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Sprint Corporation Message Board

food_stamp_nation 237 posts  |  Last Activity: Sep 15, 2014 1:56 PM Member since: Mar 22, 2011
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  • food_stamp_nation by food_stamp_nation Sep 15, 2014 1:56 PM Flag

    Sad it does not bother you.

    The masturbating in the restroom wrong. You can joke about it all you want.

  • We could learn from them. So honest.

  • They are firing people saying they did bad work. Since they did a bunch at one
    time I think it is a scape goat since the tv show on all the problems with the plane.

  • food_stamp_nation by food_stamp_nation Sep 10, 2014 2:23 PM Flag

    scam

  • food_stamp_nation food_stamp_nation Sep 9, 2014 4:54 PM Flag

    Unless you visit the plant as a contractor like me or work there you have no idea what is going on. The net of the net is building the 787 costs are not going down or speeding up as
    planned so MGT is pushing everything ready or not. I guess the bottom was when I saw them installing the seats on the tar mat in the sun.

  • food_stamp_nation food_stamp_nation Sep 9, 2014 4:47 PM Flag

    I am so glad there is someone else out there who has been at Boeing. You summed it up as that is the motto for Boeing.

  • Reply to

    Sprint - What we know and don't know...

    by roadglide2459 Sep 8, 2014 6:38 PM
    food_stamp_nation food_stamp_nation Sep 9, 2014 1:55 PM Flag

    In response to question number 1. Sprint is said to have turned the corner so many times they have been around the block 10 times. Sprint has been losing money for 15 years and is in a price war that will taker it to zero. You are very stupid.

  • food_stamp_nation food_stamp_nation Sep 9, 2014 12:21 PM Flag

    The are many open transsexuals and gay folks. The MGT and skilled workers are all
    from California, Seattle or Texas. The locals do the unskilled labor from $18 to $20 dollars.
    I work for Sprint so I visit the plant often so I know. I have a bunch of government customers too and
    they are just like Boeing.

  • food_stamp_nation food_stamp_nation Sep 9, 2014 6:22 AM Flag

    The local news station are restricted due to Obama and the FAA are one.

  • food_stamp_nation by food_stamp_nation Sep 8, 2014 6:01 PM Flag

    They may get rid of it per some of the MGT on sight.

  • Time is money.

  • Reply to

    BA will hit 200$ after this bull market is done..

    by osulincat Sep 8, 2014 12:07 PM
    food_stamp_nation food_stamp_nation Sep 8, 2014 12:26 PM Flag

    not going to happen.

  • food_stamp_nation food_stamp_nation Sep 8, 2014 12:09 PM Flag

    The camera was at the Charleston plant but the recordings are from local and
    out of state employees.

  • food_stamp_nation food_stamp_nation Sep 8, 2014 10:31 AM Flag

    Al Jazeera has found that some Boeing workers have serious concerns about the safety of the 787 "Dreamliner" aircraft.

    In a new documentary, Broken Dreams: The Boeing 787, current and retired Boeing employees discuss their worries about quality control with Al Jazeera's Investigative Unit.

    Boeing's 787 "Dreamliner", which made its first commercial flight in late 2011, has been dogged with problems since plans for its launch were announced in 2003.

    Two battery failures in January 2013 sparked safety fears and led to fleets being temporarily grounded worldwide for over three months.

    Boeing says it does not compromise on product safety or quality.

    Whistleblower

    A worker at one of two Boeing 787 assembly lines in Charleston, in the US state of South Carolina, contacted Al Jazeera's Investigative Unit to share his worries about the "Dreamliner".

    The worker, speaking on condition of anonymity, says "with all the problems reported on the 787, there's 90 percent that's getting swept away".

    He describes the troubles with the plane as "an iceberg". He claims only 10 percent of problems are visible to the flying public, with the rest "hushed up".

    "I've seen a lot of things that should not go on at an airplane plant," the worker says. "It's been eating me alive to know what I know, and have no avenue, no venue to say anything."

    In a statement to Al Jazeera, Boeing says that "787 airplanes delivered from both South Carolina and Washington final assembly and delivery operations meet the highest safety and quality standards that are verified through robust test, verification and inspection processes".

    Ten of 15 'wouldn't fly'

    Using a concealed camera, the worker films inside the Boeing South Carolina plant, recording his discussions with colleagues.

    He randomly asks 15 of his co-workers who assemble the 787 "Dreamliner" if they would fly on the plane. Ten say they would not.

    "I wouldn't fly on one of these planes," one worker tells him, "because I see the quality of

  • food_stamp_nation food_stamp_nation Sep 8, 2014 10:05 AM Flag

    Where it seeks to break new ground is in the aforementioned secret recordings, and in a memo the producers say shows a decision to relax quality standards to meet the plane’s schedule.

    The North Charleston workers, their faces and real voices obscured, casually toss off some serious trash talk about the company, their fellow employees and the plane.

    It’s startling to hear. And Boeing will surely launch a scorched-earth investigation to nail down these commenters, as well as the employee who interviewed them

    787 gets harsh scrutiny on Al Jazeera

    Al Jazeera English takes a look at the 787’s troubled development, with some new twists. Also, three local retail giants rank high in opportunity for workers with a high-school education, and Chinese giant Huawei has a surprising answer to T-Mobile’s industrial espionage suit.

    Seattle Times business staff

    Reader Comments

    Read all 1 comments

    Post a comment
    .

    advertising

    Advertisement

    Boeing watchers may find that a documentary on the Dreamliner that debuts this week on Al Jazeera English, like the 787’s smoldering batteries in 2013, produces more heat than light.

    Like those powerful and problematic lithium ion batteries, however, the documentary does raise troubling questions and leave some matters unresolved.

    “Broken Dreams: The Boeing 787” is likely to attract a lot of eyeballs both here and in South Carolina, where workers at the North Charleston plant — recorded without their knowledge — express some disturbing opinions about the plane.

    Much of the story is familiar:

    • Boeing farming out production of major components across the globe.

    • The July 2007 rollout of the first plane with great pomp, though it turned out to be unfinished, followed by more than two years of delays.

    • The opening of a South Carolina final assembly plant after a bitter 2008 strike by Machinists here.

    • The back-to-back battery problems in January 2013 that grounded the entire fleet of 787s for six months before Boeing and the Federal Aviation Administration produced a fix, but not a full explanation.

    The elaborately produced 49-minute piece tells this story well, albeit with a clear critical agenda and a lack of technical specifics. If you’ve never seen a lithium ion battery get penetrated in slow motion by a bullet and burst into flames, this is your chance. It’s great TV, but viewers may wonder if it’s relevant — only the man who did that test suggests it is — given the very different chemistries and designs among various lithium batteries.

    Where it seeks to break new ground is in the aforementioned secret recordings, and in a memo the producers say shows a decision to relax quality standards to meet the plane’s schedule.

    The North Charleston workers, their faces and real voices obscured, casually toss off some serious trash talk about the company, their fellow employees and the plane.

    It’s startling to hear. And Boeing will surely launch a scorched-earth investigation to nail down these commenters, as well as the employee who interviewed them.

    And yet, when one of the South Carolina workers who complains about poor quality inspection is asked, “You think Everett is better?” his answer is a bit suspect: “I think Everett will do what’s right, to make the plane right. Because of the union, they have to. Here everyone is being pushed to meet this #$%$ schedule.”

    Experienced observers of the company will wonder whether this is one of the Everett workers dispatched to help get the Charleston plant on track. The question is legitimate, but it’s hard to evaluate the answer without knowing more about the source.

    The same is true for a memo the documentary cites as proof that quality is being sacrificed to meet production targets. The dramatic presentation is undermined by a lack of detail. (The Seattle Times reviewed that memo earlier this year and concluded it was not proof that safety was being compromised for production’s sake.)

    Unfortunately, Boeing doesn’t have much of a say. The company’s 787 chief, Larry Loftis, makes a brief interview appearance with the documentary makers before his PR manager stops the discussion, after the allegations of unnamed employees are brought up.

    Before he exits, Loftis declares he has “the highest degree of confidence” in the plane and Boeing’s production system.

    The documentary makers report the company later denounced their work as “in the worst tradition of tabloid-style television news.”

    Viewers can judge for themselves when the documentary debuts on the Al Jazeera cable channel Wednesday. In the U.S., where relatively few cable systems carry Al Jazeera, the piece initially will be available only online at Less

  • food_stamp_nation food_stamp_nation Sep 8, 2014 10:05 AM Flag

    All the employees hate Boeing to the core.

  • food_stamp_nation food_stamp_nation Sep 8, 2014 7:47 AM Flag

    You are right about that. Sprint has been dying the past 15 years and is still kicking. Sprint
    was always on life support.

  • food_stamp_nation by food_stamp_nation Sep 8, 2014 7:26 AM Flag

    Where it seeks to break new ground is in the aforementioned secret recordings, and in a memo the producers say shows a decision to relax quality standards to meet the plane’s schedule.

    The North Charleston workers, their faces and real voices obscured, casually toss off some serious trash talk about the company, their fellow employees and the plane.

    It’s startling to hear. And Boeing will surely launch a scorched-earth investigation to nail down these commenters, as well as the employee who interviewed them

    787 gets harsh scrutiny on Al Jazeera

    Al Jazeera English takes a look at the 787’s troubled development, with some new twists. Also, three local retail giants rank high in opportunity for workers with a high-school education, and Chinese giant Huawei has a surprising answer to T-Mobile’s industrial espionage suit.

    Seattle Times business staff



    Reader Comments

    Read all 1 comments

    Post a comment
    .

    advertising

    Advertisement


    Boeing watchers may find that a documentary on the Dreamliner that debuts this week on Al Jazeera English, like the 787’s smoldering batteries in 2013, produces more heat than light.

    Like those powerful and problematic lithium ion batteries, however, the documentary does raise troubling questions and leave some matters unresolved.

    “Broken Dreams: The Boeing 787” is likely to attract a lot of eyeballs both here and in South Carolina, where workers at the North Charleston plant — recorded without their knowledge — express some disturbing opinions about the plane.

    Much of the story is familiar:

    • Boeing farming out production of major components across the globe.

    • The July 2007 rollout of the first plane with great pomp, though it turned out to be unfinished, followed by more than two years of delays.

    • The opening of a South Carolina final assembly plant after a bitter 2008 strike by Machinists here.

    • The back-to-back battery problems in January 2013 that grounded the entire fleet of 787s for six months before Boeing and the Federal Aviation Administration produced a fix, but not a full explanation.

    The elaborately produced 49-minute piece tells this story well, albeit with a clear critical agenda and a lack of technical specifics. If you’ve never seen a lithium ion battery get penetrated in slow motion by a bullet and burst into flames, this is your chance. It’s great TV, but viewers may wonder if it’s relevant — only the man who did that test suggests it is — given the very different chemistries and designs among various lithium batteries.

    Where it seeks to break new ground is in the aforementioned secret recordings, and in a memo the producers say shows a decision to relax quality standards to meet the plane’s schedule.

    The North Charleston workers, their faces and real voices obscured, casually toss off some serious trash talk about the company, their fellow employees and the plane.

    It’s startling to hear. And Boeing will surely launch a scorched-earth investigation to nail down these commenters, as well as the employee who interviewed them.

    And yet, when one of the South Carolina workers who complains about poor quality inspection is asked, “You think Everett is better?” his answer is a bit suspect: “I think Everett will do what’s right, to make the plane right. Because of the union, they have to. Here everyone is being pushed to meet this #$%$ schedule.”

    Experienced observers of the company will wonder whether this is one of the Everett workers dispatched to help get the Charleston plant on track. The question is legitimate, but it’s hard to evaluate the answer without knowing more about the source.

    The same is true for a memo the documentary cites as proof that quality is being sacrificed to meet production targets. The dramatic presentation is undermined by a lack of detail. (The Seattle Times reviewed that memo earlier this year and concluded it was not proof that safety was being compromised for production’s sake.)

    Unfortunately, Boeing doesn’t have much of a say. The company’s 787 chief, Larry Loftis, makes a brief interview appearance with the documentary makers before his PR manager stops the discussion, after the allegations of unnamed employees are brought up.

    Before he exits, Loftis declares he has “the highest degree of confidence” in the plane and Boeing’s production system.

    The documentary makers report the company later denounced their work as “in the worst tradition of tabloid-style television news.”

    Viewers can judge for themselves when the documentary debuts on the Al Jazeera cable channel Wednesday. In the U.S., where relatively few cable systems carry Al Jazeera, the piece initially will be available only online at

  • Reply to

    Sprint is healthcare.gov with dial tone

    by food_stamp_nation Sep 7, 2014 8:35 AM
    food_stamp_nation food_stamp_nation Sep 7, 2014 11:01 AM Flag

    You can ride it to zero.

  • food_stamp_nation by food_stamp_nation Sep 7, 2014 8:35 AM Flag

    Both will be gone.

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