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LG Display Co., Ltd. Message Board

ddseoul2 657 posts  |  Last Activity: Jun 21, 2011 4:45 PM Member since: Feb 18, 2005
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  • LG rolls out world’s fastest color printer
    2011-06-21 18:55
    http://www.koreaherald.com/business/Detail.jsp?newsMLId=20110621000781

    LG Electronics said on Tuesday it would roll out the world’s fastest A4 color desktop printer, able to print up to 60 pages per minute, this month.

    In a press conference held in downtown Seoul, the global electronics giant said it joined hands with global player Memjet to release the product “Machjet LPP6010N” in the local market.

  • http://www.tradingmarkets.com/news/stock-alert/aapl_ssnjy_samsung-lg-display-key-suppliers-to-apple-s-new-ipad-892321.html
    06 Apr 2010
    LG Display provided the 9.7-inch light-emitting diode (LED) backlit display, which is the most expensive part of the touch-based computing device.

    "IPS technology has a much better viewing angle and touch technology than VA technology, and therefore Apple chose TFT LCD using IPS," John So, an analyst at Shinhan Investment Corp. wrote in a report dated Monday.

    "Among the top five LCD panel companies in the world, LG Display is the only one that has the IPS technology."

    The iPad's initial sales have far exceeded market forecasts, likely reaching 700,000 units, according to Bloomberg's report, which cited Gene Munster, an analyst at Piper Jaffray & Co. That compares with the iPhone's initial sales of 270,000 units.

  • ddseoul2 ddseoul2 Nov 12, 2009 4:16 PM Flag

    Someone must know something!
    See SORL website, pretty cool.
    http://www.sorl.cn/

  • http://online.wsj.com/article/SB125732757764927689.html
    NOVEMBER 5, 2009

    Combined operating profits at Japan's nine major consumer and industrial electronics makers for the most recent quarter were $1.7 billion.

    Alone, South Korea's Samsung Electronics earned over twice that.

  • Samsung Now Bigger Than Nine of Japan’s Major Electronics Companies
    November 5, 2009

    http://www.rjkoehler.com/2009/11/05/samsung-now-bigger-than-nine-of-japans-major-electronics-companies/

    The Wall Street Journal reports that Samsung Electronics’ operating profit, at $3.14 billion, is more than two times larger than the combined operating profit of nine of Japan’s largest consumer electronic companies.

    Samsung now has a $7.4 billion war chest to spend on growth and R&D where many of the Japanese companies are at an operating loss (Sony) or in huge debt (Hitachi)

  • Hyundai Santa Fe Hits 2 Million Sales Mark
    http://english.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2009/11/05/2009110500783.html

    Hyundai Motor on Tuesday announced that its Santa Fe mid-size crossover SUV has reached the two-million mark in total global sales. Launched in June 2000, the Santa Fe became the first SUV to hit the 500,000 mark in domestic sales in May this year.

  • POSCO Builds Plant in California
    http://english.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2009/11/04/2009110400781.html
    Nov. 04, 2009 12:31 KST

    Korea's biggest steelmaker POSCO has built a plant in Pittsburg, California. The company on Monday said the plant, a joint venture with United States Steel and another Korean steelmaker, SeAH Steel, will annually produce 270,000 tons of high-end steel pipes used for oil transport. The U.S. is the world's largest market for such steel pipes.

    Named United Spiral Pipe, the plant will make steel plates up to 25.4 mm in thickness to make pipes approved by the American Petroleum Institute. North America accounts for more than 20 percent of the global demand for oil transport. The region annually uses more than 2 million tons of steel pipes with diameters over 24 inches.

  • KEPCO Returns to Profit for YTD
    Nov. 04, 2009 10:16 KST
    http://english.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2009/11/04/2009110400504.html
    The Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO) on Tuesday announced operating profit of W1.607 trillion in the third quarter, returning to the black in terms of accumulated earnings for the year (US$1=W1,182).

    The power monopoly posted a 10 percent increase in sales on-year in the quarter to W9.33 trillion and W931.1 billion in net profit.

  • Korean Firms Capture One Third of Global LCD TV Market
    http://english.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2009/11/04/2009110400500.html

    Korean companies are taking a long lead over their Japanese rivals in the global LCD TV market. Samsung Electronics and LG Electronics achieved a combined 33.4 percent share of the world market in the third quarter, against a combined 17.4 percent for Sony and Sharp, according to market researcher DisplaySearch on Tuesday. Korea boosted its market share by 2.8 percentage points from the previous quarter while Japan remained at a standstill.

    Samsung sold 6.9 million LCD TVs in the July to September period, achieving a 21.1 percent market share and breaking its previous record of 20.5 percent in the second quarter of last year. Its sales for the first nine months of the year totaled 17.6 million units, over one million units more than the combined sales of Sony and Sharp, which sold 9.8 million units and 6.71 million units respectively in the same period.

    LG Electronics, which overtook Sony as the world's second largest TV maker in the second quarter, sold 4.01 million LCD TVs in the third quarter with its record market share of 12.3 percent.

  • 1.Mirosofe
    2.IBM
    3.Samsung
    http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=aAFXzaSPoqII&refer=home
    Samsung Posts Surprise Gain in Profit on Chips, LCDs

  • Don't miss CNN TODAY-Special Program "Eye on South Korea" from 13-21.
    Korea the Mecca of Information Technology-
    http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/2007/news/south.korea/index.html
    CNN takes an in-depth look at how South Korea is leading the rest of the world into the future!!
    Linked by high-speed broadband lines and blanketed by wireless signals capable of sending HDTV to tiny cell phones, South Korea is the world's most wired-and wireless--country.

    *Future tech and puppy love in South Korea
    hhttp://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/ptech/10/01/eosk.futuretech/index.html
    By Kristie LuStout-CNN

    SEOUL, South Korea (CNN) -- With its anonymous skyline and mind-numbing traffic, Seoul may not seem like a sci-fi city. And yet it's blazing one very high-tech trail.

    A DMB (Digital Multimedia Broadcasting) phone is shown for "Ubiquitous Digital Life" on March 30, 2005.

    It's where hardcore online gamers get paid as professionals. It's where social networking, in the form of the incredibly successful Cyworld, has been abuzz since 1999 -- predating both Facebook and MySpace.

    It's also where watching live television on your mobile is an everyday habit. And try not to stare when you see it. "DMB phones," as they're known, are so 2005.

    These days, consumers are getting ready for the launch of the BluEye by SK Telecom -- a matchbook-sized projector that simply plugs into your handset to screen mobile videos.

    They're also gearing up for the LG Viewty, a high-feature camera phone that shoots videos at 120 frames per second and, in certain markets, uploads the video to YouTube with a single click.

    This is the land where tomorrow reigns, as local consumers are all too willing to flaunt the next new thing.

    Sanjin Lee, Director of the Ministry of Information and Communication (read: South Korea's I.T. czar), tells me that Koreans are simply "impatient" and have "I.T. DNA."

    This gotta-have-it technolust has in turn forced the government to deliver the future.

    For starters, the government has set up the "Ubiquitous Dream Hall" -- a dreamily named showcase of the future home, complete with robot butler and a refrigerator that orders any missing food items on the spot.

    The networked fridge has been a long-predicted feature (if not clich) in the South Korean future home -- a feature that, both in and outside the country, really has yet to become a reality.
    But such forward thinking has transformed South Korea from one of the poorest countries in Asia to an advanced high-tech economy that's home to major tech firms like Samsung and LG, as well as the most wired population on the planet.

    The country boasts more than 30 million mobile subscribers out of a population of around 49 million, and more than three quarters of Korean homes enjoy blazingly fast broadband.

    Always-on Internet, mobile TV, viral video projectors -- it's enough to inspire a bad case of techno envy. And yet the one geek souvenir I wanted so desperately to bring back home was neither fast nor wireless.

    It was the "puppy couch Sotoro" -- a (for lack of a better way to put it) furry dog robot couch that whimpers when it's upset.

    Sotoro settles down only when you take a seat and stroke its brown fuzzy "arms" -- a delightfully offbeat piece of technology that I never thought I needed.

  • Tech capitals of the world
    http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2007/06/16/1181414598292.html
    Other Asian cities such as Singapore, Tokyo and Hong Kong are hot on Seoul's tail.

    Nine out of 10 residents also have mobile phones. Leading gadget-makers Samsung and LG have headquarters in Seoul and pump out a steady stream of the latest toys, which residents quickly adopt.

    Seoul also pioneered convergence. Digital mobile TV broadcasting, or Digital Multimedia Broadcasting, was launched in South Korea in 2005 and nearly 2 million Koreans now use the service to watch TV on their phones while riding trains and buses.

    The story illustrates Seoul's top spot among the world's digital cities. Stephen Quinn, associate professor in communication studies at Deakin University, visited Seoul in April. "You still see people walking about reading print newspapers, using origami to fold broadsheets to the size of a paperback novel. But you also see people surfing the internet on tiny laptops while on the subway, which travels about half a kilometre underground."

  • Don't miss CNN TODAY-Special Program "Eye on South Korea" from 13-21.
    Korea the Mecca of Information Technology-
    ttp://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/2007/news/south.korea/index.html
    CNN takes an in-depth look at how South Korea is leading the rest of the world into the future!!
    Linked by high-speed broadband lines and blanketed by wireless signals capable of sending HDTV to tiny cell phones, South Korea is the world's most wired-and wireless--country.

    *Future tech and puppy love in South Korea
    http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/ptech/10/01/eosk.futuretech/index.html
    By Kristie LuStout-CNN

    SEOUL, South Korea (CNN) -- With its anonymous skyline and mind-numbing traffic, Seoul may not seem like a sci-fi city. And yet it's blazing one very high-tech trail.

    A DMB (Digital Multimedia Broadcasting) phone is shown for "Ubiquitous Digital Life" on March 30, 2005.

    It's where hardcore online gamers get paid as professionals. It's where social networking, in the form of the incredibly successful Cyworld, has been abuzz since 1999 -- predating both Facebook and MySpace.

    It's also where watching live television on your mobile is an everyday habit. And try not to stare when you see it. "DMB phones," as they're known, are so 2005.

    These days, consumers are getting ready for the launch of the BluEye by SK Telecom -- a matchbook-sized projector that simply plugs into your handset to screen mobile videos.

    They're also gearing up for the LG Viewty, a high-feature camera phone that shoots videos at 120 frames per second and, in certain markets, uploads the video to YouTube with a single click.

    This is the land where tomorrow reigns, as local consumers are all too willing to flaunt the next new thing.

    Sanjin Lee, Director of the Ministry of Information and Communication (read: South Korea's I.T. czar), tells me that Koreans are simply "impatient" and have "I.T. DNA."

    This gotta-have-it technolust has in turn forced the government to deliver the future.

    For starters, the government has set up the "Ubiquitous Dream Hall" -- a dreamily named showcase of the future home, complete with robot butler and a refrigerator that orders any missing food items on the spot.

    The networked fridge has been a long-predicted feature (if not clich) in the South Korean future home -- a feature that, both in and outside the country, really has yet to become a reality.
    But such forward thinking has transformed South Korea from one of the poorest countries in Asia to an advanced high-tech economy that's home to major tech firms like Samsung and LG, as well as the most wired population on the planet.

    The country boasts more than 30 million mobile subscribers out of a population of around 49 million, and more than three quarters of Korean homes enjoy blazingly fast broadband.

    Always-on Internet, mobile TV, viral video projectors -- it's enough to inspire a bad case of techno envy. And yet the one geek souvenir I wanted so desperately to bring back home was neither fast nor wireless.

    It was the "puppy couch Sotoro" -- a (for lack of a better way to put it) furry dog robot couch that whimpers when it's upset.

    Sotoro settles down only when you take a seat and stroke its brown fuzzy "arms" -- a delightfully offbeat piece of technology that I never thought I needed.

  • Tech capitals of the world
    http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2007/06/16/1181414598292.html
    Other Asian cities such as Singapore, Tokyo and Hong Kong are hot on Seoul's tail.

    Nine out of 10 residents also have mobile phones. Leading gadget-makers Samsung and LG have headquarters in Seoul and pump out a steady stream of the latest toys, which residents quickly adopt.

    Seoul also pioneered convergence. Digital mobile TV broadcasting, or Digital Multimedia Broadcasting, was launched in South Korea in 2005 and nearly 2 million Koreans now use the service to watch TV on their phones while riding trains and buses.

    The story illustrates Seoul's top spot among the world's digital cities. Stephen Quinn, associate professor in communication studies at Deakin University, visited Seoul in April. "You still see people walking about reading print newspapers, using origami to fold broadsheets to the size of a paperback novel. But you also see people surfing the internet on tiny laptops while on the subway, which travels about half a kilometre underground."

  • Don't miss CNN TODAY-Special Program "Eye on South Korea" from 13-21.
    Korea the Mecca of Information Technology-
    http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/2007/news/south.korea/index.html
    CNN takes an in-depth look at how South Korea is leading the rest of the world into the future!!
    Linked by high-speed broadband lines and blanketed by wireless signals capable of sending HDTV to tiny cell phones, South Korea is the world's most wired-and wireless--country.

    *Future tech and puppy love in South Korea
    http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/ptech/10/01/eosk.futuretech/index.html
    By Kristie LuStout-CNN

    SEOUL, South Korea (CNN) -- With its anonymous skyline and mind-numbing traffic, Seoul may not seem like a sci-fi city. And yet it's blazing one very high-tech trail.

    A DMB (Digital Multimedia Broadcasting) phone is shown for "Ubiquitous Digital Life" on March 30, 2005.

    It's where hardcore online gamers get paid as professionals. It's where social networking, in the form of the incredibly successful Cyworld, has been abuzz since 1999 -- predating both Facebook and MySpace.

    It's also where watching live television on your mobile is an everyday habit. And try not to stare when you see it. "DMB phones," as they're known, are so 2005.

    These days, consumers are getting ready for the launch of the BluEye by SK Telecom -- a matchbook-sized projector that simply plugs into your handset to screen mobile videos.

    They're also gearing up for the LG Viewty, a high-feature camera phone that shoots videos at 120 frames per second and, in certain markets, uploads the video to YouTube with a single click.

    This is the land where tomorrow reigns, as local consumers are all too willing to flaunt the next new thing.

    Sanjin Lee, Director of the Ministry of Information and Communication (read: South Korea's I.T. czar), tells me that Koreans are simply "impatient" and have "I.T. DNA."

    This gotta-have-it technolust has in turn forced the government to deliver the future.

    For starters, the government has set up the "Ubiquitous Dream Hall" -- a dreamily named showcase of the future home, complete with robot butler and a refrigerator that orders any missing food items on the spot.

    The networked fridge has been a long-predicted feature (if not clich) in the South Korean future home -- a feature that, both in and outside the country, really has yet to become a reality.
    But such forward thinking has transformed South Korea from one of the poorest countries in Asia to an advanced high-tech economy that's home to major tech firms like Samsung and LG, as well as the most wired population on the planet.

    The country boasts more than 30 million mobile subscribers out of a population of around 49 million, and more than three quarters of Korean homes enjoy blazingly fast broadband.

    Always-on Internet, mobile TV, viral video projectors -- it's enough to inspire a bad case of techno envy. And yet the one geek souvenir I wanted so desperately to bring back home was neither fast nor wireless.

    It was the "puppy couch Sotoro" -- a (for lack of a better way to put it) furry dog robot couch that whimpers when it's upset.

    Sotoro settles down only when you take a seat and stroke its brown fuzzy "arms" -- a delightfully offbeat piece of technology that I never thought I needed.

  • Tech capitals of the world
    http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2007/06/16/1181414598292.html
    Other Asian cities such as Singapore, Tokyo and Hong Kong are hot on Seoul's tail.

    Nine out of 10 residents also have mobile phones. Leading gadget-makers Samsung and LG have headquarters in Seoul and pump out a steady stream of the latest toys, which residents quickly adopt.

    Seoul also pioneered convergence. Digital mobile TV broadcasting, or Digital Multimedia Broadcasting, was launched in South Korea in 2005 and nearly 2 million Koreans now use the service to watch TV on their phones while riding trains and buses.

    The story illustrates Seoul's top spot among the world's digital cities. Stephen Quinn, associate professor in communication studies at Deakin University, visited Seoul in April. "You still see people walking about reading print newspapers, using origami to fold broadsheets to the size of a paperback novel. But you also see people surfing the internet on tiny laptops while on the subway, which travels about half a kilometre underground."

  • Posco Partners With Indian Steelmaker
    http://english.chosun.com/w21data/html/news/200708/200708170025.html

    POSCO, the world's fourth largest steelmaker, has entered into a strategic partnership with Steel Authority of India Ltd., or SAIL, India's largest state-run steel maker.

    According to an announcement from POSCO at SAIL's headquarters in Delhi on Thursday, POSCO's Vice President Cho Sung-sik and SAIL's personnel director signed a memorandum of understanding for a strategic partnership.

    POSCO Vice President Cho Sung-sik (fourth from left) and SAIL Executive Director of Personnel and Administration Ganatantra Ojha shake hands after signing an MOU for a strategic partnership. SAIL Chairman Sushil Kumar Roongta is the second person from left. /Yonhap

    Both parties will share management techniques including management information, enterprise resource planning (ERP) and Six Sigma practices over the next three years.

    The two companies will also work together to develop and buy raw materials and share sales network in India. The partnership does not include joint stock ownership or joint research of steelmaking technology.

    SAIL is a state-run steelmaker with an annual production capacity of 15 million tons across six mills in India. The Indian government holds an 86 percent stake.

    POSCO expects the partnership will lead to a breakthrough in its project to build a steel mill in India, which has stalled because of opposition from local residents and delays by the Indian government.

    POSCO said the partnership in the future could lead to cooperation in developing steelmaking technology and joint projects.

    (englishnews@chosun.com )

  • Samsung to Release New Blogging Phone

    http://english.chosun.com/w21data/html/news/200707/200707110029.html
    Samsung Electronics will launch in Europe this month its Mobile Blog 3G Phone (SGH-L760), which allows users to upload content directly to blog sites on the Internet.

    The phone is expected to further fuel the current boom in mobile Internet and user-created content services, as it can upload directly to popular UCC sites like YouTube, Ublog and Buzznet

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