Sat, Jul 12, 2014, 7:08 PM EDT - U.S. Markets closed

Recent

% | $
Quotes you view appear here for quick access.

iRobot Corporation Message Board

hemmerjohn9 52 posts  |  Last Activity: Jul 11, 2014 2:26 PM Member since: Apr 30, 2010
SortNewest  |  Oldest  |  Highest Rated Expand all messages
  • Reply to

    Just Bought 20k at 2.26

    by golongn2014 Jul 10, 2014 9:46 AM
    hemmerjohn9 hemmerjohn9 Jul 11, 2014 2:26 PM Flag

    Please do or provide a link. Thanks.

  • Reply to

    Proton Therapy

    by supremerule Jul 5, 2014 11:21 AM
    hemmerjohn9 hemmerjohn9 Jul 7, 2014 9:41 PM Flag

    I would not worry...

    ASTRO Says Few Cancers Qualify for Proton Therapy
    Published: Jun 4, 2014
    By Charles Bankhead, Staff Writer, MedPage Today

    'Action Points

    Evidence to support reimbursement for proton-beam therapy remains limited to several relatively uncommon cancers, although some patients enrolled in clinical trials also should receive coverage consideration.

    Note that American Society for Radiation Oncology officials found sufficient evidence to support reimbursement for ocular tumors, lesions at or near the base of the skull, primary or metastatic tumors of the spine, hepatocellular carcinoma treated with hypofractionated regimens, primary or benign tumors in children, and patients with genetic syndromes that increase the importance of minimizing total radiation volume.'

  • Reply to

    trxc vs titxf

    by phil_inarizona Jun 28, 2014 10:46 AM
    hemmerjohn9 hemmerjohn9 Jul 2, 2014 4:25 PM Flag

    TRXC will be on market sooner (6-18 months) and a little less expensive. More designed for gall bladder removal and places where cauterizing sufficient to close surgery, e.g. cholecystectomies, etc. TITXF will be more sophisticated will be able to do more repair type surgery. There will be market for both and I own both.

  • Reply to

    Scintillating phantom offers CyberKnife QA

    by hemmerjohn9 Jun 23, 2014 8:05 PM
    hemmerjohn9 hemmerjohn9 Jun 25, 2014 11:56 AM Flag

    Why the thumb down? Do you like to remain ignorant about technology?

  • This is an interesting article for MedicalPhysicsWeb. cut and paste to your browser window.

    http://medicalphysicsweb.org/cws/article/research/57638

  • Reply to

    Is ARAY a takeover target?

    by nuthead48 Jun 16, 2014 10:50 AM
    hemmerjohn9 hemmerjohn9 Jun 16, 2014 6:59 PM Flag

    I could go into a lot of detail why. Often it has to do with not invented here syndrome. Personally, I'm glad they have not. Why dilute superior technology with Inferior products.

  • hemmerjohn9 hemmerjohn9 Jun 14, 2014 10:50 AM Flag

    "Newbies, the THRASHING ADAM FINKLESTEIN rants are all one person"

    What you say certainly is not true. Adam Feuerstein is a political science major who claims he understands the Medical and Bio-pharma fields. His articles are unbalanced, negative, opinionated and mostly untrue. They are ususlly intended to drive the price of a stock down. He did this with ISRG. He has done it to other companies. He continues to do it with GALE even after some well documented articles have prove his comments wrong. This the first time I have commented on him.

  • hemmerjohn9 hemmerjohn9 Jun 5, 2014 8:28 PM Flag

    When ISRG dropped from 357 to 87 all high PE stocks dropped likewise. That had nothing to do with the company but more to do with Hospitals getting financing for capital equipment.

  • Reply to

    Market for Proton Beam Therapy Limited

    by hemmerjohn9 Jun 5, 2014 2:09 PM
    hemmerjohn9 hemmerjohn9 Jun 5, 2014 2:12 PM Flag

    ASTRO Says Few Cancers Qualify for Proton Therapy ...continued'''

    For more common types of cancer -- including lung, prostate, and head and neck -- proton beam therapy should qualify for reimbursement if patients are enrolled in clinical trials or multi-institutional registries.
    The policy reflects ASTRO's goal "to provide balanced, evidence-based guidance to payers that ensures access to proton-beam therapy for cancer patients while being judicious stewards of our nation's and our patients' financial resources," ASTRO board chair Colleen A.F. Lawton, MD, said in a statement.

    In identifying and describing appropriate use of proton-beam therapy, the policy lists four circumstances when use of the technology is reasonable:

    - Target volume is close to a critical structure, requiring a steep dose gradient outside the target to limit the structure's exposure.

    - A decrease in dose inhomogeneity in a large treatment volume is required to avoid an excessive "hotspot" within the target volume.

    -Use of photon-based therapy carries an increased risk of clinically meaningful normal-tissue toxicity.

    - The same area or an adjacent area has been previously irradiated, increasing the need for sculpting to limit the cumulative radiation dose.

  • ASTRO Says Few Cancers Qualify for Proton Therapy
    Published: Jun 4, 2014

    ASTRO Says Few Cancers Qualify for Proton Therapy

    By Charles Bankhead, Staff Writer, MedPage Today

    Action Points

    - Evidence to support reimbursement for proton-beam therapy remains limited to several relatively uncommon cancers, although some patients enrolled in clinical trials also should receive coverage consideration.

    - Note that American Society for Radiation Oncology officials found sufficient evidence to support reimbursement for ocular tumors, lesions at or near the base of the skull, primary or metastatic tumors of the spine, hepatocellular carcinoma treated with hypofractionated regimens, primary or benign tumors in children, and patients with genetic syndromes that increase the importance of minimizing total radiation volume.

    Evidence to support reimbursement fo rproton-beam therapy remains limited to several relatively uncommon cancers, although some patients enrolled in clinical trials also should receive coverage consideration, according to the American Society for Radiation Oncology.

    In developing its "model policy," ASTRO officials found sufficient evidence to support reimbursement for ocular tumors, lesions at or near the base of the skull, primary or metastatic tumors of the spine, hepatocellular carcinoma treated with hypofractionated regimens, primary or benign tumors in children, and patients with genetic syndromes that increase the importance of minimizing total radiation volume.

    ... continued..

  • Reply to

    From Bob Foster's Blog

    by hemmerjohn9 May 27, 2014 11:24 PM
    hemmerjohn9 hemmerjohn9 May 29, 2014 11:59 AM Flag

    Pauve, I totally agree with your assessment. I look for companies with the best technology and like them to be as pure a play as possible. I don't like it when they get acquired diluting the technology. Why dilute the Accuray's precision with Varian's Gantries.

  • hemmerjohn9 by hemmerjohn9 May 27, 2014 11:24 PM Flag

    I had a Conversation with Bob Foster last week. He now works for Anova Cancer Care in Denver. The Following is form his Blog.

    The Coming Paradigm Shift In Prostate Cancer Care
    Conventional thinking is that a single platform, free standing radiation oncology practice is no longer financially viable. I am convinced that is not necessarily so.

    A single platform SRS/SBRT radiation oncology practice can succeed. Anova Cancer Care became a market leader in Denver by partnering with numerous specialty physicians and appropriately educating consumers. Anova, a freestanding practice, treated 320-340 patients in 2013. That's close to maximum throughput capability of its G-4 CyberKnife®. Many hospital based CK programs languish in the 150 to 180 patients-per-year range. Some treat far fewer. It doesn't need to be that way. Change is coming. I am betting my career on it.

    The Paradigm Shift
    Data regarding the long term efficacy of CyberKnife® treatment for early sage prostate cancer will soon reach the ten year tipping point. CyberKnife® is then expected to be acknowledged as the gold standard in early stage prostate cancer care. Anova is in position to take advantage of the coming paradigm shift. What are you prepared to do?
    Be proactive. Let's talk about Next Oncology developing a plan, so you can take advantage of the coming paradigm shift.
    Posted by Bob Foster - Next Oncology's Director of Business Development at 9:47 AM

    Labels: Anova Cancer Care, Bob Foster, CyberKnife, Next Oncology. AERO

  • Reply to

    Stktrader gets it right;again

    by stktrader7 May 15, 2014 4:11 PM
    hemmerjohn9 hemmerjohn9 May 24, 2014 11:56 AM Flag

    You sure talk to yourself a lot.

  • Reply to

    RXI is on Track and Managing its Cash Flow

    by lottawatta2013 May 23, 2014 8:59 AM
    hemmerjohn9 hemmerjohn9 May 24, 2014 11:44 AM Flag

    Ben you have to excuse avi.morax ... his goal is to be the next Adam Feuerstein.

  • Reply to

    video

    by greggjohn May 22, 2014 6:11 PM
    hemmerjohn9 hemmerjohn9 May 23, 2014 4:03 PM Flag

    20 treatments/per days, some machines treat as many as 60. At 20 treatments times 250 days/year = 5000 treatments/year... 500 machines = 2,500,000 treatments per year. Not bad.

  • Reply to

    is Cyberknife better than RapidArc?

    by investordilemma May 16, 2014 12:46 PM
    hemmerjohn9 hemmerjohn9 May 21, 2014 10:34 PM Flag

    The cost of building bunkers should be the same for both, Varian is the 900 pound Gorilla in the space. The Radiation Oncologist make more per patients using Varian treatments and are fed patients by Urologist who often are partners in the Radiation Oncology practices. Finally until a couple of years ago there were no CMS codes in many regions for Cyberknife. So when investing in Cyberknife you must be patient.

  • Reply to

    is Cyberknife better than RapidArc?

    by investordilemma May 16, 2014 12:46 PM
    hemmerjohn9 hemmerjohn9 May 20, 2014 11:18 PM Flag

    Two big advantage for the Cyberknife:

    (1) Takes 5 treatments versus 43.
    (2) A lot less expensive both for patient and Insurance Company.

  • hemmerjohn9 hemmerjohn9 May 7, 2014 9:53 PM Flag

    Just curious. I owned ISRG from 2003 to 2012. Now own Titan Medical and TransEnterix TRXC. The make the SurigBot. Have they heard of them?

  • hemmerjohn9 hemmerjohn9 May 6, 2014 12:36 AM Flag

    There another company in this space TransEnterix symbol TRXC.

  • Reply to

    All's Well That Ends Well

    by solarmanmike Apr 24, 2014 6:46 PM
    hemmerjohn9 hemmerjohn9 Apr 24, 2014 11:43 PM Flag

    As a long term investor, I like you commentary on the company. I find it informative and it gives me perspective I cannot get anywhere else. Thanks for your contributions. Forget what the bashers are saying,

    Sentiment: Hold

IRBT
37.52+0.19(+0.51%)Jul 11 3:59 PMEDT

Trending Tickers

i
Trending Tickers features significant U.S. stocks showing the most dramatic increase in user interest in Yahoo Finance in the previous hour over historic norms. The list is limited to those equities which trade at least 100,000 shares on an average day and have a market cap of more than $300 million.