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Toshiba Corporation Message Board

ericjones12398 19 posts  |  Last Activity: Jun 21, 2012 4:29 PM Member since: Apr 2, 2012
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  • Supercomputers, initially developed by Seymour Cray in the 1960s, were originally used to assist scientists with nuclear physics research. These complex systems, back then and today, are classified as ""dual-use"" by many governing bodies -- including the United States Federal government -- which means that they have both civilian and military application. Because of these dual capabilities, countries do not strive to have the title of the world's fastest supercomputer simply for bragging rights, but because it is imperative for reasons of national security.
    According to NNSA Administrator Thomas D'Agostino, ""Computing platforms like Sequoia help the United States keep its nuclear stockpile safe, secure and effective without the need for underground testing"" and ""give us increased confidence in the nation's nuclear deterrent as the weapons stockpile changes under treaty agreements.""
    Article: http://www.patexia.com/feed/ibm-s-sequoia-and-the-politics-of-dual-use-supercomputers-20120621

  • Among technology's previous generation of Next Big Things, we heard a lot of talk about the potential of NFC (Near-Field Communication). Smartphone manufacturers were excited enough to start putting NFC on over 40 production models in 2011 alone -- despite the fact that there were very few real-world applications. Google tried to jump-start NFC with an ambitious Google Wallet project, and Samsung's recently unveiled TecTiles hopes to make app-loving users excited about the possibilities.

    First, the basics. NFC is a form of RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) that operates in an extremely short range. NFC devices need to be (almost) close enough to touch, which reduces but does not eliminate external interference -- intentional, or otherwise. Unlike the similar Bluetooth specification, the NFC connection does not require pairing; any two devices can make a connection. http://www.patexia.com/feed/the-nfc-finals-google-wallet-vs-tectiles-20120615

  • Among technology's previous generation of Next Big Things, we heard a lot of talk about the potential of NFC (Near-Field Communication). Smartphone manufacturers were excited enough to start putting NFC on over 40 production models in 2011 alone -- despite the fact that there were very few real-world applications. Google tried to jump-start NFC with an ambitious Google Wallet project, and Samsung's recently unveiled TecTiles hopes to make app-loving users excited about the possibilities.

    First, the basics. NFC is a form of RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) that operates in an extremely short range. NFC devices need to be (almost) close enough to touch, which reduces but does not eliminate external interference -- intentional, or otherwise. Unlike the similar Bluetooth specification, the NFC connection does not require pairing; any two devices can make a connection.
    http://www.patexia.com/feed/the-nfc-finals-google-wallet-vs-tectiles-20120615

  • In the first of three press releases this morning, increasingly in-trouble Nokia revealed a "range of planned actions aimed at sharpening its strategy, improving its operating model and returning the company to profitable growth." The company emphasized focused investment on core areas of their business, particularly their line of Lumia smartphones and on providing location-based services. As much as they try to hide it, the glaring aspect of this press release remains the fact that Nokia is hemorrhaging assets in an attempt to stay afloat, exemplified by another 10,000 global job cuts -- after which Nokia will have cut nearly one-third of its pre-2010 workforce. http://www.patexia.com/feed/plot-thickens-nokia-sheds-another-10-000-jobs-20120614

  • The current leaders of this new phase of the personal computing revolution are Apple and Google. Apple makes the iPhone, the world’s most popular and profitable smartphone, and the iPad, the dominant tablet computing device. Google develops and oversees Android, the operating system that already powers about 300 million smartphones. Google also develops and manages the Chrome operating system which powers Chromebooks, netbook-like personal computing devices.
    Likewise, Apple has sold approximately 300 million of its post-PC devices, the iPhone, iPad and to a lesser extent, their iPod Touch. All powered by their iOS operating system. Apple is on pace to sell approximately 240 million iOS devices this year. This number is telling. Microsoft, long the dominant player in the “PC” market sold 240 million licenses of its Windows 7 operating system the first year of release (and a total of about 500 million over the past two years). We are witnessing a sea change not only in personal computing but in the market leaders.
    http://www.patexia.com/feed/the-rise-of-the-pc-and-the-fall-of-the-hardware-spec-20120602

  • The cyber-security community has given Flame mixed reviews after preliminary attempts to dissect the spying malware’s bloated code. Kaspersky Lab called Flame “one of the most complex threats ever discovered.” Symantec and McAfee were more reserved, seeing enough similarities between Flame’s sophistication and past sibling cyber attacks – Stuxnet and Duqu – to throttle concerns the Internet is doomed. But as competing security outfits debate the origin, species and pervasive threat of the virus, all agree on a short list of nations capable of directing such grandiose espionage. Iran's unrepentant nature and doomsday attitude serve only to fuel speculation. Stuxnet, Duqu and now Flame, all aimed at Iran and all spooky reminders of today's silent theater of war. The cyber-attack stage is no longer novel, but the deeper cyber-security analysts cut into Flame, the more different it becomes. http://su.pr/1yl8wC

  • ericjones12398 by ericjones12398 May 30, 2012 12:10 PM Flag

    The news first turned up in an Intel press release -- the Chromebook and Chromebox will feature Intel processors. The Chromebook, now in its fifth generation, still promises simple, fast laptop computing with streamlined access to all Google's cloud services. The new Chromebox, starting at $329, promises the same in a compact home/office CPU box. Will these new releases help Google and the Chrome OS break out of its rather esoteric consumer base and into the spheres of Mac, Windows, and Linux influence? http://www.patexia.com/feed/google-intel-release-new-chrome-based-pcs-20120529

  • The news first turned up in an Intel press release -- the Chromebook and Chromebox will feature Intel processors. The Chromebook, now in its fifth generation, still promises simple, fast laptop computing with streamlined access to all Google's cloud services. The new Chromebox, starting at $329, promises the same in a compact home/office CPU box. Will these new releases help Google and the Chrome OS break out of its rather esoteric consumer base and into the spheres of Mac, Windows, and Linux influence? http://www.patexia.com/feed/google-intel-release-new-chrome-based-pcs-20120529

  • Done deal. After approval from the EU and US reviewers, was there much doubt that Google's acquisition of Motorola Mobility would run aground in China? Now that the marriage is consummated, those of us outside the honeymoon suite can only guess at the fun that the two companies are having together. But more importantly, we can only guess at the progeny of such a seemingly mismatched couple.
    Fewer Employees, Fewer Products? We know for a fact that new Motorola Mobility CEO Woodside feels that Motorola makes far too many models of phones. Perhaps "any" is too many for a company that knows next to nothing about hardware manufacturing. Maybe what many have speculated and Google has denied is true: the acquisition was all about IP, and the only hardware that Google plans to wield is an axe.
    http://www.patexia.com/feed/google-s-motorola-what-will-opposites-attract-20120525

  • Alcatel-Lucent introduced its 7950 XRS router this week, addressing the ever-evolving needs of today’s core networks invaded by video, mobile devices and cloud-based services. Alcatel-Lucent aims to break the core router duopoly created by Cisco and Juniper, and then tap into a $4 billion dollar market. With 100G Ethernet ports, a 400G FP3 processor and an elegant power-saving design, the Paris-based hardware maker wants to “modernize the global backbone of the Internet.” Verizon is applauding. But are enough service providers willing – in such a critical area – to give Alcatel-Lucent their core networks based simply on performance specs.
    It’s a tough racket. Grizzled, entrenched and highly methodical, the core router market will be difficult for ALU to penetrate, even with a top-shelf product.
    http://www.patexia.com/feed/alcatel-lucent-prepares-a-new-core-router-for-battle-20120524

  • Alcatel-Lucent introduced its 7950 XRS router this week, addressing the ever-evolving needs of today’s core networks invaded by video, mobile devices and cloud-based services. Alcatel-Lucent aims to break the core router duopoly created by Cisco and Juniper, and then tap into a $4 billion dollar market. With 100G Ethernet ports, a 400G FP3 processor and an elegant power-saving design, the Paris-based hardware maker wants to “modernize the global backbone of the Internet.” Verizon is applauding. But are enough service providers willing – in such a critical area – to give Alcatel-Lucent their core networks based simply on performance specs.
    It’s a tough racket. Grizzled, entrenched and highly methodical, the core router market will be difficult for ALU to penetrate, even with a top-shelf product.
    http://www.patexia.com/feed/alcatel-lucent-prepares-a-new-core-router-for-battle-20120524

  • Cloud computing has been a buzzworthy trend for so long that it's now simply a movement in progress. Our files and apps are rapidly migrating from our hard drives to distributed servers, leaving behind only a few jealously guarded and resource-intensive tasks that must be kept local. Crucial, vital tasks... such as Skyrim, or StarCraft 2, or Diablo 3...
    Look under the hood of half the machines running these games, and you'll find Nvidia. Well, "half" is inaccurate; Nvidia currently accounts for about 17% of the PC video market plus every PS3, while rival AMD shows up in the Xbox 360, the Nintendo Wii, and gets about 25% of PCs. The big video winner is Intel, due to integrated virtual GPU, but we'll get to that later. http://www.patexia.com/feed/virtual-nvidia-it-s-all-fun-games-until-someone-loses-a-gpu-20120522

  • Cloud computing has been a buzzworthy trend for so long that it's now simply a movement in progress. Our files and apps are rapidly migrating from our hard drives to distributed servers, leaving behind only a few jealously guarded and resource-intensive tasks that must be kept local. Crucial, vital tasks... such as Skyrim, or StarCraft 2, or Diablo 3...
    Look under the hood of half the machines running these games, and you'll find Nvidia. Well, "half" is inaccurate; Nvidia currently accounts for about 17% of the PC video market plus every PS3, while rival AMD shows up in the Xbox 360, the Nintendo Wii, and gets about 25% of PCs. The big video winner is Intel, due to integrated virtual GPU, but we'll get to that later. http://www.patexia.com/feed/virtual-nvidia-it-s-all-fun-games-until-someone-loses-a-gpu-20120522

  • Google-maps-loving iPhone users get ready: starting with iOS 6, you won’t be able to open your iPhone fresh out of the box and start up Google Maps. After months of carefully purchasing mapping companies, Apple is ready to unveil its own mapping application. While it won’t change the way you drive, the new mystery app promises to be the next “wow!” gadget.

    Apple’s been snapping up mapping application companies for the last several years. It started in 2009 when One Infinity Loop got Placebace, followed by Poly9 in 2010 and the purchase of C3 Technologies toward the end of 2011. Still, Apple hadn’t yet rolled out its mapping application, leaving industry insiders and fanboys alike in rap speculation about what the House of Jobs was preparing for the post-Jobs era.
    http://www.patexia.com/feed/iphone-maps-google-is-out-apple-is-in

  • Companies today are increasingly dependent upon Information Technology to deliver innovative products and services to customers,” said Boyd Davis, vice president and general manager of the Datacenter Infrastructure Group at Intel. “To satisfy the increasing diversity of IT needs and workloads, Intel is excited to offer additional processor options to enterprises of all sizes with the Intel Xeon processor E5-4600/2400 and E3-1200 v2 product families. Our new products feature the flexibility, value and performance that businesses demand in a market that is ever less tolerant of compromise. We are also continuing to drive momentum in the micro server market by introducing new lower power processors within the Intel Xeon processor E3-1200 v2 product family.
    http://www.patexia.com/feed/intel-reveals-line-of-xeon-chips

  • ericjones12398 by ericjones12398 May 13, 2012 11:14 AM Flag

    Toshiba invented NAND flash twenty five years ago. Today, flash memory is used in iPhones and iPads, and a myriad of mobile gadgets used by hundreds of millions of people -- at least -- around the world. Still a leader in flash memory, Toshiba continues pushing forward. The company recently received a patent for a ReRAM device that may soon replace both NAND flash and DRAM. ReRAM (or RRAM, for resistive random-access memory) is a non-volatile memory type developed independently by several companies, including Toshiba, HP and others.
    The market for ReRAM is heating up. In January, Japanese firm Elpida publicly claimed it had a working ReRAM prototype that was capable of switching state at 10 nanoseconds -- the equivalent to DRAM. The company is working with Sharp to develop ReRAM chips for commercial use in 2013, although this may be impacted by persistent reports that the financially strapped Elpida will merge with Micron Technology. Numerous other companies are similarly building out their capabilities for ReRAM. Sony, Samsung, Panasonic, Micron and others are working to commercialize ReRAM. According to the EE Times, SanDisk recently let slip its interest in ReRAM by placing a job ad on its website for a ReRAM expert. Panasonic recently announced plans to go into production of ReRAM chips and HP has stated their intention to develop ReRAM-based products within the next couple of years.
    http://www.patexia.com/feed/is-the-age-of-reram-upon-us-

  • Although the actual release of CPU chips these days includes about as much surprise as the New York Yankees being in the playoff chase, Intel managed to surprise industry experts recently with its new Ivy Bridge chip.
    The primary laptop processor chip makers – Intel, AMD, and ARM – have widely leaked roadmaps and analyst days where they reveal all of the features of the chips well ahead of the release date. Intel’s recently released Ivy Bridge family of CPUs followed that suit. Most of the chip’s features were known well ahead of the release, including a shrink in the manufacturing process, which allowed Intel to squeeze 1.4 billion transistors onto a quad-core die that’s about 26% smaller than its processor from last year, Sandy Bridge.

    Link to the Original Source: http://www.patexia.com/feed/intel-s-new-chip-bridges-graphics-gap-4083

  • Toshiba Corp. will be developing an electric-powered bus with a charge time of just five minutes. In cooperation with Tokyo’s Minato Ward, the electronics giant will retrofit small buses owned by the ward with its new lithium-ion cells and motors. http://www.patexia.com/feed/toshiba-to-make-electric-bus-with-5-minute-charge-3939

  • GE has built up an arsenal of solutions to tackle energy problems lately. The company’s flexible power plants like FlexEfficiency 50 or jet-fired aeroderivative systems can ramp up and replace lost electricity in just minutes. GE engineers and researches have also developed efficient solar technologies like thin film panels, advanced batteries, smart grid and other high-tech tools that smooth the ebb and flow of electricity and make it reliable.
    http://www.patexia.com/feed/taking-charge-from-batteries-to-flexible-power-ge-technology-bulks-up-the-backbone-of-the-grid-3594

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