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L & L Energy, Inc. Message Board

coo2002coo99 350 posts  |  Last Activity: Apr 24, 2015 12:31 PM Member since: Sep 29, 2009
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  • coo2002coo99 coo2002coo99 Apr 24, 2015 12:31 PM Flag

    Please see below the failure of Exubera:
    The promise: Billed as a potential blockbuster replacement to painful injections, former Pfizer CEO Henry McKinnell called Exubera "a major medical breakthrough," predicting that the drug would annual sales of $1.5 billion in 2010. Pfizer was so confident in its blockbuster potential, that days before approval, the company paid $1.4 billion to Sanofi-Aventis for its share of the drug. After less than two years, the inhaled insulin product captured just 1 percent of the insulin market--despite heavy advertising.

    What went wrong: Part of the drug's failing was its extremely large drug delivery device, which was the size of a can of tennis balls and inconvenient for patients to carry. Pfizer had counted on patients' aversion to needles to boost Exubera sales, but diabetes needles have become so tiny that most users have no problem with self-injection. There were also concerns about possible dosing errors due to the difference between doses of the inhalable formula versus traditional insulin. Finally, insurers and NICE were underwhelmed by Exubera's cost effectiveness, noting that it was no more effective than existing treatments despite the higher price.

    After spending hundreds of millions to develop the drug, Pfizer announced in October 2007 that it would stop manufacturing the drug. "Despite our best efforts, Exubera has failed to gain the acceptance of patients and physicians," said Pfizer CEO Jeffrey Kindler. The company was forced to take a $2.8 billion charge when it wrote off the drug, including $661 million of Exubera inventory. When Pfizer made its decision, three other inhalable insulin drugs were under development; only Mannkind is still in the race, persuing development of Afrezza.

  • coo2002coo99 coo2002coo99 Apr 24, 2015 11:48 AM Flag

    How many % of our soldiers are on battlefields today?

  • coo2002coo99 coo2002coo99 Apr 24, 2015 11:47 AM Flag

    When is the drug approved by Tricare?

  • Reply to

    Question

    by y456145 Apr 24, 2015 11:05 AM
    coo2002coo99 coo2002coo99 Apr 24, 2015 11:08 AM Flag

    Not that I know of for now.

  • coo2002coo99 coo2002coo99 Apr 24, 2015 10:24 AM Flag

    The promise: Billed as a potential blockbuster replacement to painful injections, former Pfizer CEO Henry McKinnell called Exubera "a major medical breakthrough," predicting that the drug would annual sales of $1.5 billion in 2010. Pfizer was so confident in its blockbuster potential, that days before approval, the company paid $1.4 billion to Sanofi-Aventis for its share of the drug. After less than two years, the inhaled insulin product captured just 1 percent of the insulin market--despite heavy advertising.

    What went wrong: Part of the drug's failing was its extremely large drug delivery device, which was the size of a can of tennis balls and inconvenient for patients to carry. Pfizer had counted on patients' aversion to needles to boost Exubera sales, but diabetes needles have become so tiny that most users have no problem with self-injection. There were also concerns about possible dosing errors due to the difference between doses of the inhalable formula versus traditional insulin. Finally, insurers and NICE were underwhelmed by Exubera's cost effectiveness, noting that it was no more effective than existing treatments despite the higher price.

    After spending hundreds of millions to develop the drug, Pfizer announced in October 2007 that it would stop manufacturing the drug. "Despite our best efforts, Exubera has failed to gain the acceptance of patients and physicians," said Pfizer CEO Jeffrey Kindler. The company was forced to take a $2.8 billion charge when it wrote off the drug, including $661 million of Exubera inventory. When Pfizer made its decision, three other inhalable insulin drugs were under development; only Mannkind is still in the race, persuing development of Afrezza.

  • Reply to

    Finger on the buy button....

    by alohazabel Apr 20, 2015 9:40 AM
    coo2002coo99 coo2002coo99 Apr 20, 2015 9:41 AM Flag

    My dry powder is ready!

  • coo2002coo99 coo2002coo99 Apr 20, 2015 9:34 AM Flag

    Do you have the link to it?

  • coo2002coo99 coo2002coo99 Apr 20, 2015 1:30 AM Flag

    Thank you.

  • coo2002coo99 by coo2002coo99 Apr 18, 2015 3:24 AM Flag

    Is your DTC campaign working? New program tracks viewers from TV to pharmacy - By Emily Wasserman

    Imagine you're a pharma marketer shrouded by an invisibility cloak. You can see when someone views your latest ad campaign on television, and then follow them to the doctor's office or even the pharmacy when they pick up their meds. A new initiative from Nielsen Catalina Solutions and marketing analytics firm Crossix Solutions aims to do just that, helping pharma marketers craft more targeted campaigns by anonymously measuring TV viewership in real time and tracking prescription purchases.
    Nielsen Catalina and Crossix's new program, dubbed "AdVantics Rx," follows audiences as they watch ads on TV, and then determines whether a consumer visits a doctor or buys a prescription based on the ads they were watching. The approach allows marketers to determine which television slots are most effective for advertising, and to weed out ad placements that don't yield the desired Rx numbers, Dan Stein, senior vice president of analytics services & product strategy, told FiercePharmaMarketing. Nielsen will bring its TV expertise and metrics to the table, including actual purchase data from more than 70 million shoppers, while Crossix will analyze the data to help pharma companies improve their ad campaigns.
    "Our data allows advertisers to better understand which parts of their campaign are more effective in reaching their intended audiences, based on relevant health behavioral data" Stein said. "And then advertisers can make the critical link between the audiences reached and the campaign's incremental impact from a sales and ROI perspective."
    The program could help marketers spend ad budgets more wisely, and help tweak campaigns as they roll out. fiercepharmamarketingDOTcom/story/your-dtc-campaign-working-new-program-tracks-viewers-tv-pharmacy/2014-10-21?utm_medium=nl&utm_source=internal

  • Reply to

    Mnkd Management is as shady as they come

    by greatbalsy Apr 17, 2015 12:40 PM
    coo2002coo99 coo2002coo99 Apr 17, 2015 12:50 PM Flag

    Go meet the crooks on May 21.

  • Reply to

    No More Needles For Many Type 2 Diabetics?

    by luckyshoe Apr 17, 2015 12:26 PM
    coo2002coo99 coo2002coo99 Apr 17, 2015 12:39 PM Flag

    correction: It's not on twitter. It's on the Diabetes Mine

  • Reply to

    No More Needles For Many Type 2 Diabetics?

    by luckyshoe Apr 17, 2015 12:26 PM
    coo2002coo99 coo2002coo99 Apr 17, 2015 12:37 PM Flag

    There is a guy who did not mention if he was typeI or 2, left a reply on Amy's twitter as follow:

    Replaced Apidra with Afrezza 3 days ago, and WOW! Afrezza is a very different creature!! Two big observations already:

    1) Afrezza seems to have an odd, stabilizing effect for me. In 5 years of insulin use, I've never seen so many sets of consistent numbers.

    2) It also seems to clear out of the blood faster than any bolus insulin I've tried. Seemingly as fast as 90 minutes.

    Amy's term of Ridiculously Imprecise is perfect. Most of my Apidra doses were between 1.5 and 3.5 units, so having 4 units as the minimum dose was a little intimidating. But I've only been low once in 3 days - big improvement! And that mistake seems to be from taking Afrezza before eating, when I was already almost normal - dropped from 143 to 57 in 30 minutes. Was back up to 145 within 90 minutes, then 135, 120, 126 over the next 4 hours.

    I also had one high streak that seemed odd. Turns out It was probably a result of me mis-handling the loaded inhaler, and / or inhaling it wrong. Seems I wasn't very careful to hold the inhaler right side up after it was loaded, AND perhaps I was also sucking too hard on the inhaler, coating the back of my throat as much as filling my lungs. I started at 77, ate rice and broccoli, and didn't think I'd need a bolus dose. An hour later I was 220, so I took a 4-unit hit - only my second dose of Afrezza. Two hours later I was 248, then 281, then 237. Seems likely that little or none of the Afrezza actually made it into my lungs.

    Yesterday was my 3rd day on Afrezza - and one of the most stable days of my 5 years with insulin. Clearly much more to learn and understand, but so far I'm greatly encouraged!

    Pretty encouraging.

  • Reply to

    Week Eleven Comparison

    by neil36 Apr 17, 2015 9:44 AM
    coo2002coo99 coo2002coo99 Apr 17, 2015 9:51 AM Flag

    Cost of advertising is greater than sample packs?

  • Reply to

    china will devour afrezza

    by charles_lacy2003 Apr 17, 2015 12:55 AM
    coo2002coo99 coo2002coo99 Apr 17, 2015 3:11 AM Flag

    They inhale what others exhale like everyone else in heavily polluted cities, towns in China.

  • Reply to

    To all shorts

    by spring_is_pretty Apr 17, 2015 12:04 AM
    coo2002coo99 coo2002coo99 Apr 17, 2015 1:40 AM Flag

    Looking forward, the RBC analyst, Adnan Butt, identified three potential catalysts for the stock:

    1. European Union filing plans in 2015 in which MannKind will count on Sanofi SA (NYSE: SNY) for an MAA filing where visibility on approval would be a positive.

    2. Afrezza post-approval study details as timelines have implications for label expansion.

    3. Launch trajectory over the next 12-18 months.

    These are the challenges shorts are facing, in addition to FDA approval of 12-u cartridge, commencement of production of line 2 & 3, DTC in 3Q, receipt of other milestone payment(s) from SNY, announcement of other TS application(s) ....

    Most "good news" of MNKD that shorts looking for have been discounted, certainly there may be a couple more missing. So shorts ought to create unrealistic expectation for longs and bash the stock later.

  • coo2002coo99 coo2002coo99 Apr 16, 2015 11:58 AM Flag

    SNY did not halt Afrezza. It's all your speculation out of fantasy.

  • Reply to

    Texas Society of Health-System Pharmacists

    by kimi_held Apr 16, 2015 9:30 AM
    coo2002coo99 coo2002coo99 Apr 16, 2015 9:46 AM Flag

    Thanks for the info.

  • Reply to

    Anybody hear how this meeting/presentation went?

    by amstelytle Apr 15, 2015 11:23 PM
    coo2002coo99 coo2002coo99 Apr 16, 2015 2:20 AM Flag

    Sounds like most people know what this amazing Afrezza can help their pts and complain this drug being too slow to reach them.

  • Reply to

    Go read the dayofdiabetes link on Twitter

    by stocktraderforgain Apr 15, 2015 11:52 AM
    coo2002coo99 coo2002coo99 Apr 16, 2015 2:16 AM Flag

    To me, stock appreciation of MNKD is good but not as good as those pts who have been so caring about each others, learning, sharing and appreciating what Afrezza has changed their life (at least for the daily meal times). Truly have not hat off to them and wish them well!

  • coo2002coo99 coo2002coo99 Apr 16, 2015 1:56 AM Flag

    I think this may not happen until another clinical trial is completed, right?

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