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T-Mobile US, Inc. Message Board

ghettopcs 11 posts  |  Last Activity: Dec 8, 2014 7:11 PM Member since: Apr 7, 2013
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  • Reply to

    TMUS "Terriable Mess U Say"

    by ilmplm Dec 5, 2014 10:56 AM
    ghettopcs ghettopcs Dec 5, 2014 3:07 PM Flag

    They turned down Iliad because it wasn't qualified to operate the business. A higher bid wouldn't fix that problem, so no counter-proposal was necessary.

  • Reply to

    SLAVE SHIP NEEDS MORE MONEY

    by osprey.watch3 Dec 8, 2014 5:23 PM
    ghettopcs ghettopcs Dec 8, 2014 6:59 PM Flag

    What does Claure's compensation package look like for next year? Will Sprint be increasing the salary of retail employees any time soon?

  • Reply to

    SLAVE SHIP NEEDS MORE MONEY

    by osprey.watch3 Dec 8, 2014 5:23 PM
    ghettopcs ghettopcs Dec 8, 2014 7:10 PM Flag

    For once we agree; I don't anticipate Sprint raising wages for anyone except the executives. Which is exactly what Osprey is freaking out about.

  • Reply to

    TMUS "Terriable Mess U Say"

    by ilmplm Dec 5, 2014 10:56 AM
    ghettopcs ghettopcs Dec 8, 2014 1:16 PM Flag

    No, you don't have it right. DT wants to sell their controlling stake in a business that other people also own part of. Those other people would take legal action against DT if they attempted to cash out at the expense of the company. That legal action would cost DT a big chunk of that "retirement" money, add a significant amount of time to the process of changing ownership, and most likely scare away the buyer before things got that far anyway. DT, being aware of this, declined further negotiations with Iliad.

    You are thinking like a commodity investor. You have to remember that this is a business which intends to continue operating after a sale, not something like gold that you can buy and dump without consequence.

  • Reply to

    Hey Gettopcs here it is in Black and White

    by easymoney216 Dec 4, 2014 1:53 PM
    ghettopcs ghettopcs Dec 5, 2014 3:11 PM Flag

    I don't think they have anyone's interest in mind beyond their own. But that's also why they can't sell out at the expense of the company; it would be a sure-fire way to start a long and expensive legal battle with the remaining shareholders, and they're literally trying to cover their assets.

  • Reply to

    TMUS "Terriable Mess U Say"

    by ilmplm Dec 5, 2014 10:56 AM
    ghettopcs ghettopcs Dec 8, 2014 2:11 PM Flag

    First, you're wrong about PCS and T-Mobile. It was a reverse merger- MetroPCS acquired 100% of T-Mobile's stock, in exchange for giving DT 74% ownership in the new entity. Essentially MetroPCS absorbed TMUS, changed their stock ticker, and handed over control to DT. Second, nobody said anything about PCS at all.

    And third, as I've told you before, having a majority of voting rights does not mean you're able to make decisions that are blatantly detrimental to the company. It's one thing to make a decision that the other investors disagree with. It's another to make one that would clearly harm the company while leading to personal profits. The latter would surely lead to legal action against them. And in a more general sense, taking a giant dump on their co-investors wouldn't do much for investor sentiment in DT's other investments.

  • Reply to

    TMUS "Terriable Mess U Say"

    by ilmplm Dec 5, 2014 10:56 AM
    ghettopcs ghettopcs Dec 8, 2014 6:57 PM Flag

    I don't agree. I'm not sure why, but you seem to continually misinterpret what I'm saying. I have never, at any point, suggested that the company could not be sold at all or that anyone was required to own it indefinitely. I'm saying that if the party holding the controlling interest intends to make a move that will intentionally harm the company, the remaining investors will take legal action to prevent it.

    Fairly straightforward concept, no? And if the party owning the controlling share of the company was aware of this impending conflict, the most reasonable reaction would be to abandon the contested plan.

  • Reply to

    Hey Gettopcs here it is in Black and White

    by easymoney216 Dec 4, 2014 1:53 PM
    ghettopcs ghettopcs Dec 6, 2014 4:47 PM Flag

    Yes, but in this case they're trying to sell a controlling stake in the company. If they weren't, I think you'd be correct.

  • Reply to

    TMUS "Terriable Mess U Say"

    by ilmplm Dec 5, 2014 10:56 AM
    ghettopcs ghettopcs Dec 8, 2014 7:06 PM Flag

    I agree. Today's drop in price mostly reflects retail investors who fear "diluted" shares (as Osprey was eloquent enough to point out), but overall investor sentiment is good. Raising funds this way will allow the company to continue to expand and develop without relying on a merger or sale in the short term.

  • Reply to

    SLAVERY ALIVE AND WELL AT T-MOBILE

    by osprey.watch3 Dec 1, 2014 7:26 PM
    ghettopcs ghettopcs Dec 5, 2014 3:05 PM Flag

    Serious question- do think anyone investing in a company at that scale is unaware of the executive compensation amounts? And, do you also have a problem with the similar compensation packages being awarded to all of the executives in the other three major companies in this industry?

  • Reply to

    Low to Mid $20's here we come

    by easymoney216 Dec 8, 2014 7:01 PM
    ghettopcs ghettopcs Dec 8, 2014 7:11 PM Flag

    Are you familiar with the story of Chicken Little?

    "Henny Penny, more commonly known as Chicken Little and sometimes as Chicken Licken, is a folk tale with a moral in the form of a cumulative tale about a chicken who believes the world is coming to an end. The phrase "The sky is falling!" features prominently in the story, and has passed into the English language as a common idiom indicating a hysterical or mistaken belief that disaster is imminent."

TMUS
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