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BCE Inc. Message Board

gbor 12 posts  |  Last Activity: 27 minutes ago Member since: Dec 19, 2008
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  • gbor gbor May 15, 2015 2:14 PM Flag

    NOT AT ALL. That's all you need to know.

    Sentiment: Strong Sell

  • Time will tell... see you in november, best short this year.

    Sentiment: Strong Sell

  • Less than $1

    Sentiment: Strong Sell

  • Very bad news...no buyers!

    Sentiment: Strong Sell

  • Reply to

    About delisting

    by gekko1987 May 19, 2015 12:04 AM
    gbor gbor May 19, 2015 5:05 PM Flag

    They won't have to move, but instead kick out head first period don't worry.

    Sentiment: Strong Sell

  • Gas consumption growth in 2015 is largely driven by demand in the industrial and electric power sectors. EIA projects natural gas consumption in the power sector to grow by 13.7% in 2015

    Sentiment: Strong Sell

  • How Does It Affect You?
    As a shareholder, you should seriously revisit your investment decision in a company that has become delisted; in many cases, it may be better to cut your losses. A firm unable to meet the listing requirements of the exchange upon which it is traded is quite obviously not in a great position. Each case of delisting needs to be looked at on an individual basis. However, being kicked out of an exclusive club such as the NYSE or the Nasdaq is about as disgraceful for a company as it is prestigious for it to be listed in the first place.

    Even if a company continues to operate successfully after being delisted, the main problem with getting booted from the exclusive club is the trust factor. People lose their faith in the stock. When a stock trades on the NYSE or Nasdaq, it has an aura of reliability and accuracy in reporting financial statements. When a company's stock is demoted to the OTCBB or pink sheets, it loses its reputation. Pink sheet and OTCBB stocks lack the stringent regulation requirements that investors come to expect from NYSE and Nasdaq-traded stocks. Investors are willing to pay a premium for shares of trustworthy companies and are (understandably) leery of firms with shady reputations.

    Another problem for delisted stocks is that many institutional investors are restricted from researching and buying them. Investors who already own a stock prior to the delisting may be forced by their investment mandates to liquidate their positions, further depressing the company's share price by increasing the selling supply. This lack of coverage and buying pressure means the stock has an even steeper climb ahead to make it back on to a major exchange. (See, What happens to my shares of a company that just received a delisting notice?)

  • How Does It Affect You?
    As a shareholder, you should seriously revisit your investment decision in a company that has become delisted; in many cases, it may be better to cut your losses. A firm unable to meet the listing requirements of the exchange upon which it is traded is quite obviously not in a great position. Each case of delisting needs to be looked at on an individual basis. However, being kicked out of an exclusive club such as the NYSE or the Nasdaq is about as disgraceful for a company as it is prestigious for it to be listed in the first place.

    Even if a company continues to operate successfully after being delisted, the main problem with getting booted from the exclusive club is the trust factor. People lose their faith in the stock. When a stock trades on the NYSE or Nasdaq, it has an aura of reliability and accuracy in reporting financial statements. When a company's stock is demoted to the OTCBB or pink sheets, it loses its reputation. Pink sheet and OTCBB stocks lack the stringent regulation requirements that investors come to expect from NYSE and Nasdaq-traded stocks. Investors are willing to pay a premium for shares of trustworthy companies and are (understandably) leery of firms with shady reputations.

    Another problem for delisted stocks is that many institutional investors are restricted from researching and buying them. Investors who already own a stock prior to the delisting may be forced by their investment mandates to liquidate their positions, further depressing the company's share price by increasing the selling supply. This lack of coverage and buying pressure means the stock has an even steeper climb ahead to make it back on to a major exchange. (See, What happens to my shares of a company that just received a delisting notice?)

  • 10 cents. next OTC- pinksheet and BK. Bad news for Goldman! Traders are shorting coal stocks, bonds and Nat gas.

  • As $2 for ANR is years away

    Sentiment: Strong Sell

  • gbor gbor 2 hours 8 minutes ago Flag

    This will wipe out all common stockholders for sure.

    Sentiment: Strong Sell

  • ACI down 24%

    Sentiment: Strong Sell

BCE
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