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Neuralstem, Inc. Message Board

errico51 69 posts  |  Last Activity: Apr 18, 2014 1:55 PM Member since: Sep 16, 2004
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  • Reply to

    Article about Lanza/ACTC

    by jjhallseven2 Apr 18, 2014 1:21 PM
    errico51 errico51 Apr 18, 2014 1:55 PM Flag

    Good find. Thanks

  • errico51 errico51 Apr 10, 2014 1:29 PM Flag

    More then 2 years ago but always valuable

  • FINDINGS: Controlled hESC differentiation resulted in greater than 99% pure RPE. The cells displayed typical RPE behaviour and integrated into the host RPE layer forming mature quiescent monolayers after transplantation in animals. The stage of differentiation substantially affected attachment and survival of the cells in vitro after clinical formulation. Lightly pigmented cells attached and spread in a substantially greater proportion ( 90%) than more darkly pigmented cells after culture. After surgery, structural evidence confirmed cells had attached and continued to persist during our study. We did not identify signs of hyperproliferation, abnormal growth, or immune mediated transplant rejection in either patient during the first 4 months. Although there is little agreement between investigators on visual endpoints in patients with low vision, it is encouraging that during the observation period neither patient lost vision. Best corrected visual acuity improved from hand motions to 20/800 (and improved from 0 to 5 letters on the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study [ETDRS] visual acuity chart) in the study eye of the patient with Stargardt's macular dystrophy, and vision also seemed to improve in the patient with dry age-related macular degeneration (from 21 ETDRS letters to 28).

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Reply to

    Great NEWS!!

    by spngtrooper Apr 10, 2014 7:18 AM
    errico51 errico51 Apr 10, 2014 7:34 AM Flag

    It's true. Only old news.

  • Reply to

    Great NEWS!!

    by spngtrooper Apr 10, 2014 7:18 AM
    errico51 errico51 Apr 10, 2014 7:26 AM Flag

    Where did you find trooper?

  • Robert Lanza: hESC-RPE transplantation in rodents is safe and improves visual acuity in AMD models. Clinical trials started. #KSstemcell

    Robert Lanza: focus on the eye (AMD) for regenerative medicine with allogeneic stem cells #KSstemcell

  • errico51 errico51 Apr 7, 2014 11:19 AM Flag

    I strongly believe that Dr Lanza's science and technology will win and so will be for ACTC. Keep calm out there

    Sentiment: Buy

  • Workshop 2: Clinical Progress for Stem Cell Therapies. Organized in collaboration with California Institute for April 9th: Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) 14:30—16:30
    Workshop 2: Clinical Progress for Stem Cell Therapies. Organized in collaboration with California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM)
    Grand Sierra AB
    * Ellen Feigal, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine - CIRM, USA
    Eva L. Feldman, University of Michigan, USA
    Intraspinal Stem Cell Transplantation in ALS: Results of a Phase I Clinical Trial
    Robert Lanza, Advanced Cell Technology, USA
    ES- and iPS-Derived Cells for Clinical Trials
    Philip D. Gregory, Sangamo BioSciences, Inc., USA
    Genome Editing with Zinc Finger Nucleases: A Novel Apporach to HIV Therapy
    Kevin A. D'Amour, ViaCyte, Inc., USA
    Development of an Encapsulated Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Diabetes
    Tracy C. Grikscheit, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, USA
    Defining the Function of Tissue-Engineered Intestine Generated from Human Postnatal Progenitor Cells in a Murine Model

  • Reply to

    GOOGLE THE NEWS

    by errico51 Apr 4, 2014 3:56 AM
    errico51 errico51 Apr 4, 2014 8:08 AM Flag

    Not permitted on Yahoo Board. Write same words I suggested on Google

  • Google stem cells Harvard NEW hope and read.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • errico51 by errico51 Apr 4, 2014 3:56 AM Flag

    For immediate release: state lawmakers in three states vote unanimously to allow terminal patients experimental drug access, cut fda red tape

    Sentiment: Buy

  • Reply to

    APRIL BLOG PART 1 - AMAZING

    by errico51 Apr 4, 2014 1:24 AM
    errico51 errico51 Apr 4, 2014 2:41 AM Flag

    APRIL BLOG PART 3
    I have a couple of things I need to get off of my chest – literally. Shortly after my next Emory appointment coming up soon, I’ll be having breast reduction surgery. So I brought it up in this post. I’ll tell you more about how it all came to be next time. This is not an, I want this surgery for cosmetic reasons. It will improve my daily life now and certainly in the future. If you look at my photos page, you will see some of me at about 100 lbs. My breasts may not look large there. Even then I went to great measures to strap them in. I’m larger there than I look. This is all for another post.
    I’ll probably update several things I haven’t lately since I’ve been so focused on my stem cell results. I will mention any changes though.
    Just a few days ago, 3/28, made one year having my blog which was one year after my local neurologist told me about ALS after an EMG and sent me for confirmation with neurologists specializing in ALS. One was Emory ALS Center, where I chose to stay. One of the best choices of my life. If you haven’t already, please read about my experience being diagnosed with ALS. You can find it under, About Me/My Diagnosis Experience.
    Thank you for taking the time to read my blog. I will be back with more.
    Until next time, take care,
    April

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Reply to

    APRIL BLOG PART 1 - AMAZING

    by errico51 Apr 4, 2014 1:24 AM
    errico51 errico51 Apr 4, 2014 2:36 AM Flag

    PART 2
    Am I as I was before surgery? No, but if I stayed here, even if just with my upper body and breathing, I can certainly continue to adapt to this. There is no doubt I’ve been set back to earlier progression. I’m coming up on six months after surgery and just discovered my returned finger snapping ability, so there’s no doubt it was worth it to me. Lets work fast on giving everyone the opportunity I’ve had.
    I’ve gone on enough about my results. It’s bitter-sweet posting about it. I know you all facing ALS want to be happy with me and others known to benefit. I also know you and your loved ones naturally wish it was happening to you right now. I feel the need to apologize, but inside I know that’s not what you want, and I know many of you appreciate the experience coming from a patients perspective. I thank you all for reading, and allowing me to tell about it as much, if not more, than you appreciate reading it. Thank you to all my readers facing this terrible disease and sending me encouragement. I truly believe we’re in this together and never forget, we’re stronger in numbers and that means a lot when we need to band together for something we all believe in. I have a feeling this study will be continued rightly and swiftly, I’m on the team if we need to make sure the FDA hears us in the States. I’m on the global ALS team as well.
    I’m coming up on six months post surgery and with that I have another surgery coming up. It’s not ALS related so I wasn’t going to mention it. It does affect my life with ALS so I’m choosing to share it. My treating neurologist has given his approval understanding it is truly a quality of life issue for me. I don’t need to take any risks waiting. There will still be extra precautions taken for the surgery since I do have ALS. It won’t be a non-hospital, walk out surgery. I have a very competent surgeon and it will be performed in a hospital. I planned to bring it up in my next post but now I can’t just leave you hanging.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Most people snap their fingers without thought and don’t lose the ability. If the ability is lost due to a disease like ALS, it doesn’t return. I lost that ability because of weakened muscles in my right hand. Hey ALS: I can do it again – Oh Snap! I could still snap my left side but it was getting more difficult before surgery. Now my left hand is almost as good as before ALS. Every new little discovery of something I get back is like a magical moment for me.
    Sometimes I think back to before surgery. My husband and I discussed it quite a bit. The risks and just how invasive it is. In my mind I always knew I would go forward with it. When you have ALS, it’s hard to turn anything down, because you know what’s ahead. Looking back before surgery, when I was constantly being told of the risks, including waking up completely paralyzed or possibly not wake up, it’s easier to think, wow, I had no hesitation? Having this offered for any other condition, I would have passed. I wasn’t about to let any opportunity against this disease pass me by and I’m so glad I didn’t let it pass as well as thankful for being lucky enough to have the choice.
    I hope more than once daily that this study gets the go ahead to be sped up and approved for more people to be injected. Every surgery is a risk and as invasive and groundbreaking as this surgery is, it has proven to be as safe. I don’t know how everyone has done with it, but I know I’m not the only one who has experienced great success from it that began in phase l. I think we need to have more people injected to have more solid proof of safety and efficacy. The sooner that’s done, more people will have this option. We’ll then need to keep observing, as now, how long the benefits last, who benefited the most and why. I hope the FDA feels the same by the time phase ll is over. We need to move right on into phase lll with a larger amount of patients.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Reply to

    Where Do You Live?

    by billistheman2000 Apr 2, 2014 5:52 PM
    errico51 errico51 Apr 3, 2014 1:12 PM Flag

    From Italy long on Cur for the last 5 years. I lost my mother for Als 15 years ago and from then I have always invested in pharma that fight against this terrible disease. Good luck to all

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Reply to

    LAST APRIL'S BLOG FIRST PART

    by errico51 Mar 11, 2014 4:20 AM
    errico51 errico51 Mar 11, 2014 4:31 AM Flag

    LAST PART:
    There are new studies and studies in stage II and III that hold promise. In Arizona the House Committee on Reform and Human Services approved, ”right to try” by a vote of 5 to 3. The bill now goes to the House Rules Committee. If approved, it will go to the full house for consideration. This is expected to pass and I would expect other states to follow. Even though it still isn’t happening fast enough for people who are dying, it is progress and I want everyone to keep hope alive and keep fighting. Even though it’s slow, there has been more progress in ALS research and other rare diseases in the last few years than ever before.

    Please believe me, I know all about bad days with ALS. I’ve had days when I just want to dare someone to tell me to be positive. These days are normal so don’t feel guilty over them. There is someone else with ALS feeling positive for you. Never give up!

    Until next time, take care,

    April

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Reply to

    LAST APRIL'S BLOG FIRST PART

    by errico51 Mar 11, 2014 4:20 AM
    errico51 errico51 Mar 11, 2014 4:22 AM Flag

    SECOND PART:
    Eating and drinking water was at the beginning stages and I was preparing for continued worsening speech and swallowing water which Tony had already started thickening because even though I was never in a real choking situation I was having more sudden coughs from feeling like it was going down wrong pretty often . It still happens once in a while now but I don’t use thickener anymore. I was noticing more trouble with coordinating the chew to swallow process. I deal with that much less and eat with more ease. It’s either a slight improvement or a complete halt of these things and staying at the point I am used to working with. I’m doing my best to explain what I’m experiencing. I have no other reason to believe this stopped or possibly improved other than participating in the Neuralstem, stem cell study. The improvement in my speech and my right hand is obvious to people who knew me before surgery. What I’m experiencing with my soft palate and tongue are much more difficult to get across, but these are very important issues regarding quality of life and even extending life. That’s why I’m attempting to explain the feeling of it and what losing these abilities mean. The ability to speak and swallow liquid and food longer is amazing to a person with ALS. A lot of the things I’m experiencing as improvement or halt of progression is not as obvious, especially to people who weren’t around me much. The people who know me all noticed improvement in speech, people can see very clearly my ability to use my right hand better. It’s hard to see and understand a soft palate stops collapsing and better tongue control. As I’ve said before I hope I’ve explained these things in an easy to understand way.

    There are a couple more things I want to mention but not until next months appointment at Emory. I have some questions myself and want some answers before I start posting about it. I still just can’t say enough how lucky I feel to have had the surgery. There are new

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • I want to touch some on life post stem cell surgery. I’m still very much enjoying the improvement in dexterity and strength in my right hand and arm. I’ve been hesitant about mentioning my arm, but the improved strength is no doubt there. I can hold a plate of food long enough to set it down only using my right side. I can play with Abby easier. I can eat and put a fork through a piece of pineapple. I could not do these thing before. I used my left hand, that had more strength. It has even improved. I can still project my voice louder and speak longer without becoming hoarse for much longer. My speech is most often very intelligible. I have a couple of things I think cause the occasional major slur, mispronouncing words here and there. One is that the right side of my tongue is still a little atrophied even though it seems stronger when moving food. The second is the roof of my mouth. You can slide your tongue along the middle roof of your mouth and feel the bony separator in the middle. The left side of mine curves up which is how it has always been. The right side only has a very slight curve up. It’s like it’s collapsing on that side. The differences in the tongue, even though it is mildly atrophied, has the sensation of being thicker. Between the tongue and the roof of mouth flattening down on that side, if not being very aware, some words will sound slurred. Other than feeling my tongue is a little stronger moving food, there seems to be no real difference in tongue or roof of mouth since surgery. This is my opinion, I haven’t been told this. I feel this was something actively progressing at a noticeable rate to me before surgery. Since surgery it seems to have just stopped.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • And no political morons

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • errico51 errico51 Feb 26, 2014 9:57 AM Flag

    More idiot are the sellers folks!. Thanks a lot for your cheap shares!

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

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