 6, 2014 10:48 AM Flag

    Federal Reserve green lights resubmitted BofA capital plan

  • mean more oil though put for MLPs . Often , lower oil and gasoline prices are enough to spur an increase in demand , and that in turn increases volumes through MLP pipelines. Theoretically , the more volume transported , the more money MLPs make.

  • The price of oil is no doubt the reason COP has sold off. And while COP will get almost $9 a barrel less in the short term , the lower oil prices will ultimately result with COP selling greater volumes as cheaper oil translates to the gas pump and consumers start buying more gas. Consumers will have more disposable income to spend on discretionary. A cut in oil and gas prices is , in effect ,a tax break for consumers . These price cuts eventually complete a vicious circle for oil , when increased demand for cheap oil starts to put pressure on crude prices once again.

GME
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