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johnnie_beans 344 posts  |  Last Activity: 3 hours ago Member since: Feb 8, 2005
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  • johnnie_beans johnnie_beans 3 hours ago Flag

    Three companies were recognized in the inverter category,

    1. SolarEdge: Europe, Germany, United Kingdom, Netherlands

    2. Ginlong Technologies - Solis Inverters, United Kingdom

    3. Enphase Energy: United Kindom, Netherlands

  • Reply to

    tried and true Enphase M215

    by r_dohr May 27, 2016 12:34 PM
    johnnie_beans johnnie_beans May 29, 2016 4:35 PM Flag

    SMA presented the Sunny Boy Storage 2.5 at the OTTI PV Symposium, in Germany last week. The new battery unit picked up an Innovation Award at the event.

    The design has several advantages, according to Martin Rothert, head of product management at business unit off-grid and storage at SMA "[These advantages] allowed us to reduce costs significantly,” said Rothert.

  • Reply to

    tried and true Enphase M215

    by r_dohr May 27, 2016 12:34 PM
    johnnie_beans johnnie_beans May 29, 2016 4:29 PM Flag

    New products that mate with batteries like the PowerWall V2 should significantly reduce the cost of adding storage.

    SMA, the maker of Sunny Boy inverters, has unveiled another inverter product in the same line – the Sunny Boy Storage 2.5, which is compatible with the Tesla Powerwall. The new storage inverter does not contain the same components as the Sunny Island inverters, so it is expected to cost half as much. PV Magazine estimated that in US dollars the price might be around $1,100. It has a maximum discharge power of 2.5 kilowatts and can be connected in parallel. The tech specs sheet is here, if you would like to see it. (PDF)

    Reductions in inverter costs have been noted to play a role in the decreasing cost of solar power, as “Component cost reduction, next generation improvements, and incremental production efficiencies will drive savings on the manufacturing side, while new entrants and ongoing price competition will keep margins competitive.”

    This product is not a solar inverter, but a lower-cost energy storage inverter can make electricity storage more attractive, and the new battery storage systems that are coming out are the much-needed complement to solar and wind power.

  • Reply to

    tried and true Enphase M215

    by r_dohr May 27, 2016 12:34 PM
    johnnie_beans johnnie_beans May 29, 2016 3:08 PM Flag

    They have two distinct products. The "StorEdge" includes inverter and is Rule, 21 Rule, 14 compliant and interfaces directly with a Tesla battery and the "StorEdge Interface" that does not include inverter and allows an existing SolarEdge inverter to be connected to a Tesla battery.

  • Reply to

    tried and true Enphase M215

    by r_dohr May 27, 2016 12:34 PM
    johnnie_beans johnnie_beans May 29, 2016 2:22 PM Flag

    "Storedge is not inverter or even a converter"

    This how they describe it: The solution is based on a single inverter that manages and monitors solar energy generation, consumption, and storage.

    The SolarEdge StorEdge™ solutions are based on the SolarEdge StorEdge™ Inverter, SolarEdge Electricity Meter and Auto-transformer.
    The StorEdge™ Inverter controls third-party batteries such as the Tesla home battery, the Powerwall.

    SolarEdge StorEdge™ Inverter

    Single inverter for PV, grid-tied storage and backup power
    Includes the hardware required to provide automatic backup power to backed-up loads in case of grid interruption. Includes all interfaces needed for battery connection

    Auto-Transformer

    Connects to StorEdge™ Inverter to enable backup applications

    SolarEdge Electricity Meter

    The SolarEdge meter is used for battery integration and for production / consumption readings for Feed-in Limitation

    It is an inverter, correct?

  • Reply to

    tried and true Enphase M215

    by r_dohr May 27, 2016 12:34 PM
    johnnie_beans johnnie_beans May 29, 2016 11:51 AM Flag

    Why anyone would want a new system that will never be Smart Grid compliant puzzles me. I would compare costs of Smart Grid systems. Those would include S Series microinverters with Envoy S from Enphase and Smart Grid Inverters like StorEdge from SolarEdge.

    By the way, how do you make all the existing or new M and C Series microinverter system in the world Smart Grid compliant?

  • Reply to

    LG

    by johnnie_beans May 19, 2016 4:41 PM
    johnnie_beans johnnie_beans May 29, 2016 10:34 AM Flag

    As far as I can tell the largest Equana inverter is 15kW. Ideal Power's are 30kW and 125kW.
    LG is working with both companies.

  • "Tesla Gigafactory Grand Opening 2 Months Away"

    The philosophy behind the Gigafactory approach is to utilize economies of scale to make batteries affordable in order to greatly expand their use in transport and energy storage.

    Once the economies of scale kick in, some competitors to battery giants like Tesla and LG may need to drop their prices to a point where they will be unable to compete.

    Watch for Tesla and LG battery storage competitors to drop like flies.

    GLTA

  • "Ultimately, we are trying to create a new market where anyone from individuals to businesses and communities can store their own energy. We have to remember that, above all, the solution has to be affordable. The cost-benefit analysis has to make sense for the customer and that happens at or below $500 per kWh. At $1000/kWh we don’t think you have much of a market."

    In business, never ignore or under estimate your competitors. As the great Andy Grove wrote: "Only The Paranoid Survive".

    Have a great long weekend.

    GLTA

  • johnnie_beans johnnie_beans May 26, 2016 2:51 PM Flag

    Gross margins for new products like the AC batteries during the initial introduction phase are typically lower than otherwise due to lower volumes and not achieving economies of scale when a new product is first introduced.

    Packaging each 1.2kWh of battery in a separate consumer ready enclosure will add cost to the product compared to competing solutions.

  • Overpriced and Under Powered.
    Write that down.

    No charge for the analysis.

    GLTA

  • johnnie_beans johnnie_beans May 25, 2016 8:37 PM Flag

    The EcoBlade is a new Schneider product based on Lithium Ion. It is not available for sale yet. Their existing products use chemistries other than Lithium Ion. They are currently installing an EcoBlade system at one of their own campuses in MA. Presumable that is a test site for testing and refining the product and software. It will also need to go
    through certification.

    What was important to point out was their belief that the price per kWh had to be below $500 to have much of a market for battery storage. In other words if you ask Schneider they would say products selling for higher prices may not do well.

    While everyone is excited about the introduction of battery storage it appears that many overlook how practical it is from a cost benefit standpoint and for the residential market in particular. I know of other inverter companies who are not developing residential products because they do not see the market their yet. They do see the market in utility scale and commercial and industrial scale applications and they are developing products for those markets.

    Other battery companies including Tesla, LG, Sonnen, Acquion and others are targeting utility scale, commercial and industrial applications in addition to residential which gives them multiple markets to sell into. For example, the vast majority of Tesla battery sales to date have been to markets other than residential. Those battery companies, unlike Enphase, have multiple markets to sell into which gives them more opportunities for generating revenues. Enphase on the other hand appears to be targeting their battery technology to the residential markets which appears to be the least ready to absorb batteries due to the current weak economics for batteries in that market. Enphase will say their batteries apply to commercial applications as well but without back up and without lower prices they likely will not sell much into the commercial market where there is even much stronger competition.

  • johnnie_beans johnnie_beans May 25, 2016 4:13 PM Flag

    Taking a deeper dive into a competing system and for those considering purchasing their own storage options or investing in storage companies:

    As previously noted, acsolarwarehouse is offering Enphase AC batteries on sale for $1,600 per 1.2kWh battery installed. Assuming the $1,600 is AUD that would be $1,152 US / 1.2 or $960 US per kWh installed.

    Enphase has never before developed a battery system and the Enphase AC battery does not support backup. Enhpase claims their unique modularity and ease of installation will be the key to their success. They have never claimed that low cost is a design criteria or a requirement for the AC battery.

    Schneider Electric has been providing battery storage systems for years. Primarily to the commercial markets. Their EcoBlade system is modular, easy to install and unlike Enphase management, Schneider management believes low cost will be the key to their battery system success. They claim their EcoBlade storage system will sell for $500 US per kWh installed and it will also provide backup.

    In summary, Enphase management says unique modularity and ease of installation wins. Schneider Electric management on the other hand says low cost will win.

    If Schneider is successful, the Enphase AC battery honeymoon may be short lived and Enphase will start their second crash program to reduce the cost of their AC battery.

    Anyone loaning money to Enphase or buying their stock should be knowledgeable of the competition and should believe as Enphase management does that unique modularity and easy of installations wins over cost.

    If you like your battery boxes on your garage wall take a look at the EcoBlade video and decide which company's system you would buy for yourself and which system the markets will favor.

    Google youtube video: EcoBlade, The Intelligent Energy Storage System

  • Trending now: Vertical integration competition heating up
    May 25, 2016

    :Full vertical integration is a dream for almost all solar companies, offering the ability to control manufacturing, sales and installation and have a cost-competitive system. First Solar and SunEdison have it figured out on the large scale, although SunEdison’s recent market troubles bring uncertainty to its foothold. Now two players in the residential market are asserting their dominance: SunPower and SolarCity."

    SolarCity has been slowly acquiring companies and experience over the years to turn from a solar leasing company to one that provides the full gamut of products. The company bought mounting manufacturer Zep Solar in 2013 and module manufacturer Silevo in 2014. A brand new 1-GW manufacturing plant in Buffalo, New York, is scheduled to begin production of SolarCity-branded solar panels by summer 2017. Throw in a close, family-like relationship with Tesla batteries and all SolarCity is missing is an in-house inverter, but that could soon be coming.

    With stated plans to become the most vertically integrated solar company in the world, SolarCity wants to control every aspect of the solar business, from manufacturing to installation and financing.

    If you identify potential candidates that address the same residential and commercial markets as SolarCity there are not many and one stands out above the rest. Not sure it is for sale but an offer is possible.

  • johnnie_beans johnnie_beans May 25, 2016 2:40 PM Flag

    "Successful foray into commercial markets doubtful as SCTY tailwinds minor and the entrenched players have deep pockets. "

    Their growth in commercial is not dependent on SCTY if that is what you are suggesting. You know they reported their business with SCTY is now less than 10%.

    SCTY is working toward being totally integrated like SunPower and they lack a residential and commercial inverter technology of their own. They could potentially buy SEDG or ENPH but they already have a significant number of SEDG systems deployed and SCTY could use the revenues and profits from a successful and growing inverter company that is not also trying to be a battery company. That limits their choices and they already have a battery partner so they do not need the Enphase AC battery or its associated market risks.

  • Perhaps some day we will see LG panels with LG inverters from Ideal Power?

    London council ‘proves commercial scale energy storage works in the UK’
    By Tom Kenning May 24, 2016 4:26 PM BST

    The London Borough of Hounslow has installed what it claims to be the largest PV array of any local authority in the UK at 1.73MW capacity, alongside four 60kWh lithium ion batteries from Germany-based commercial battery system provider Tesvolt. The system will provide the site of Western International Market (WIM), west London’s largest wholesale market for fresh produce and flowers, with around half of its 3.5MWh yearly energy requirements.

    Went said: “So far, for the commercial scale [projects], there simply haven’t been the technical requirements available, such as being able to run high currents on the existing energy storage systems.

    “With a Tesvolt solution, commercial and industrial customers can now cover these requirements and have the possibilities to increase their self-sufficiency rate of renewables, implement an emergency supply function, or simply do frequency balancing and/or peak-shaving.”

    LG Electronics, Imtech, Sunstruck Energy, SolarEdge, Tesvolt, and Revolution Energy Services were all involved in the project. LG Solar provided more than 6,000 panels and SolarEdge was responsible for the inverter.

  • London council ‘proves commercial scale energy storage works in the UK’
    By Tom Kenning May 24, 2016 4:26 PM BST

    The London Borough of Hounslow has installed what it claims to be the largest PV array of any local authority in the UK at 1.73MW capacity, alongside four 60kWh lithium ion batteries from Germany-based commercial battery system provider Tesvolt. The system will provide the site of Western International Market (WIM), west London’s largest wholesale market for fresh produce and flowers, with around half of its 3.5MWh yearly energy requirements.

    Went said: “So far, for the commercial scale [projects], there simply haven’t been the technical requirements available, such as being able to run high currents on the existing energy storage systems.

    “With a Tesvolt solution, commercial and industrial customers can now cover these requirements and have the possibilities to increase their self-sufficiency rate of renewables, implement an emergency supply function, or simply do frequency balancing and/or peak-shaving.”

    LG Electronics, Imtech, Sunstruck Energy, SolarEdge, Tesvolt, and Revolution Energy Services were all involved in the project. LG Solar provided more than 6,000 panels and SolarEdge was responsible for the inverter.

  • johnnie_beans johnnie_beans May 25, 2016 8:41 AM Flag

    You, just like Enphase management, ignores competition.

    I would make note of the fact that the harder you pump Enphase the lower the stock price goes and the worse their financial results become each quarter.

    Enphase management ignored the competition in the MLPE business and let a competitor eat their lunch. Enphase is now spending a lot of money struggling to take back market share by eliminating profit and at the same time spending a lot of money developing a battery storage product and again apparently ignoring the competition in that market. Paul and Kris appear to prefer to play in the technology sandbox rather than preferring to lead a company to make profits.

    The Schneider Electric EcoBlade is not generally available yet. They (not me) claim it will sell for less than $500 per kWh installed. I consider Schneider Electric a reputable company that knows what they are talking about and what they can accomplish with battery storage since they have been in that business for many years in the commercial market. When they do introduce the EcoBlade for residential applications they will become the next competitor that will eat Enphase's lunch.

    People like you who ignore or dismiss competition will continue to invest in Enphase and you will once again watch Enphase management get caught with their pants down when Schneider introduces the EcoBlade for $500 per kWh which Enphase will be unable to match.

    Ignore or dismiss competition at your own peril. Good luck to all.

  • acsolarwarehouse is running an introductory sale for the Enphase AC battery.
    Their price is $1,600 per A/C battery installed. $50 deposit required. Each battery outputs 270 Watts and 1.2kWh. Correct me if I am wrong, but that works out to $1,333 per kWh.

    Unlike most of the posters here, those who follow the competition know that Schneider is offering a battery storage system completely installed for $500 per kWh. Schneider Electric is no newcomer to the battery storage market like Enphase is and here is their assessment of the market.

    "Ultimately, we are trying to create a new market where anyone from individuals to businesses and communities can store their own energy. We have to remember that, above all, the solution has to be affordable. The cost-benefit analysis has to make sense for the customer and that happens at or below $500 per kWh. At $1000/kWh we don’t think you have much of a market."

    If Schneider Electric has any credibility in the battery storage market where does that leave Enphase at $1,333 per kWh on sale?

    Unlike the folks at Schneider Electric, Enphase management and Enphase pumpers would argue the price of the Enphase AC battery is not even an issue and they do not even go there. The fact that you can start by buying only one or two batteries and your child can install them is why Enphase will be very successful selling their AC batteries.

    Schneider also know where the demand is and it is not the residential market that Enphase is targeting.

    "At $500/kWh, though, the market is potentially enormous, so where does Schneider Electric begin? Ruiz notes that “the first place to start is with the commercial and industrial building, whether in rich economies or the developing world.” This is a market Schneider Electric estimates at roughly $20 billion."

    Caveat: Paul and Kris would likely disagree after burning a big hole in the balance sheet.

    PS: No charge for the Schneider education. If you are an idiot be sure to hit thumbs down.

  • Reply to

    Tesla batteries

    by johnnie_beans May 24, 2016 4:36 PM
    johnnie_beans johnnie_beans May 24, 2016 7:13 PM Flag

    "I don't know why you hang out here other than you must feel threatened from the competition Enphase.poses."

    I don't believe in love fests like you and many other Enphase posters. When I invest in an industry I always follow competition. If I own a particular inverter company of course I am threatened by the competition and want to know exactly what they are up to. Something you and Enphase apparently neglected to do when SolarEdge came along and stole their lunch.

GTAT
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