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Altria Group Inc. Message Board

happygambler34 11 posts  |  Last Activity: Nov 24, 2014 1:29 PM Member since: Sep 27, 2000
  • happygambler34 happygambler34 Nov 24, 2014 1:29 PM Flag

    Benghazi disaster bottom line is far from over. The facts reported by the 3 brave contractors were totally ignored.

  • happygambler34 happygambler34 Nov 22, 2014 4:05 PM Flag

    Lawsuits will follow, SCOTUS will kill unconstitutional Presidential executive order

    DOJ Found Obama Lacked Authority to Take Action He Took

    The Secretary of Homeland Security and the Counsel to the President directed the Justice Department to investigate whether the president had the authority to take contemplated actions with regard to illegal immigrants via executive order. In a letter dated 19 November, they found he did not. On 20 November, he did it anyway.
    The most interesting aspect of the legal advice President Barack Obama got on the immigration executive action he announced Thursday night may be what lawyers told the president he could not or should not do.
    A 33-page Justice Department legal opinion made public just hours before Obama spoke concluded that he doesn’t have the legal authority to offer broad deportation relief to parents of so-called Dreamers—people who came to the U.S. illegally as children and won a reprieve from deportation in a program known as DACA that Obama created in 2012.
    “As it has been described to us, the proposed deferred action program for parents of DACA recipients would not be a permissible exercise of enforcement discretion,” Justice Department attorney Karl Thompson wrote in the Office of Legal Counsel opinion.
    The opinion also reveals, in a footnote, that Justice Department lawyers informally raised concerns about Obama’s initial 2012 DACA program before it was enacted.
    Thompson’s legal memo about the new immigration initiatives warns the president against straying into areas untethered to policies or priorities Congress has set through legislation. “The Executive cannot, under the guides of exercising enforcement discretion, attempt to effectively rewrite the laws to match its policy preferences,” Thompson wrote. “An agency’s enforcement decisions should be consonant with, rather than contrary to, the congressional policy underlying the statutes the agency is charged with administering.”
    A senior administration official said Thursday lawyers concluded that actions like protection for parents of dreamers were “not legally available” to the president, largely because it would be building one set of executive actions upon another.
    On the one hand, kudos to the administration for promptly releasing the memo. The norm in situations where OLC presents adverse findings is to bury said findings for as long as possible. Releasing the full memo so quickly is the height of transparency and truly laudable.
    It’s worth noting, too, that OLC—rightly in my view—found that the president does have the “authority to prioritize the removal of certain categories of aliens over others,” particularly in light of inadequate funding to pursue the removal of all of them. But they specifically found that “the proposed deferred action program for parents of DACA recipients would not be a permissible exercise of enforcement discretion” precisely because it is not tethered to existing law.

  • happygambler34 by happygambler34 Oct 21, 2014 2:10 PM Flag

    Liberal supported bureaucrats carry on

    GAO report finds thousands of government workers on paid leave, costing tax payers millions

    WASHINGTON – Thousands of federal workers who have been put on administrative leave for more than a month have been allowed to collect a paycheck, and accrue vacation days and pension benefits, while taxpayers were forced to foot the multi-million-dollar bill, according to a new report from the Government Accountability Office.

    Some government employees who broke the rules – meaning they were cited for being untrustworthy or had ongoing issues with co-workers or their bosses -- were allowed to remain on leave for large chunks of time while they challenged their demotions, the 62-page report said.

    The study, released publicly on Monday, marks the first time auditors have taken a look at the scope of administrative leave and its cost to taxpayers.

    During a three-year period, more than 57,000 employees were told to go home – and stay home -- for 30 days or more, costing taxpayers $775 million in salary alone. The report found that 53,000 civilian employees were kept home for one to three months. Another 4,000 were kept off the job for three months to a year and hundreds more for one to three years.

    The report also identified a disparity among how paid leaves were granted and recorded.

    The report listed the Department of Defense as having the highest number of paid leaves on record. During the three fiscal years that ended in September 2013, DOD put 8,600 employees on leave for one to three months, close to 900 for three months to a full year and 123 employees for more than a year.

    Federal agencies have the discretion to put employees on administrative leave for a number of different reasons, including blood donations and snow days.

    Republican Sens. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, Tom Coburn, R-Okla, and Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., requested the GAO report. Grassley, along with Montana Democratic Sen. Jon Tester, have been working together on legislation that would define which employees would be allowed to stay home, reasons paid leave would be granted and the duration.

    The number of federal employees put on paid leave typically eclipses the number at private companies. Private companies will rarely pay employees while investigating claims and in the cases where they do, the leave lasts for only a few days.

    “The private sector is focused on operating efficiently,” Kathy Albarado, chief executive of Helios HR, a consulting firm located in Northern Virginia, told The Washington Post in an interview.

    Jeffrey Neal, a federal personnel manager who retired in 2011 as the Department of Homeland Security’s human capital chief, told the paper, “Unless you think somebody is going to get a gun and shoot people, then send them to work.”

  • Reply to

    Jack Wheeler Defines Barack Hussein Obama

    by happygambler34 Oct 17, 2014 1:40 PM
    happygambler34 happygambler34 Oct 17, 2014 2:22 PM Flag

    LOTUS failures have multiplied since 2008

  • The O-man, Barack Hussein Obama, is an eloquently tailored empty suit. No resume, no accomplishments, no experience, no original ideas, no understanding of how the economy works, no understanding of how the world works, no balls, nothing but abstract, empty rhetoric devoid of real substance.

    He has no real identity. He is half-white, which he rejects. The rest of him is mostly Arab, which he hides but is disclosed by his non-African Arabic surname and his Arabic first and middle names as a way to triply proclaim his Arabic parentage to people in Kenya . Only a small part of him is African Black from his Luo grandmother, which he pretends he is exclusively.

    What he isn't, not a genetic drop of, is 'African-American,' the descendant of enslaved Africans brought to America chained in slave ships. He hasn't a single ancestor who was a slave. Instead, his Arab ancestors were slave owners. Slave-trading was the main Arab business in East Africa for centuries until the British ended it.

    Let that sink in: Obama is not the descendant of slaves, he is the descendant of slave owners. Thus he makes the perfect Liberal Messiah.

    It's something Hillary doesn't understand - how some complete neophyte came out of the blue and stole the Dem nomination from her. Obamamania is beyond politics and reason. It is a true religious cult, whose adherents reject Christianity yet still believe in Original Sin, transferring it from the evil of being human to the evil of being white.

    Thus Obama has become the white liberals' Christ, offering absolution from the Sin of Being White. There is no reason or logic behind it, no faults or flaws of his can diminish it, no arguments Hillary could make of any kind can be effective against it. The absurdity of Hypocrisy Clothed In Human Flesh being their Savior is all the more cause for liberals to worship him: Credo quia absurdum, I believe it because it is absurd.

    Thank heavens that the voting majority of Americans remain Christian and are in no desperate need of a phony savior.

    He is ridiculous and should not be taken seriously by any thinking American.

    And yet he got elected, not once but twice. Thanks to those that did not think it was important to vote for freedom and those that were willing to give up their freedoms for entitlements.

    Remember you don't have to be on a southern plantation to be a slave, if you are dependent on government entitlements you just have a different slave owner.

    PASS THIS ON TO EVERY THINKING AMERICAN YOU KNOW!

  • happygambler34 happygambler34 Oct 17, 2014 10:30 AM Flag

    WOWWWWWWWW!!!!!!

    Pump gasoline prices are up to the low $3's....when do you suppose they'll hit $1.80, which is what they were when LOTUS was inaugurated!!!!!!!

  • happygambler34 happygambler34 Oct 9, 2014 2:13 PM Flag

    Leon Panetta last night on the O'Reilly factor said was not true,
    that it was an attack by terrorists, which he conveyed to Obama the next day
    *********************************************

    To further clarify exactly what the attack was---

    It was a well planned, and organized military attack committed by enemy combatants (Jihad soldiers). Benghazi whistleblower Gregory Hicks, the former deputy chief of mission in Libya, said he was “stunned” to hear Ambassador to the United Nations Susan Rice go on national television and blame the Sept. 11, 2012 terrorist attack on a Youtube video, during testimony before Congress on Wednesday.

    “I was stunned. My jaw dropped, and I was embarrassed,” Hicks told Rep. Trey Gowdy (R-S.C.) during a hearing before the House Committee on Oversight and Reform.

  • happygambler34 happygambler34 Oct 1, 2014 8:33 PM Flag

    “That doesn’t mean ISIL doesn’t still pose a threat. It doesn’t mean they aren’t still trying and in some cases succeeding at taking and holding ground,” he continued. “No one said this would be easy or quick, and no one should be lulled into a false sense of security by accurate air strikes. We will not, we cannot bomb them into obscurity.”

    The Pentagon official told reporters that Iraqi and Kurdish forces are currently in the best position to put pressure on ISIS and that American efforts will require a “long struggle” and “strategic patience.”

    “This group will adapt, and we’re going to have to adapt right along with them,” he said. “And air strikes alone, you’re just not going to bomb them away. It’s not going to happen like that.”

    The Pentagon’s low expectations for U.S. air strikes against ISIS are shared by forces fighting the terror group on the ground in the Middle East.

    Sefqan Ciya, a field commander of People’s Protection Units (YPG), a Kurdish group fighting Isis, told Newsweek in a recent interview: “We in the YPG have been fighting alone for a year, holding out against Isis in Kobane, but the U.S. and the international community are ignoring this fight. The reality is that Isis will not be stopped in northeast Syria unless the international community, above all the U.S. and EU countries, provide us with adequate military aid and cooperate with us in order jointly and effectively to target and attack Isis positions.”

  • Confirming the suspicions of the president’s harshest foreign policy critics, Pentagon officials told reporters this week that they shouldn’t expect air strikes to do much to weaken the Islamic State terrorists gaining ground in Iraq and Syria.

    Despite the approximately 310 U.S strikes on ISIS targets across Iraq and Syria launched by the end of the day Tuesday, Pentagon press secretary Admiral John Kirby said that ISIS “remains a very potent force.”

    Kirby said that ISIS fighters are countering the strikes by attempting to blend in to urban areas where air strikes could cause civilian casualties and being less brazen, but that they still pose a significant threat.

    “Yes, they’re dispersing, and yes, they aren’t communicating quite as openly or as boldly as they once were,” Kirby said. “That’s a good thing, because if they aren’t operating as freely, then they aren’t as free to achieve their goals.

  • Confirming the suspicions of the president’s harshest foreign policy critics, Pentagon officials told reporters this week that they shouldn’t expect air strikes to do much to weaken the Islamic State terrorists gaining ground in Iraq and Syria.

    Despite the approximately 310 U.S strikes on ISIS targets across Iraq and Syria launched by the end of the day Tuesday, Pentagon press secretary Admiral John Kirby said that ISIS “remains a very potent force.”

    Kirby said that ISIS fighters are countering the strikes by attempting to blend in to urban areas where air strikes could cause civilian casualties and being less brazen, but that they still pose a significant threat.

    “Yes, they’re dispersing, and yes, they aren’t communicating quite as openly or as boldly as they once were,” Kirby said. “That’s a good thing, because if they aren’t operating as freely, then they aren’t as free to achieve their goals.

    “That doesn’t mean ISIL doesn’t still pose a threat. It doesn’t mean they aren’t still trying and in some cases succeeding at taking and holding ground,” he continued. “No one said this would be easy or quick, and no one should be lulled into a false sense of security by accurate air strikes. We will not, we cannot bomb them into obscurity.”

    The Pentagon official told reporters that Iraqi and Kurdish forces are currently in the best position to put pressure on ISIS and that American efforts will require a “long struggle” and “strategic patience.”

    “This group will adapt, and we’re going to have to adapt right along with them,” he said. “And air strikes alone, you’re just not going to bomb them away. It’s not going to happen like that.”

    The Pentagon’s low expectations for U.S. air strikes against ISIS are shared by forces fighting the terror group on the ground in the Middle East.

    Sefqan Ciya, a field commander of People’s Protection Units (YPG), a Kurdish group fighting Isis, told Newsweek in a recent interview: “We in the YPG have been fighting alone for a year, holding out against Isis in Kobane, but the U.S. and the international community are ignoring this fight. The reality is that Isis will not be stopped in northeast Syria unless the international community, above all the U.S. and EU countries, provide us with adequate military aid and cooperate with us in order jointly and effectively to target and attack Isis positions.”

  • happygambler34 happygambler34 Sep 23, 2014 9:50 AM Flag

    from the mid to late 20th century onwards, attributed largely to the increased levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide
    *************************************************

    The point, Koonin says, isn't whether the climate is changing, as "the climate has always changed and always will."

    Meanwhile, while the Earth's average surface temperature has risen by 0.9 degree Fahrenheit over the last quarter of the 20th century, the increase has been much slower over the past 16 years, while the human contribution to carbon dioxide has gone up by 25 percent.

    "Yet the models famously fail to capture this slowing in the temperature rise," says Koonin. "Several dozen different explanations for this failure have been offered, with ocean variability most likely playing a major role. But the whole episode continues to highlight the limits of our modeling."

MO
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