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garysnoop1 220 posts  |  Last Activity: 6 hours ago Member since: Oct 16, 2003
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  • Reply to

    Snip from VGXI site, interesting.

    by mturacy Jun 22, 2015 11:24 PM
    garysnoop1 garysnoop1 Jun 23, 2015 8:46 AM Flag

    Making a somewhat simple explanation of a very complex subject well done.

  • Reply to

    Punch in dMAb Technology and you see this..

    by garysnoop1 Jun 21, 2015 4:55 PM
    garysnoop1 garysnoop1 Jun 21, 2015 4:58 PM Flag

    Funny...I never once saw 35 years of mice studies mentioned.

  • Inovio's dMAb Technology: A Medical Revolution Worth Investing In
    Jun. 17, 2015 3:10 AM ET | 57 comments | About: Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (INO)
    Disclosure: The author is long INO, AMGN, REGN. (More...)
    Summary
    Inovio has DNA vaccines in clinical trials.
    Monoclonal Antibodies or mAbs are currently a $50 billion business.
    dMAb extends DNA vaccine technology to enable patients to produce their own mAbs.
    Inovio (NASDAQ:INO) has established itself as the leader in the field of DNA-based vaccines. A set of vaccines for cancers and infectious diseases are currently in clinical trials. For an overview of Inovio's non-dMAb pipeline, you can check my 2014 article, Is Inovio Undervalued After Positive HPV Therapy Results?

    In addition, Inovio has developed an extension of this technology, dMAb (pronounced dee-mabb), for DNA Monoclonal Antibodies, that will allow patients to produce monoclonal antibodies within their own bodies. This is likely to become a major revolution for patients, the biotechnology industry, and investors.

    Many of the most beneficial and highest-income-producing therapies right now are monoclonal antibodies. Many more are in company pipelines. These versatile molecules can harness the body's immune system to fight invaders, cancer cells, or other molecules that are causing problems. Thus, specific dMAbs could prevent, cure, or alleviate a wide variety of diseases.

    To understand what will happen in the next few years, we need to understand the science. Inovio's CEO Dr. Joseph Kim was kind enough to answer my questions about dMAb technology in an interview on Friday, June 12, 2015. We also talked about Inovio's intellectual property protection for DNA vaccines and dMAbs. Following that section, I will turn to the value of dMAb for investors.

    If you already understand monoclonal antibodies and how Inovio's DNA vaccines work, you can skip ahead to the dMAb science section.

    DNA Vaccines
    Traditional vaccines induce an immune response in the body by introducing an antigen, which is a protein that causes the body to produce antibodies and other forms of immune responses. The original smallpox vaccine was made from a weaker relative, cowpox, and most early vaccines were made from either killed disease organisms or weakened (attenuated) live organisms. In the late 20th century, the more common practice became identifying antigens that could, by themselves, generate a protective immune response to the target organisms.

    Inovio has moved the process to a deeper level. Given the structure of a desired antigen, a DNA strand can be made that corresponds to it. This DNA is manufactured and incorporated into a plasmid with other components including a promoter and a backbone. A solution of plasmids in water is the DNA vaccine. In practice, electroporation is used to get the plasmids into a patient's muscle cells. Other tissues would work, but according to Dr. Kim "muscle is chosen because it is a nice, large chunk of material that can serve as the production area for our antigens." In a cell, a plasmid is carried to the nucleus and the DNA is presented to the cell's apparatus for manufacturing proteins. Note the DNA does not become part of the chromosomes. The cell starts manufacturing the protein molecules, which then migrates to the surface of the cell where it presents as an antigen.

    The antigen is recognized by the immune system, particularly T-cells, as foreign, provoking an immune response. This can result in protection against disease, as was shown in Inovio's Phase 2 trial of VGX-3100 for HPV (human papillomavirus) and resulting cervical dysplasia.

    mAb science
    The natural human immune response to disease organisms typically produces a variety of antibodies. Monoclonal indicates all the antibodies are identical. Antibodies are complex proteins (actually glycoproteins) with the ability to bind to specific parts (epitopes) of antigens. They mark a virus or cell for destruction by other components of the immune system.

    Monoclonal antibodies are made artificially by a process that was developed starting in the 1970s and is now well understood. MAbs are typically generated in mouse cell cultures. Nevertheless, the process of discovering a suitable antibody for a disease target and then producing pure quantities of it sufficient for medical use is an expensive one.

    Monoclonal antibodies are very versatile. They can be used to target the body's own proteins, for instance tumor necrosis factor alpha, which is involved in inflammation. Janssen Biotech's Remicade (infliximab) and AbbVie's (NYSE:ABBV) Humira (adalimumab) are examples of mAb therapies with this target, but the big mover in the space has been Genentech, now part of Roche (OTCQX:RHHBY).

    Dr. Kim pointed out, "There are some difficulties. There are many proteins or targets they cannot make monoclonal antibodies against." mAbs cannot be given in pill form. They are typically injected every two weeks. They are also typically expensive, not just because they are relatively new wonder drugs, but because they are expensive to produce. As biosimilars become available, they may reduce costs, but nothing like the cost reduction seen when a generic small molecule replaces a branded small molecule. So Kim believes "there is room to address new targets and to bring out new products against targets that are well-validated, with new commercial and patent potential associated with that."

    dMAb science
    DNA monoclonal antibodies produce mAbs in the patients' own cells. At least in theory, any monoclonal antibody that can be produced can be made from a dMAb.

    Figure 1 shows the steps in the process. It should be noted that a considerable degree of patented technology goes into the production of the plasmids that can accomplish this feat.

    The first step in creating a working dMAb is getting a working mAb. Given that, a computer-generated DNA string is designed that will invoke mAb production by human cells. The DNA is made and incorporated into a plasmid which contains other components (promoters) that make the process work. The plasmids are suspended in water and injected into the patient's muscle tissue. Then electroporation is used to allow the plasmids to pass through the cell walls. They make their way towards the nucleus. There the target DNA string uses the cell apparatus for antibody creation. The antibodies, which are identical or monoclonal, migrate to the cell wall and are then released to the bloodstream, where they can circulate like other antibodies.

    As long as the inoculated muscle cells produce the mAbs, there should be no need for repeat inoculations. dMAb appears to have other advantages over conventional mAbs. dMAbs are easier to manufacture and are less fragile and less heat sensitive. They might work with one administration, or for much longer intervals than mAbs. They could be less toxic because they generate mAbs at a steady rate, rather than subjecting patients to a high dose that trails off over two weeks before a new dose is given.

    Another dMAb advantage is that the resulting antibodies are fully humanized, as opposed to some of the mouse-made mAbs produced under the present system.

    mAb economics and potential Value of dMAb technology
    Dr. Kim stated he believes that dMAbs will be able to reproduce any current monoclonal antibody and in addition may be able to address targets that are difficult to address using current mAb technology. Inovio will be pursuing both known mAbs and novel mAbs as its program progresses.

    One way to see the value of the technology is by looking at revenues from current mAb therapies. An Inovio press release on dMAb states that "In 2012, global sales value of monoclonal antibodies exceeded $50 billion. Among the top 10 best-selling drugs in 2012, six of them were monoclonal antibodies, each with annual sales exceeding $5 billion."

    Table 1 shows select global mAb revenues for 2014:

    mAb Company 2014 revenue
    Humira (adalimumab) AbbVie $12.54 billion
    Remicade (infliximab) Janssen/J&J $6.87 billion
    Rituxan (rituximab) Biogen/Roche $6.9 billion
    Erbitux (cetuximab) Bristol-Myers $0.72 billion
    Avastin (bevacizumab) Roche/Genentech $6.42 billion
    Herceptin (trastuzumab) Roche/Genentech $6.27 billion
    Lucentis (ranibizumab) Roche/Genentech $1.7 billion
    Amgen's (NASDAQ:AMGN) Repatha and Regeneron's (NASDAQ:REGN) Praluent are both monoclonal antibodies that inhibit PCSK9 and, therefore, reduce bad cholesterol. Both are expected to be approved by the FDA this year and to eventually generate multi-billion dollar annual revenues.

    Partnering with Inovio to produce dMAb therapies would appear to give pharmaceutical companies a way to extend the lifetimes of their current mAb therapies against the threat of biosimilar competition, in addition to making bi-weekly injections unnecessary.

    Partnering will be important to Inovio given that it has many pipeline opportunities and the high cost of conducting clinical trials. Inovio's income has come mostly from grants and collaboration. It was $5.2 million in Q1 and its cash balance was $81 million at the end of Q1. Another $82 million was raised in May.

    Preclinical Trials and Ebola project
    Inovio has already demonstrated dMAb in preclinical animal trials. In a paper published in Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics in 2013, Optimized and enhanced DNA plasmid vector … , Inovio described the successful production of an anti-HIV mAb in mice.

    Inovio used the same dMAb technology targeting Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) to completely protect 100% of treated mice from a lethal CHIKV injection in preclinical studies (Chikungunya dMAb press release) in 2014.

    Using a $45 million grant from DARPA, Inovio and partners are now undertaking proof of concept in humans for protection against the Ebola virus. The team (which includes MedImmune (part of AstraZeneca (NYSE:AZN)), GeneOne Life Sciences and three universities) will produce and test not one but three experimental Ebola vaccines. Inovio is the lead organization for the grant.

    Inovio has long had a DNA-based Ebola vaccine that protected 100% of vaccinated animals from death when exposed to the virus. This vaccine, INO-4212, has just begun its Phase 1 study in human patients. Data from the Phase 1 study should be available by Q4 2015.

    Med

    William Meyers, OpenIcon (180 clicks)
    Long only, tech, biotech, research analyst
    Profile| Send Message| Follow (704 followers) | Performance
    Inovio's dMAb Technology: A Medical Revolution Worth Investing In
    Jun. 17, 2015 3:10 AM ET | 57 comments | About: Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (INO)
    Disclosure: The author is long INO, AMGN, REGN. (More...)
    Summary
    Inovio has DNA vaccines in clinical trials.
    Monoclonal Antibodies or mAbs are currently a $50 billion business.
    dMAb extends DNA vaccine technology to enable patients to produce their own mAbs.
    Inovio (NASDAQ:INO) has established itself as the leader in the field of DNA-based vaccines. A set of vaccines for cancers and infectious diseases are currently in clinical trials. For an overview of Inovio's non-dMAb pipeline, you can check my 2014 article, Is Inovio Undervalued After Positive HPV Therapy Results?

    In addition, Inovio has developed an extension of this technology, dMAb (pronounced dee-mabb), for DNA Monoclonal Antibodies, that will allow patients to produce monoclonal antibodies within their own bodies. This is likely to become a major revolution for patients, the biotechnology industry, and investors.

    Many of the most beneficial and highest-income-producing therapies right now are monoclonal antibodies. Many more are in company pipelines. These versatile molecules can harness the body's immune system to fight invaders, cancer cells, or other molecules that are causing problems. Thus, specific dMAbs could prevent, cure, or alleviate a wide variety of diseases.

    To understand what will happen in the next few years, we need to understand the science. Inovio's CEO Dr. Joseph Kim was kind enough to answer my questions about dMAb technology in an interview on Friday, June 12, 2015. We also talked about Inovio's intellectual property protection for DNA vaccines and dMAbs. Following that section, I will turn to the value of dMAb for investors.

    If you already understand monoclonal antibodies and how Inovio's DNA vaccines work, you can skip ahead to the dMAb science section.

    DNA Vaccines
    Traditional vaccines induce an immune response in the body by introducing an antigen, which is a protein that causes the body to produce antibodies and other forms of immune responses. The original smallpox vaccine was made from a weaker relative, cowpox, and most early vaccines were made from either killed disease organisms or weakened (attenuated) live organisms. In the late 20th century, the more common practice became identifying antigens that could, by themselves, generate a protective immune response to the target organisms.

    Inovio has moved the process to a deeper level. Given the structure of a desired antigen, a DNA strand can be made that corresponds to it. This DNA is manufactured and incorporated into a plasmid with other components including a promoter and a backbone. A solution of plasmids in water is the DNA vaccine. In practice, electroporation is used to get the plasmids into a patient's muscle cells. Other tissues would work, but according to Dr. Kim "muscle is chosen because it is a nice, large chunk of material that can serve as the production area for our antigens." In a cell, a plasmid is carried to the nucleus and the DNA is presented to the cell's apparatus for manufacturing proteins. Note the DNA does not become part of the chromosomes. The cell starts manufacturing the protein molecules, which then migrates to the surface of the cell where it presents as an antigen.

    The antigen is recognized by the immune system, particularly T-cells, as foreign, provoking an immune response. This can result in protection against disease, as was shown in Inovio's Phase 2 trial of VGX-3100 for HPV (human papillomavirus) and resulting cervical dysplasia.

    mAb science
    The natural human immune response to disease organisms typically produces a variety of antibodies. Monoclonal indicates all the antibodies are identical. Antibodies are complex proteins (actually glycoproteins) with the ability to bind to specific parts (epitopes) of antigens. They mark a virus or cell for destruction by other components of the immune system.

    Monoclonal antibodies are made artificially by a process that was developed starting in the 1970s and is now well understood. MAbs are typically generated in mouse cell cultures. Nevertheless, the process of discovering a suitable antibody for a disease target and then producing pure quantities of it sufficient for medical use is an expensive one.

    Monoclonal antibodies are very versatile. They can be used to target the body's own proteins, for instance tumor necrosis factor alpha, which is involved in inflammation. Janssen Biotech's Remicade (infliximab) and AbbVie's (NYSE:ABBV) Humira (adalimumab) are examples of mAb therapies with this target, but the big mover in the space has been Genentech, now part of Roche (OTCQX:RHHBY).

    Dr. Kim pointed out, "There are some difficulties. There are many proteins or targets they cannot make monoclonal antibodies against." mAbs cannot be given in pill form. They are typically injected every two weeks. They are also typically expensive, not just because they are relatively new wonder drugs, but because they are expensive to produce. As biosimilars become available, they may reduce costs, but nothing like the cost reduction seen when a generic small molecule replaces a branded small molecule. So Kim believes "there is room to address new targets and to bring out new products against targets that are well-validated, with new commercial and patent potential associated with that."

    dMAb science
    DNA monoclonal antibodies produce mAbs in the patients' own cells. At least in theory, any monoclonal antibody that can be produced can be made from a dMAb.

    Figure 1 shows the steps in the process. It should be noted that a considerable degree of patented technology goes into the production of the plasmids that can accomplish this feat.

    The first step in creating a working dMAb is getting a working mAb. Given that, a computer-generated DNA string is designed that will invoke mAb production by human cells. The DNA is made and incorporated into a plasmid which contains other components (promoters) that make the process work. The plasmids are suspended in water and injected into the patient's muscle tissue. Then electroporation is used to allow the plasmids to pass through the cell walls. They make their way towards the nucleus. There the target DNA string uses the cell apparatus for antibody creation. The antibodies, which are identical or monoclonal, migrate to the cell wall and are then released to the bloodstream, where they can circulate like other antibodies.

    As long as the inoculated muscle cells produce the mAbs, there should be no need for repeat inoculations. dMAb appears to have other advantages over conventional mAbs. dMAbs are easier to manufacture and are less fragile and less heat sensitive. They might work with one administration, or for much longer intervals than mAbs. They could be less toxic because they generate mAbs at a steady rate, rather than subjecting patients to a high dose that trails off over two weeks before a new dose is given.

    Another dMAb advantage is that the resulting antibodies are fully humanized, as opposed to some of the mouse-made mAbs produced under the present system.

    mAb economics and potential Value of dMAb technology
    Dr. Kim stated he believes that dMAbs will be able to reproduce any current monoclonal antibody and in addition may be able to address targets that are difficult to address using current mAb technology. Inovio will be pursuing both known mAbs and novel mAbs as its program progresses.

    One way to see the value of the technology is by looking at revenues from current mAb therapies. An Inovio press release on dMAb states that "In 2012, global sales value of monoclonal antibodies exceeded $50 billion. Among the top 10 best-selling drugs in 2012, six of them were monoclonal antibodies, each with annual sales exceeding $5 billion."

    Table 1 shows select global mAb revenues for 2014:

    mAb Company 2014 revenue
    Humira (adalimumab) AbbVie $12.54 billion
    Remicade (infliximab) Janssen/J&J $6.87 billion
    Rituxan (rituximab) Biogen/Roche $6.9 billion
    Erbitux (cetuximab) Bristol-Myers $0.72 billion
    Avastin (bevacizumab) Roche/Genentech $6.42 billion
    Herceptin (trastuzumab) Roche/Genentech $6.27 billion
    Lucentis (ranibizumab) Roche/Genentech $1.7 billion
    Amgen's (NASDAQ:AMGN) Repatha and Regeneron's (NASDAQ:REGN) Praluent are both monoclonal antibodies that inhibit PCSK9 and, therefore, reduce bad cholesterol. Both are expected to be approved by the FDA this year and to eventually generate multi-billion dollar annual revenues.

    Partnering with Inovio to produce dMAb therapies would appear to give pharmaceutical companies a way to extend the lifetimes of their current mAb therapies against the threat of biosimilar competition, in addition to making bi-weekly injections unnecessary.

    Partnering will be important to Inovio given that it has many pipeline opportunities and the high cost of conducting clinical trials. Inovio's income has come mostly from grants and collaboration. It was $5.2 million in Q1 and its cash balance was $81 million at the end of Q1. Another $82 million was raised in May.

    Preclinical Trials and Ebola project
    Inovio has already demonstrated dMAb in preclinical animal trials. In a paper published in Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics in 2013, Optimized and enhanced DNA plasmid vector … , Inovio described the successful production of an anti-HIV mAb in mice.

    Inovio used the same dMAb technology targeting Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) to completely protect 100% of treated mice from a lethal CHIKV injection in preclinical studies (Chikungunya dMAb press release) in 2014.

    Using a $45 million grant from DARPA, Inovio and partners are now undertaking proof of concept in humans for protection against the Ebola virus. The team (which includes MedImmune (part of AstraZeneca (NYSE:AZN)), GeneOne Life Sciences and three universities) will produce and test not one but three experimental Ebola vaccines. Inovio is the lead organization for the grant.

    Inovio has long had a DNA-based Ebola vaccine that protected 100% of vaccinated animals from death when exposed to the virus. This vaccine, INO-4212, has just begun its Phase 1 study in human patients. Data from the Phase 1 study should be available by Q4 2015.

    Med

  • garysnoop1 garysnoop1 Jun 21, 2015 10:23 AM Flag

    Seems the window of discount buying may be closing soon .Don't take it for granted.
    Long-Term Sentiment Disclosure:
    What do you think.

  • Funding Will Accelerate Development of Inovio's DNA-Based Monoclonal Antibodies That Could Offer Product Development, Manufacturing, Scale-Up and Dosing Benefits

    PLYMOUTH MEETING, Pa., April 8, 2015 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Nasdaq:INO) announced today that the company has been selected to receive a grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to lead a collaborative team to develop multiple treatment and prevention approaches against Ebola. Inovio is the prime contractor on the DARPA program. Other collaborators are: MedImmune, the global biologics research and development arm of AstraZeneca; GeneOne Life Sciences (KSE:011000) and its manufacturing subsidiary, VGXI, Inc.; and Professor David B. Weiner , PhD, professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Emory University and Vanderbilt University.

    The Inovio-led consortium is taking a multi-faceted approach to develop products to prevent and treat Ebola infection. These programs include development and early clinical testing of:
    • A therapeutic DNA-based monoclonal antibody product dMAb™ against the Ebola virus infection. This promising new technology has properties that best fit a response to the outbreak in that they could be designed and manufactured expediently on a large scale using common fermentation technology, are thermal-stable, and may provide more rapid therapeutic benefit.
    • A highly potent conventional protein-based therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb) product against Ebola virus infection.
    • Inovio's DNA-based vaccine against Ebola, with the first patient expected to be dosed in 2Q 2015. In previously published preclinical testing, Inovio's DNA-based Ebola vaccine protected 100% of vaccinated animals from death and sickness after being exposed to a lethal dose of the Ebola virus.

    Pathogen specific mAbs have emerged as a viable approach for immunoprophylaxis against Ebola and other pathogens where anti-viral drugs or vaccinations are not currently available. mAbs can be administered either just before or just after exposure to the pathogen and serve to combat the immediate effects of the pathogen. Unlike vaccines, immunoprophylaxis by mAbs does not develop long term immune memory. Therefore an ideal approach would include the administration of a mAb for immediate protection and a vaccine to train the immune system for longer term protection.

    Previous Ebola research studies have shown that monoclonal antibodies (such as ZMapp) could be useful in treating patients who have been infected with Ebola virus by selectively binding and neutralizing the virus in the body. Inovio is already developing dMAb products against influenza and antibiotic resistant bacteria as a subcontractor under a separate DARPA funded grant.

    The proposed effort will cover pre-clinical development costs for the dMAb products and protein mAb candidates as well as GMP manufacturing costs and the phase I clinical study costs with the three product candidates. MedImmune will manufacture the protein mAbs and the Inovio-GeneOne/VGXI team will manufacture the DNA based products. The academic partners are leading Ebola research and medical centers at the front edge of the discovery efforts for highly potent anti-Ebola mAbs. The funding period is over two years and covers a base award of $21 million and an option award of $24 million. The development proposal includes a second option of $11 million to support additional product supply and clinical development activities. The options are contingent upon the successful completion of certain pre-clinical development milestones.

    Due to the global concerns and immediacy of need, the consortium has employed an aggressive development timeline for the Ebola products by developing these three options in parallel, resulting in an acceleration of the initial clinical evaluation. None of these products will contain any Ebola virus or viral particles.

    Dr. J. Joseph Kim , President & CEO of Inovio, said, "We thank DARPA for their confidence in Inovio to address this medical crisis by simultaneously developing a preventive Ebola vaccine and treatment for those infected. We are advancing against this virus on all fronts. The development of the novel DNA-based monoclonal antibodies hold the greatest potential benefit in their speed of manufacturing, dosing and stability, and we are pleased to add them to our strong product pipeline."

    Dr. Niranjan Y. Sardesai , COO of Inovio and the DARPA Ebola Program Team Leader, said, "This is an exciting government–academia–industry partnership bringing together global product development experts to rapidly develop and test novel dMAb products against Ebola. Our optimized DNA based product programs are uniquely placed to target both rapid immunity through delivery of dMAb products as well as long-term immunity via DNA vaccination. Success in any one of the three parallel approaches by the team will be a boost to the global efforts against the Ebola virus."

    DARPA, an agency of the U.S. Department of Defense that creates and supports novel technologies important for national security, has selected Inovio to develop products that if successful can add to the arsenal of rapid response capabilities. Inovio's Ebola program is initially targeted to treat first responders and Ebola-infected health care workers and patients, but could potentially be widely utilized to stem the spread of the current or subsequent outbreaks.

    Inovio and the other participating institutions have a strong history of previous collaborative development efforts having worked together on multi-institutional product development grants and contracts bringing new products to the clinic. Inovio's previous collaborative Ebola vaccine research efforts with GeneOne Life Sciences have been incorporated into this Inovio-led team.

  • garysnoop1 garysnoop1 Jun 20, 2015 7:13 PM Flag

    Your wish should,,very soon be their command...And that's a fact.. jack !!

  • garysnoop1 garysnoop1 Jun 20, 2015 7:12 PM Flag

    Yes and no,,I'm in but don't spend much time there. I try to stay here and keep the monsters from over running it here.I try to present facts thru the BS..

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • garysnoop1 garysnoop1 Jun 20, 2015 2:56 PM Flag

    Volume is the tell and with a substantial spike to the up side, it cuts thru the smoke and mirrors of the "bad people". My money says theirs going to be a hell of a week ahead.. stay tuned,good luck to all..I believe the short ones ( IQ 73 and down) will need it.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • INOVIO experienced unusually high volume on Jun. 19, as the stock gained 2.18% to a closing price of $8.92. The stock saw 2.02 million shares trade hands over the course of the day on 5,038 trades. Given that the stock’s average daily volume over the last month has been 1.26 million shares a day, this represents a pretty substantial spike over the norm.

    Inovio Pharmaceuticals Inc. has a P/B ratio of 6.19. The stock has traded between $14.20 and $6.33 over the last 52-weeks, its 50-day SMA is now $8.94, and its 200-day SMA $9.22.

    Headquartered in , , Inovio Pharmaceuticals Inc. has n/a employees and is currently under the leadership of CEO .
    - THE IMPORTANCE OF THE RUSSELL 3000

    The Russell 3000 is not well known outside the world of finance, but it’s one of the strongest indices out there for getting a broad sense of the stock market. Unlike the better-known Dow Jones Industrial Average or S&P 500, membership on the Russell 3000 isn’t selected by committee. It’s simply the 3,000 most valuable companies in the country.

    With 3,000 stocks making up the index, it gives a broad look at the markets, including the small-and mid-cap companies that aren’t on the Dow or the S&P 500. And with a rules-based system for determining membership, there’s no bias that could potentially limit membership. That’s why many financial professionals will turn to the Russell 3000 long before the better-known indices when trying to take the temperature of the market.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • garysnoop1 garysnoop1 Jun 19, 2015 3:43 PM Flag

    Our time is commin"

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Reply to

    Short-term Price Target $21

    by optimistyic321 Jun 19, 2015 8:35 AM
    garysnoop1 garysnoop1 Jun 19, 2015 1:46 PM Flag

    Before I die !!

  • Reply to

    Seems the better the news, the lower we go..

    by garysnoop1 Jun 19, 2015 10:47 AM
    garysnoop1 garysnoop1 Jun 19, 2015 12:47 PM Flag

    I hear the clock off in the distance. as you do.I think things should be solidifying soon, the co.is quiet,it's not like them so lets hope theirs something up their sleeve besides their arm..One good bit of good news will trigger a host of news..The suspense of an inevitable release is killin' me..so...we wait..Make big bucks...

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Reply to

    Seems the better the news, the lower we go..

    by garysnoop1 Jun 19, 2015 10:47 AM
    garysnoop1 garysnoop1 Jun 19, 2015 12:36 PM Flag

    The good news is...their is no bad news..and the lower we go!..Thiers; nothing else to talk about here so we may as well entertain ourselves..But I can wait..

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Just gota' ride it out.

  • garysnoop1 garysnoop1 Jun 16, 2015 4:07 PM Flag

    Show us the money !!!

  • Reply to

    watch this..

    by garysnoop1 Jun 16, 2015 8:25 AM
    garysnoop1 garysnoop1 Jun 16, 2015 8:43 AM Flag

    Bern67..Enter on YouTube site.. "conference inovio news video" good luck.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Reply to

    watch this..

    by garysnoop1 Jun 16, 2015 8:25 AM
    garysnoop1 garysnoop1 Jun 16, 2015 8:39 AM Flag

    I'll try to load it agn.

  • Put this into YouTube search engine "conference inovio news video" you will know why you are here.

  • garysnoop1 by garysnoop1 Jun 16, 2015 8:25 AM Flag

    https://search.yahoo.com/search;_ylt=A0LEV2HxFIBVnRwA1r1XNyoA;_ylc=X1MDMjc2NjY3OQRfcgMyBGZyA3lmcC10LTMyMgRncHJpZANYUjd0TW1FdVNIeTkuYlIzb1pNQ0hBBG5fcnNsdAMwBG5fc3VnZwM0BG9yaWdpbgNzZWFyY2gueWFob28uY29tBHBvcwMzBHBxc3RyA2plZmZlcmllcyBjb25mZXJlbmNlIGlub3ZpbyBuZXdzIHZpBHBxc3RybAMzNQRxc3RybAMzOARxdWVyeQNqZWZmZXJpZXMgY29uZmVyZW5jZSBpbm92aW8gbmV3cyB2aWRlbwR0X3N0bXADMTQzNDQ1NzM0NQ--?p=jefferies+conference+inovio+news+video&fr2=sa-gp-search&fr=yfp-t-322&fp=1

  • Reply to

    The manipulators' are at it again..

    by garysnoop1 Jun 15, 2015 10:02 AM
    garysnoop1 garysnoop1 Jun 15, 2015 12:19 PM Flag

    Now that they did that,they are now buying..and it goes on..

CCCR
0.6899-0.0462(-6.28%)Sep 1 2:32 PMEDT