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false 15 posts  |  Last Activity: Jan 26, 2015 11:09 AM Member since: Jul 16, 2012
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  • Reply to

    Desperation?

    by du4sloop Jan 24, 2015 4:41 PM
    false false Jan 26, 2015 11:09 AM Flag

    read JesseLivermore again

  • Reply to

    NOAA says 2014 warmest year on record

    by lakeed98 Jan 19, 2015 12:33 PM
    false false Jan 19, 2015 1:38 PM Flag

    nu 1 100th (.001) of a degree with a margin of error of of .1% or over %2

  • it will backfire on him when american start getting laid off

  • Reply to

    Image of Life Space UX projector

    by adchop Jan 6, 2015 5:34 PM
    false false Jan 7, 2015 9:35 PM Flag

    It could easily be it's not SONY and that's why SONY isn't mentioned by MVIS or Celluon.....It could be it is SONY too.....So Celluon mentions MVIS who is working with SONY but doesn't violate their NDA with SONY? You could be right....we'll have to see. I'll be happy if it is SONY...just apprehensive%2

  • A Sugar Land woman is thanking the strangers who pulled her husband, 48-year-old Cathan Kirkwood, from a burning car Wednesday. "I'

  • Nobody wants to return to the kind of risky home loans that spurred 2008's banking collapse. Sliding back toward lax lending would be nuts. Yet Washington officially endorsed such loans this

  • false false Dec 23, 2014 9:21 PM Flag

    at $70,000 a script you just put revenue added to gild at $7 billion dollars for harvoni! in 2015.
    add $6 billion for sovaldi and yo

  • ...hitting resistance now and totally constipated. SCHG managers are making no changes in their lineup, viewing this as nothing to be concerned about. Dunno---don't like what I am seeing, but accept that these guys are pros and know better than I do. As for now--there are%2

  • false false Dec 23, 2014 5:06 AM Flag

    Just like everything else, you have absolutely no knowledge on this subject. I will put in interms that a child could understand, fake dogeater. Maybe a cretin like you will.

    apple pay, and if you recall googlepay, are a threat to the fee structure of the large credit card companies. In response to the threat, the large credit card companies created their own consortium with their own smart app payment system and threatened large retailers that if they did not join this consortium, favor it, and block applepay, that they would charge them higher merchant fees, and/or stop them from accepting their cards. My estimation is that some were even incentivized by even lower merchant fees.
    some retailers like walmart caved to the pressure and joined the consortium. For walmart, in particular, the idea of say, via not accepting transactions was unfathomable. Many other retailers refused to cave.%2

  • Reply to

    The real truth for Wrighspeed...

    by grkenvtech Dec 11, 2014 4:09 PM
    false false Dec 11, 2014 4:22 PM Flag

    Wrightspeed create new jobs...

    The company is hiring, and says the government money is based not just on environmental and fuel conservation goals, but for its economic potential as well.
    The grant, says the company, “will indirectly catalyze hundreds of California jobs,%2

  • false false Dec 11, 2014 12:44 PM Flag

    drgy, Myt reads your post with a certain degree of sadness. There is so much unfortunate here, Myt finds it necessary to review it.
    "We turned over POWs to the South Viet Nam "Special Forces" for interrogations. Their techniques made Marines cringe." And how did that work for them?

    "However, finding fellow Marines who were either captured or wounded, especially by VC, and were either castrated or disemboweled led many of us to not care what was done to the enemy after capture. We did to them as they did to us. Sometimes it was easier to not "capture them." " Myt does not need to remind you that GIs were similarly maltreated, but the more important point here is that war crimes are war crimes. There is no excuse for committing them.

    "You're at war and anything goes" Again, regime after regime that has woven this idea into its social fabric has always been erased from history.

  • Reply to

    Pass Nat. Gas Bill, Gas Export, Tariff on Oil

    by tnvisa Nov 30, 2014 9:32 PM
    false false Dec 1, 2014 12:55 AM Flag

    Boone Pickens is a life long republican, but he and then Sen.John Kerry, who Pickens and Aubrey McClendon of Chesapeake kept from winnng the 2004 election, crafted the energy bill. The energy bill was then KILLED by the Koch brothers and their poodle, Mitch McConnell.
    The last thing the Kochs want is for America to become energy independent, because it will cost them tens of billions of dollars, and $85 Billion in personal wealth just won't buy what it used to. Their daddy made millions during the depression by building 17 oil refineries for Stalin in the Soviet Union. Stalin then sold large quantities of fuel to Hitler when Hitler was preparing for war. In the early days of WWll, Hitler and Stalin had a non aggression pact until Hitler invaded Russia a couple of years later. The Kochs%2

  • false false Nov 28, 2014 1:53 PM Flag

    Re:The possibility that Koch Industries could be targeting OCLR as their next acquisition target is a risk issue for the shorts especially since it could happen quickly

    Why Koch industries selected OPLK over OCLR? One possible reason could be that one company delivered 15 years of profits while the other 15 years of losses. Just a small difference (smile). A lot of companies in the past, including OPLK, passed on acquiring Oclaro (formerly Bookham). Oclaro may have 100m in cash but closer scrutiny of the balance sheet shows 128M in current liabilities. Oclaro has yet to stem the huge losses (20m last quarter) and, imho, is over burdened with over priced senior management that the company cannot support. Imho, Oclaro%2

  • Reply to

    Unions

    by denny_kehoe Nov 23, 2014 12:46 PM
    false false Nov 24, 2014 9:44 PM Flag

    "Me, I'll take global warming"

    You wouldn't write that if you lived any significant amount of time in costa rica 8 ). I love ny in the winter. But maybe not if i lived in buffalo.

    Understood on the taxes, but you do realize extra income it taxed at the level of that income and not the income before it, which still receives the lower rate. That's the progressive system. Of course, if extra income makes you lose certain benefits for your other income under the tax rules then that's something different.

    When she says you might wind up in the 20-25% bracket does she mean the tax only on the added income or the average of all your income, that's the distinction you have to make. If you have to pay the extra 5% to 10% only on the divvy generated income then you might want to think twice about selling your fund.

    Only a 1% divvy for the healthcare fund? How does it match up against hqh for total return? Having hqh, you know the divvy, or do they call it distribution, i forget, paid out is much higher than that. I forget if it's 6% or 8% based, i think it's still one or the other after they started paying again. I'd rather pay more tax but get more mon

  • false by false Nov 15, 2014 9:33 PM Flag

    When New York grants its first licenses for casinos beyond Indian lands, perhaps as soon as Nov. 21, it will essentially reveal the true motivation for bringing gambling to the Empire State. If it's to help upstate towns add quality jobs and get back on their feet, as Gov. Andrew Cuomo has said, the casinos will be sited in economically depressed areas, which are far from New York City and its well-off northern suburbs. If generating tax revenue is the goal, the gambling resorts will be put within easy reach of the city's big spenders and visitors.

    Therein lies a quandary for the state commission that will recommend three or four upstate casino locations before year's end. It would be naive to assume that the governor and legislators—who appointed the panel that chose the commission members—aren't at least a little interested in the taxes that casinos will generate. The new gambling venues will give the lawmakers an opportunity to reap billions of dollars without saying they raised taxes, even though much of the money will still be coming from their constituents' pockets.

    The place where gambling companies most want to build, of course, is the city itself. A Manhattan venue would shatter revenue records, as has been demonstrated by the eye-popping numbers from the "racino" at Aqueduct Racetrack in Queens. (Racinos are not allowed to have table games and must turn over a healthy percentage of their profits to subsidize the state's ailing horse-racing industry.) But the law passed by the Legislature and the constitutional amendment approved by voters imposes a five-year ban on new casinos downstate.

    Casinos efficiently shift consumer spending from lighter-taxed activities, such as shopping and dining out, to heavier-taxed ones, such as feeding slot machines and playing roulette. Their effect on local economies is less clear. The more money casinos bring in from outsiders, the better—which is an argument for plopping them close to New York City. The farther from the city they are, the more they will rely on locals gambling away cash that would otherwise be spent elsewhere in their communities. When local spending is diverted in this way, the net benefit can be zero after the initial construction boost wanes.

    That's why casinos are a Catch-22 for New York. The counties that most need economic stimulus are the ones that would benefit least from casinos, because they are far from downstate's population and tourism centers.

    Depressing? You bet.

    A version of this article appears in the November 17, 2014, print issue of Crain's New York Business.

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    What a deal! $729 per night for a hotel roomHaul of FameDefine fair, Mr. Mayor

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    When New York grants its first licenses for casinos beyond Indian lands, perhaps as soon as Nov. 21, it will essentially reveal the true motivation for bringing gambling to the Empire State. If it's to help upstate towns add quality jobs and get back on their feet, as Gov. Andrew Cuomo has said, the casinos will be sited in economically depressed areas, which are far from New York City and its well-off northern suburbs. If generating tax revenue is the goal, the gambling resorts will be put within easy reach of the city's big spenders and visitors.

    Therein lies a quandary for the state commission that will recommend three or four upstate casino locations before year's end. It would be naive to assume that the governor and legislators—who appointed the panel that chose the commission members—aren't at least a little interested in the taxes that casinos will generate. The new gambling venues will give the lawmakers an opportunity to reap billions of dollars without saying they raised taxes, even though much of the money will still be coming from their constituents' pockets.

    The place where gambling companies most want to build, of course, is the city itself. A Manhattan venue would shatter revenue records, as has been demonstrated by the eye-popping numbers from the "racino" at Aqueduct Racetrack in Queens. (Racinos are not allowed to have table games and must turn over a healthy percentage of their profits to subsidize the state's ailing horse-racing industry.) But the law passed by the Legislature and the constitutional amendment approved by voters imposes a five-year ban on new casinos downstate.

    Casinos efficiently shift consumer spending from lighter-taxed activities, such as shopping and dining out, to heavier-taxed ones, such as feeding slot machines and playing roulette. Their effect on local economies is less clear. The more money casinos bring in from outsiders, the better—which is an argument for plopping them close to New York City. The farther from the city they are, the more they will rely on locals gambling away cash that would otherwise be spent elsewhere in their communities. When local spending is diverted in this way, the net benefit can be zero after the initial construction boost wanes.

    That's why casinos are a Catch-22 for New York. The counties that most need economic stimulus are the ones that would benefit least from casinos, because they are far from downstate's population and tourism centers.

    Depressing? You bet.

    A version of this article appears in the November 17, 2014, print issue of Crain's New York Business.

    Share on twitterShare on facebookShare on google_plusone_shareShare on emailMore Sharing Services10

    PREVIOUS ARTICLEHaul of Fame

     

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    What a deal! $729 per night for a hotel roomHaul of FameDefine fair, Mr. Mayor

    About      Contact Us      Privacy      Terms and Conditions

    Entire contents © 2014 Crain Communications Inc.

    Full Web site

    When New York grants its first licenses for casinos beyond Indian lands, perhaps as soon as Nov. 21, it will essentially reveal the true motivation for bringing gambling to the Empire State. If it's to help upstate towns add quality jobs and get back on their feet, as Gov. Andrew Cuomo has said, the casinos will be sited in economically depressed areas, which are far from New York City and its well-off northern suburbs. If generating tax revenue is the goal, the gambling resorts will be put within easy reach of the city's big spenders and visitors.

    Therein lies a quandary for the state commission that will recommend three or four upstate casino locations before year's end. It would be naive to assume that the governor and legislators—who appointed the panel that chose the commission members—aren't at least a little interested in the taxes that casinos will generate. The new gambling venues will give the lawmakers an opportunity to reap billions of dollars without saying they raised taxes, even though much of the money will still be coming from their constituents' pockets.

    The place where gambling companies most want to build, of course, is the city itself. A Manhattan venue would shatter revenue records, as has been demonstrated by the eye-popping numbers from the "racino" at Aqueduct Racetrack in Queens. (Racinos are not allowed to have table games and must turn over a healthy percentage of their profits to subsidize the state's ailing horse-racing industry.) But the law passed by the Legislature and the constitutional amendment approved by voters imposes a five-year ban on new casinos downstate.

    Casinos efficiently shift consumer spending from lighter-taxed activities, such as shopping and dining out, to heavier-taxed ones, such as feeding slot machines and playing roulette. Their effect on local economies is less clear. The more money casinos bring in from outsiders, the better—which is an argument for plopping them close to New York City. The farther from the city they are, the more they will rely on locals gambling away cash that would otherwise be spent elsewhere in their communities. When local spending is diverted in this way, the net benefit can be zero after the initial construction boost wanes.

    That's why casinos are a Catch-22 for New York. The counties that most need economic stimulus are the ones that would benefit least from casinos, because they are far from downstate's population and tourism centers.

    Depressing? You bet.

    A version of this article appears in the November 17, 2014, print issue of Crain's New York Business.

    Share on twitterShare on facebookShare on google_plusone_shareShare on emailMore Sharing Services10

    PREVIOUS ARTICLEHaul of Fame

     

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    What a deal! $729 per night for a hotel roomHaul of FameDefine fair, Mr. Mayor

    About      Contact Us      Privacy      Terms and Conditions

    Entire contents © 2014 Crain Communications Inc.

    Full Web site

    When New York grants its first licenses for casinos beyond Indian lands, perhaps as soon as Nov. 21, it will essentially reveal the true motivation for bringing gambling to the Empire State. If it's to help upstate towns add quality jobs and get back on their feet, as Gov. Andrew Cuomo has said, the casinos will be sited in economically depressed areas, which are far from New York City and its well-off northern suburbs. If generating tax revenue is the goal, the gambling resorts will be put within easy reach of the city's big spenders and visitors.

    Therein lies a quandary for the state commission that will recommend three or four upstate casino locations before year's end. It would be naive to assume that the governor and legislators—who appointed the panel that chose the commission members—aren't at least a little interested in the taxes that casinos will generate. The new gambling venues will give the lawmakers an opportunity to reap billions of dollars without saying they raised taxes, even though much of the money will still be coming from their constituents' pockets.

    The place where gambling companies most want to build, of course, is the city itself. A Manhattan venue would shatter revenue records, as has been demonstrated by the eye-popping numbers from the "racino" at Aqueduct Racetrack in Queens. (Racinos are not allowed to have table games and must turn over a healthy percentage of their profits to subsidize the state's ailing horse-racing industry.) But the law passed by the Legislature and the constitutional amendment approved by voters imposes a five-year ban on new casinos downstate.

    Casinos efficiently shift consumer spending from lighter-taxed activities, such as shopping and dining out, to heavier-taxed ones, such as feeding slot machines and playing roulette. Their effect on local economies is less clear. The more money casinos bring in from outsiders, the better—which is an argument for plopping them close to New York City. The farther from the city they are, the more they will rely on locals gambling away cash that would otherwise be spent elsewhere in their communities. When local spending is diverted in this way, the net benefit can be zero after the initial construction boost wanes.

    That's why casinos are a Catch-22 for New York. The counties that most need economic stimulus are the ones that would benefit least from casinos, because they are far from downstate's population and tourism centers.

    Depressing? You bet.

    A version of this article appears in the November 17, 2014, print issue of Crain's New York Business.

    Share on twitterShare on facebookShare on google_plusone_shareShare on emailMore Sharing Services10

    PREVIOUS ARTICLEHaul of Fame

     

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    Savvy Flight Attendants Reveal Key In-Flight Tips(AARP)The Longest Flights in the World (Conde Nast Traveler)10 Things Flight Attendants Wish They Could Say (AARP)8 Honeymoon Destinations None of Your Friends Have Thought Of (Conde Nast Traveler)21 Vacation Resorts We Should All Visit Before We Die(Trips To Discover)

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    What a deal! $729 per night for a hotel roomHaul of FameDefine fair, Mr. Mayor

    About      Contact Us      Privacy      Terms and Conditions

    Entire contents © 2014 Crain Communications Inc.

    Full Web site

    When New York grants its first licenses for casinos beyond Indian lands, perhaps as soon as Nov. 21, it will essentially reveal the true motivation for bringing gambling to the Empire State. If it's to help upstate towns add quality jobs and get back on their feet, as Gov. Andrew Cuomo has said, the casinos will be sited in economically depressed areas, which are far from New York City and its well-off northern suburbs. If generating tax revenue is the goal, the gambling resorts will be put within easy reach of the city's big spenders and visitors.

    Therein lies a quandary for the state commission that will recommend three or four upstate casino locations before year's end. It would be naive to assume that the governor and legislators—who appointed the panel that chose the commission members—aren't at least a little interested in the taxes that casinos will generate. The new gambling venues will give the lawmakers an opportunity to reap billions of dollars without saying they raised taxes, even though much of the money will still be coming from their constituents' pockets.

    The place where gambling companies most want to build, of course, is the city itself. A Manhattan venue would shatter revenue records, as has been demonstrated by the eye-popping numbers from the "racino" at Aqueduct Racetrack in Queens. (Racinos are not allowed to have table games and must turn over a healthy percentage of their profits to subsidize the state's ailing horse-racing industry.) But the law passed by the Legislature and the constitutional amendment approved by voters imposes a five-year ban on new casinos downstate.

    Casinos efficiently shift consumer spending from lighter-taxed activities, such as shopping and dining out, to heavier-taxed ones, such as feeding slot machines and playing roulette. Their effect on local economies is less clear. The more money casinos bring in from outsiders, the better—which is an argument for plopping them close to New York City. The farther from the city they are, the more they will rely on locals gambling away cash that would otherwise be spent elsewhere in their communities. When local spending is diverted in this way, the net benefit can be zero after the initial construction boost wanes.

    That's why casinos are a Catch-22 for New York. The counties that most need economic stimulus are the ones that would benefit least from casinos, because they are far from downstate's population and tourism centers.

    Depressing? You bet.

    A version of this article appears in the November 17, 2014, print issue of Crain's New York Business.

    Share on twitterShare on facebookShare on google_plusone_shareShare on emailMore Sharing Services10

    PREVIOUS ARTICLEHaul of Fame

     

    From Around the Web

    Savvy Flight Attendants Reveal Key In-Flight Tips(AARP)The Longest Flights in the World (Conde Nast Traveler)10 Things Flight Attendants Wish They Could Say (AARP)8 Honeymoon Destinations None of Your Friends Have Thought Of (Conde Nast Traveler)21 Vacation Resorts We Should All Visit Before We Die(Trips To Discover)

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    Investors shopped stake in Astoria Cove project (Crain's New York Business)Industr

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