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H&R Block, Inc. Message Board

fastestgrowingever 14 posts  |  Last Activity: Jul 2, 2014 9:30 AM Member since: Jun 12, 2005
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  • Reply to

    Bill's Predictions

    by messina19822003 Jul 2, 2014 8:40 AM
    fastestgrowingever fastestgrowingever Jul 2, 2014 9:30 AM Flag

    That's why I say ignore him. He merely makes himself look bad with each post. Read back over the entire history of this discussion board. Really, it's pathetic. You have to wonder what it is in a person's makeup that prevents them from acknowledging personal mistakes and also prevents them from letting it go when they make them. Vindictiveness does not harm the person you hold the grudge against, it just destroys you. Most people understand this but alas, many do not.

    It's all here in the board's history if anyone cares to verify the validity of what I say?

  • Reply to

    Insiders Selling this Week - Wall St

    by bill_cassill Jun 29, 2014 10:15 PM
    fastestgrowingever fastestgrowingever Jul 1, 2014 7:56 PM Flag

    Just ignore him, not a single one of his issues, predictions, or concerns has ever amounted to anything at all. Meanwhile, TAX share price exceeds HRB for the first time as it hits another all time high. Looks like the company's investment in its own stock was pretty smart after all.

  • Reply to

    Who do you believe?

    by bill_cassill Jun 24, 2014 10:39 PM
    fastestgrowingever fastestgrowingever Jun 26, 2014 7:07 PM Flag

    Why do you say Liberty's business model is based on early filers and bank products? Sure, the offices located in low income areas are early season office but that is also true of Block offices located in low income areas. Those also tend to be office with higher return counts for Block, which is why Liberty franchisees tend to develop there first. Block can invest 5 years in growing an office in a middle class neighborhood to profitability. Franchisees don't want to wait that long. But these are dynamics of the market, not the business model itself. My own offices do 45% of their business after February 15. Some Liberty offices could easily close after 2/15 while others do more business in the late season. But it is only natural that a franchise organization would locate offices first where the low-hanging fruit grows. As far at bank products go, you might be interested to know that the last year all three national companies offered RAL products Liberty's percentage of customers who took them was lower than either Block's or Jackson-Hewitt's.

    Once again, your information is unreasonably biased without true understanding.

  • Reply to

    Who do you believe?

    by bill_cassill Jun 24, 2014 10:39 PM
    fastestgrowingever fastestgrowingever Jun 26, 2014 3:31 PM Flag

    Bill, you have certainly been consistent, predicting doom and gloom for JTH both before and after its earnings reports. You've been wrong, but consistently so ;-)

    The analysis of HRB is interesting. Are you aware that HRB has had about 20% of the paid tax prep market since at least the mid-1990's? For 20 years it has not grown its share of the overall market. Using the word "monopoly" for such a company is odd at best. The notion that HRB is cheaper than other companies is laughable. It has maintained revenue growth by continual price increases above the rate of inflation. That has actually been good for Liberty and others, but that cannot continue endlessly. Liberty has true growth potential while Block has demonstrated it has little, at least in the brick-and-mortar segment where the big money is. Given that you did not succeed as a Liberty franchisee, I guess I kinda sorta understand why you wouldn't own its stock, but it is baffling why you'd own HRB. In a year your investment has gone from about $27 to about $33. Had you invested in JTH a year ago you would have doubled your money.

    Maybe you should focus on another industry?

  • Reply to

    Where Is Billy?

    by messina19822003 Jun 18, 2014 9:06 AM
    fastestgrowingever fastestgrowingever Jun 20, 2014 4:09 PM Flag

    Bill, loans are minimally profitable. That is not where Liberty makes money, and hasn't been since regulators began attacking the product. You should understand what the financial products are that Liberty offers since you claim to be a former franchisee, but let me give you a review. First, all clients can choose to have their refund (or loan proceeds) deposited onto a debit card. That is one financial product. It is offered in all states. Second, clients who prefer to have Liberty's fees taken from their refund can choose either a loan product or a RAC/ERC product. The latter is the most profitable financial product Liberty has. They make far more from that product than they do from loans, and that product is offered in all states as well. ONLY loans were limited to less than all states. You expressed confusion as to how Liberty's profits from financial products increased. That is understandable if you understand little about Liberty's business, but I would think a former franchisee who offers analysis to others would understand their business better. What gives?

  • Reply to

    Where Is Billy?

    by messina19822003 Jun 18, 2014 9:06 AM
    fastestgrowingever fastestgrowingever Jun 19, 2014 10:04 AM Flag

    There was no reduction in states in which Liberty offered financial products. Do you even know what Liberty's financial products are? You claim you are a former failed franchisee, but even a failed franchisee would understand this, it seems to me. Instead, you seem to think that loan products are the only financial products. They are not, nor are they even the most profitable financial product.

  • fastestgrowingever by fastestgrowingever Jun 18, 2014 5:04 PM Flag

    Revenue growth outpaced the industry. The return on equity exceeded its ROE from the same quarter a year ago. That’s a strong sign of strength within the company. Compared to other companies in the overall market, Liberty’s return on equity significantly exceeds that of both the industry average and the S&P 500. Net income increased 142% from $1.7 million to $4 million. This growth for the quarter significantly outperformed against the S&P 500. Operating cash flow increased compared to previous year and exceeded the cash flow growth rate of the industry average. Earnings grew strongly at 133%. Stock price has surged by 72% over the past 12 months, outperforming the S&P 500.

    Bill Cassill, your predictions have not proven correct. Liberty did not postpone as you predicted. Its cash flow growth exceeds the industry average, an area where you express the gravest of concerns. You characterized HRB's fourth quarter numbers as "good". How do you characterize Liberty's results?

  • Reply to

    What Bill Does Know

    by bill_cassill Apr 27, 2014 10:00 PM
    fastestgrowingever fastestgrowingever Apr 30, 2014 6:36 PM Flag

    Okay, reversit62, let me ask you a question. You won't feel insulted if I ask you a question will you?

    What significance do you ascribe to point 7 that turkisprisons made fun of? Liberty certainly does not have the online presence of Intuit. And not even that of H&R Block. How do you believe that is hurting the company's performance? The percentage of the company's total returns file online relative to total returns overall is not too different than Block, and consistent with what we know of Jackson Hewitt. Can you enlighten us on what these numbers cited by your alterego mean?

  • Reply to

    What Bill Does Know

    by bill_cassill Apr 27, 2014 10:00 PM
    fastestgrowingever fastestgrowingever Apr 29, 2014 12:36 PM Flag

    Bill, I only insult you when you demonstrate that you're stupid ;-)

    Would you care to interpret any of these "facts"? For example, when Liberty sells a territory that cost it nothing on credit and then later writes off $40,000 as bad debt, how does that affect the company's balance sheet? Cash flow? Profitability? Growth?

    How do you interpret the company's use of its line of credit? What significance do you think it has? You spit out a lot of "facts" but you demonstrate time and again your inability to correctly analyze their significance. That's not an insult, it's a reasonable observation based on repeated performances.

  • Reply to

    Fast growing ever

    by bill_cassill Apr 28, 2014 11:38 AM
    fastestgrowingever fastestgrowingever Apr 29, 2014 12:32 PM Flag

    How many offices did HRB have after 16 years in business? How many returns were they doing? How many offices did JH have after 16 years in business? How many returns were they doing at that point in their development? So what exactly is your point?

  • Reply to

    Almost THE weekend!

    by doontoothers2000 Apr 11, 2014 10:40 AM
    fastestgrowingever fastestgrowingever Apr 27, 2014 1:43 PM Flag

    BTW, bill, Liberty never went on the road show to solicit institutional subscriptions to its IPO. Never got to that stage. More ignorance of the facts on your part, but it doesn't help when you just make s**t up...

  • Reply to

    Almost THE weekend!

    by doontoothers2000 Apr 11, 2014 10:40 AM
    fastestgrowingever fastestgrowingever Apr 27, 2014 1:41 PM Flag

    Bill believes that no company that doesn't pay a dividend can ever amount to anything.

  • Reply to

    Almost THE weekend!

    by doontoothers2000 Apr 11, 2014 10:40 AM
    fastestgrowingever fastestgrowingever Apr 27, 2014 1:39 PM Flag

    You reveal your ignorance with every post. You don't understand how Liberty can trade at $27 when it doesn't pay a dividend? Surely you are joking. Do you know how many years Microsoft went without ever paying a dividend? Google has a market value of $290 billion and has never paid a dividend. Ever heard of AIG? They've also never paid a dividend. The fact that it doesn't make sense to you is the reason why none of your analysis about Liberty makes any sense. The fact is that your assumptions are wrong, and you only look at the company actively trying to see negatives in everything. It shows, everyone can see it but you.

  • Reply to

    OFFICE MANAGERS

    by simpleman83313 Mar 28, 2014 11:23 AM
    fastestgrowingever fastestgrowingever Apr 21, 2014 7:32 PM Flag

    I agree a purely commission compensation model is a problem. Any time someone is doing work for the office that doesn't involve earning commission is something people will often come to resent. It's human nature. Commission compensation is best suited to incentivize people to sell. Most tax preparers don't see themselves as salespersons.

HRB
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