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kidmadeira 45 posts  |  Last Activity: 9 hours ago Member since: Oct 17, 1999
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  • For one long year, United Technologies (NYSE: UTX ) stock has budged not at all -- or so you might think.
    At $108 and change, shares of United Technologies are up less than one single percentage point after 52 weeks of trading. It almost seems as if the stock of one of the world's great industrial conglomerates has sat idly by while the rest of the S&P 500 soared 18%.
    But in fact, United Technologies stock has had quite a wild ride over this past year.
    ow back essentially where the stock started one year ago, it's time for investors to ask: What are the chances United Technologies will succeed in playing catch-up with the rest of the market once more? And should investors try to catch a ride on this train before it departs the proverbial station?
    Let's crunch a few numbers and see if we can figure out an answer to that question.
    Valuing United Technologies stock
    Priced at 17.1 times earnings (according to data from S&P Capital IQ), but expected by most analysts to grow these earnings at only 10% annually over the next five years, United Technologies stock looks pretty expensive today -- even after it's gone all the way back to square one. Simply put, if "value investors" prefer to buy stocks at PEG ratios of 1.0 or less, then United Technologies' valuation of 1.7 is probably too much to pay.
    And this is before you notice that United Technologies stock is burdened with $15 billion in net debt -- giving UTC an enterprise value 15% more expensive than its market capitalization. It's also before you consider that free cash flow at United Technologies currently lags reported net income at just $5.5 billion in FCF, versus $5.8 billion reported "profits."
    Result: UTC's light free cash flow number and its heavy debt load add up to an enterprise value to free cash flow ratio of nearly 21 on United Technologies stock.
    Hope springs eternal
    Admittedly, there are factors that have been weighing down United Technologies stock of late -- factors that could change in the future. For one thing, the company took a large charge to earnings this year over complications with its contract to deliver 28 Cyclone-class maritime helicopters to the Canadian government. That charge pushed UTC's entire Sikorsky helicopter division into the red for its results year to date.
    That being said, the contract appears back on track today. Moreover, Sikorsky has landed multiple new, billion-dollar-plus contracts in recent months to build helicopters for everyone from the U.S. Air Force to the Turkish government. It also recently secured a refresh of its five-decade-long franchise building "Marine 1" helicopters for the U.S. President.
    In short, things are looking up for Sikorsky -- and not just for Sikorsky. Otis Elevator, UTC's most profitable division and one of its bigger businesses, just recorded 44% more orders for elevators in the key North American market in Q2 than it did in the second quarter of 2013. 44% year-over-year growth? That has to be good for the stock. And overall, sales are up for United Technologies as a whole, too.
    ... but reality still bites
    All of that being said, take all the good news coming out of United Technologies today, tally the numbers -- and analysts are still estimating only 10% earnings growth over the next five years. At the end of the day, that's simply not fast enough growth to justify paying nearly 21 times free cash flow for this business.
    Long story short, while there may be a lot to like about United Technologies stock, the stock price is not one of them. So, to answer the question we asked at the beginning: No, I would not be a buyer at these levels.
    Don't forget the dividend
    United Technologies stock may not be a buy -- but with a 2.2% dividend yield, it may not be a sell, either. The smartest investors know that dividend stocks simply crush their non-dividend paying counterparts over the long term. That's beyond dispute. They also know that a well-constructed dividend portfolio creates wealth steadily, while still allowing you to sleep like a baby. Knowing how valuable such a portfolio might be, our top analysts put together a report on a group of high-yielding stocks that should be in any income investor's portfolio.

  • This bloated pig is going down!

  • Reply to

    UTC

    by kidmadeira Aug 28, 2014 10:49 AM
    kidmadeira kidmadeira Aug 28, 2014 1:17 PM Flag

    airborne,.....Maybe Louie should take some Viagra, better performance........Kid

  • kidmadeira by kidmadeira Aug 28, 2014 10:49 AM Flag

    United Technologies Corp. said Wednesday it would be sending more of its profits back to investors by expanding its share buyback program.
    The Hartford-based parent company of Pratt & Whitney, Sikorsky Aircraft and Otis Elevators expects to spend an additional $100 million on its share repurchase program on top of the $1.25 billion it planned to do all along.
    The investment comes as the company's share price has fallen from record highs of $120.09 in June to a yearly low of $99.94. The price has slowly recovered, trading Wednesday at $109.09 on the New York Stock Exchange.
    Last year, United Technologies repurchased $1.2 billion of its stock. The company held off on buybacks in 2012, the year it closed on its acquisition of Goodrich Corp. for $16.5 billion. Before that, United Technologies spent $2.175 billion in 2011 and $2.2 billion in 2010 on share repurchases.
    United Technologies also on Wednesday raised its expected sales marks for the year. In a March investor presentation, Chief Financial Officer Greg, J. Hayes said the company expected to have $64 billion in sales for 2014. On Wednesday, before another meeting of investors, the company said it should see $65 billion in sales.
    The new marks line up closer to what Wall Street expects to see the company report in January, when fourth-quarter and full-year results are due. A survey of analysts expects sales of $65.5 billion. Wall Street also expects per share earnings from United Technologies of $6.85, which lands on the very top end of a range the company reaffirmed Wednesday of $6.75 to $6.85 a share.
    Last year, United Technologies reported net income of $5.7 billion on sales of $62.6 billion.

  • kidmadeira by kidmadeira Aug 28, 2014 10:48 AM Flag

    United Technologies Corp. said Wednesday it would be sending more of its profits back to investors by expanding its share buyback program.
    The Hartford-based parent company of Pratt & Whitney, Sikorsky Aircraft and Otis Elevators expects to spend an additional $100 million on its share repurchase program on top of the $1.25 billion it planned to do all along.
    The investment comes as the company's share price has fallen from record highs of $120.09 in June to a yearly low of $99.94. The price has slowly recovered, trading Wednesday at $109.09 on the New York Stock Exchange.
    Last year, United Technologies repurchased $1.2 billion of its stock. The company held off on buybacks in 2012, the year it closed on its acquisition of Goodrich Corp. for $16.5 billion. Before that, United Technologies spent $2.175 billion in 2011 and $2.2 billion in 2010 on share repurchases.
    United Technologies also on Wednesday raised its expected sales marks for the year. In a March investor presentation, Chief Financial Officer Greg, J. Hayes said the company expected to have $64 billion in sales for 2014. On Wednesday, before another meeting of investors, the company said it should see $65 billion in sales.
    The new marks line up closer to what Wall Street expects to see the company report in January, when fourth-quarter and full-year results are due. A survey of analysts expects sales of $65.5 billion. Wall Street also expects per share earnings from United Technologies of $6.85, which lands on the very top end of a range the company reaffirmed Wednesday of $6.75 to $6.85 a share.
    Last year, United Technologies reported net income of $5.7 billion on sales of $62.6 billion.

  • Reply to

    Rheem Waterheaters - UTX

    by meteorbyte Aug 24, 2014 9:30 PM
    kidmadeira kidmadeira Aug 26, 2014 10:33 AM Flag

    flyer, .......Certainly personal experience is important and helps you make future choices. I have bought a few items from Lowe's, name brand dishwasher, kitchen range and dryer, fortunately, I have had no problems. What I like about Lowe's is that they stock the items witch are available for immediate pickup or delivery. Another topic, avoid Direct Buy, they're a scam. I reluctantly attended their pitch in Tampa. The joining fee was $4,900. and had to be purchased immediately. After the pitch was over, we were asked to wait in the next room for a personal discussion. We looked at one another and decided to walk out the door, which I had to unlock........Kid

  • Reply to

    Rheem Waterheaters - UTX

    by meteorbyte Aug 24, 2014 9:30 PM
    kidmadeira kidmadeira Aug 25, 2014 8:33 PM Flag

    airborne,......We got rheemed on this stock this year!....It aint over until Hillary Clinton sings...........Kid

  • Reply to

    Rheem Waterheaters - UTX

    by meteorbyte Aug 24, 2014 9:30 PM
    kidmadeira kidmadeira Aug 25, 2014 3:25 PM Flag

    flyer,.......Having two production lines for the same product like a refrigerator would seem to be a logistical nightmare. Whirlpool makes many Kenmore appliances, parts are interchangeable. Like Buick, Oldsmobile and Chevy, just minor cosmetics and different nameplate. The upscale is in the appointments, mechanically, there is little difference. BTW, GE is looking to sell it's appliance business. I don't think GE knows what it wants to be when it grows up. I still don't like paying more taxes than GE does.......Kid

  • Reply to

    Rheem Waterheaters - UTX

    by meteorbyte Aug 24, 2014 9:30 PM
    kidmadeira kidmadeira Aug 25, 2014 10:19 AM Flag

    meteor..(.Rheem Manufacturing Company is an American privately held manufacturer that produces residential and commercial water heaters and boilers, as well as heating, ventilating and air conditioning equipment).....................Rheem has no connection to UTC.......Kid

  • kidmadeira by kidmadeira Aug 19, 2014 1:42 PM Flag

    Board is acting weird. Posts are being deleted. I think Sumo spit into the well, now, it may not be good to drink the water. I'm within $2. of being even on my last UTX buy, I will catch the dividend. As soon as I go positive, I may liquidate my last buy, UTX is too boring. My Momo stocks keep delivering, CELG, FB etc.

  • Reply to

    pratt

    by suemoe_99 Aug 18, 2014 11:27 AM
    kidmadeira kidmadeira Aug 18, 2014 12:55 PM Flag

    Sumo,...You can't just make stuff up. Yes, apparently "UTC Propulsion & Aerospace " is the umbrella for Pratt and UTC Aerospace Systems. Pratt had greater revenues than UTC Aerospace in the last annual report, Aerospace did have better profit. It doesn't matter how they arrange the deck chairs, what matters are revenues, earnings and dividends. When the GTF kicks in, Pratt will get a boost. Of course, Pratt needs to deliver what it promised. Midas and Firestone do brakes.

  • Reply to

    787 engine

    by kidmadeira Aug 11, 2014 9:42 AM
    kidmadeira kidmadeira Aug 13, 2014 7:58 PM Flag

    myyddogal,....Was in Florida last week, gasoline was as low as $3.14, back in CT gas is about 70¢-80¢ higher. ....Kid

  • Reply to

    787 engine

    by kidmadeira Aug 11, 2014 9:42 AM
    kidmadeira kidmadeira Aug 13, 2014 10:01 AM Flag

    ctb,....Thanks! My own personal flying experience, I was flying from Miami to San Juan, P.R. in a Lockheed 1011 when the pilot shut down the center engine, did a fuel dump from the wing tips which I photographed and did an ATD, air turn back, to Miami. We were loaded into another Lockheed 1011 and resumed our trip. The flight attendant said there was bad news and good news, the bad news was that there would be no meal service since food can only be loaded once on an airliner, the good news was that there would be free drinks, I didn't get any.....Kid

  • Reply to

    787 engine

    by kidmadeira Aug 11, 2014 9:42 AM
    kidmadeira kidmadeira Aug 12, 2014 4:18 PM Flag

    The Gimli Glider is the nickname of an Air Canada aircraft that was involved in an unusual aviation incident. On July 23, 1983, Air Canada Flight 143, a Boeing 767-233 jet, ran out of fuel at an altitude of 41,000 feet (12,000 m) MSL, about halfway through its flight originating in Montreal to Edmonton. The crew were able to glide the aircraft safely to an emergency landing at Gimli Industrial Park Airport, a former Royal Canadian Air Force base in Gimli, Manitoba.
    The subsequent investigation revealed a combination of company failures and a chain of human errors that defeated built-in safeguards. Fuel loading was miscalculated due to a misunderstanding of the recently adopted metric system which replaced the imperial system.
    History
    On July 22, 1983, Air Canada's Boeing 767 (registration C-GAUN, c/n 22520/47)[2] flew from Toronto to Edmonton where it underwent routine checks. The next day, it was flown to Montreal. Following a crew change, it departed Montreal as Flight 143 for the return trip to Edmonton, with Captain Robert (Bob) Pearson, 48, and First Officer Maurice Quintal at the controls.
    Running out of fuel[edit]
    On July 23, 1983, flight 143 was cruising at 41,000 feet (12,000 m) over Red Lake, Ontario. The aircraft's cockpit warning system sounded, indicating a fuel pressure problem on the aircraft's left side. Assuming a fuel pump had failed[3] the pilots turned it off,[3] since gravity should feed fuel to the aircraft's two engines. The aircraft's fuel gauges were inoperative because of an electronic fault which was indicated on the instrument panel and airplane logs (the pilots believed the flight was legal with this malfunction). The flight management computer indicated that there was still sufficient fuel for the flight; but the initial fuel load had been measured in pounds instead of kilograms. A few moments later, a second fuel pressure alarm sounded for the right engine, prompting the pilots to divert to Winnipeg. Within seconds, the left engine failed and they began preparing for a single-engine landing.
    As they communicated their intentions to controllers in Winnipeg and tried to restart the left engine, the cockpit warning system sounded again with the "all engines out" sound, a long "bong" that no one in the cockpit could recall having heard before and that was not covered in flight simulator training.[3] Flying with all engines out was something that was never expected to occur and had therefore never been covered in training.[4] Seconds later, with the right-side engine also stopped, the 767 lost all power, and most of the instrument panels in the cockpit went blank.
    The 767 was one of the first airliners to include an Electronic Flight Instrument System (EFIS), which operated on the electricity generated by the aircraft's jet engines. With both engines stopped, the system went dead, leaving only a few basic battery-powered emergency flight instruments. While these provided sufficient information with which to land the aircraft, a vertical speed indicator—that would indicate the rate at which the aircraft was descending and therefore how long it could glide unpowered—was not among them.
    On airliners the size of the 767, the engines also supply power for the hydraulic systems without which the aircraft cannot be controlled. Such aircraft are therefore required to accommodate this kind of power failure. With the 767, this is usually achieved through the automated deployment of a ram air turbine, a hydraulic pump (and on some airplanes a generator) driven by a small propeller, which in turn is driven by the forward motion of the aircraft through the air. As the Gimli pilots were to experience on their landing approach, a decrease in this forward speed means a decrease in the power available to control the aircraft.
    Landing at Gimli[edit]
    In line with their planned diversion to Winnipeg, the pilots were already descending through 35,000 feet (11,000 m)[2] when the second engine shut down. They immediately searched their emergency checklist for the section on flying the aircraft with both engines out, only to find that no such section existed.[3] Captain Pearson was an experienced glider pilot, so he was familiar with flying techniques almost never used by commercial pilots. To have the maximum range and therefore the largest choice of possible landing sites, he needed to fly the 767 at the "best glide speed". Making his best guess as to this speed for the 767, he flew the aircraft at 220 knots (410 km/h; 250 mph). First Officer Maurice Quintal began to calculate whether they could reach Winnipeg. He used the altitude from one of the mechanical backup instruments, while the distance traveled was supplied by the air traffic controllers in Winnipeg, measuring the distance the aircraft's echo moved on their radar screens. The aircraft lost 5,000 feet (1,500 m) in 10 nautical miles (19 km; 12 mi), giving a glide ratio of approximately 12:1.
    At this point, Quintal proposed landing at the former RCAF Station Gimli, a closed air force base where he had once served as a Royal Canadian Air Force pilot. Unknown to him, part of the facility had been converted to a race track complex, now known as Gimli Motorsports Park.[5] It includes a road race course, a go-kart track, and a dragstrip. A Canadian Automobile Sport Clubs-sanctioned sports car race hosted by the Winnipeg Sports Car Club was under way the Saturday of the incident and the area around the decommissioned runway was full of cars and campers. Part of the decommissioned runway was being used to stage the race.[6]
    Without power, the pilots attempted lowering the aircraft's main landing gear via a gravity drop. The main gear locked into position, but the nose wheel did not, which later turned out to be advantageous. As the aircraft slowed on approach to landing, the ram air turbine generated less power, rendering the aircraft increasingly difficult to control.
    As the runway drew near, it became apparent that the aircraft was coming in too high and fast, raising the danger of running off the runway before it could be stopped. The lack of hydraulic pressure prevented flap/slat extension which would have, under normal landing conditions, reduced the stall speed of the aircraft and increased the lift coefficient of the wings to allow the aircraft to be slowed for a safe landing. The pilots briefly considered a 360-degree turn to reduce speed and altitude, but decided that they did not have enough altitude for the maneuver. Pearson decided to execute a forward slip to increase drag and lose altitude. This maneuver is commonly used with gliders and light aircraft to descend more quickly without increasing forward speed.
    As soon as the wheels touched down on the runway, Pearson "stood on the brakes", blowing out two of the aircraft's tires. The unlocked nose wheel collapsed and was forced back into its well, causing the aircraft's nose to slam into, bounce off, and then scrape along the ground. This helped to slow the airplane and avoid injuring the people on the ground. The nose also grazed the guardrail now dividing the strip, which further slowed it down.[3]

  • kidmadeira by kidmadeira Aug 11, 2014 9:42 AM Flag

    The pilot of a 787 Dreamliner was forced to shut down one of the plane’s two engines about one and a half hours into a scheduled nine-and-a-half hour flight from the Dominican Republic to Manchester, England. The plane, one of six 787-800s owned by Thomson Airways, made a safe emergency landing in the Azores about four hours after the engine was shut down.
    No explanation has been offered yet for the sudden engine failure, but this is a first for the aircraft since The Boeing Co. (NYSE: BA) delivered its first 787 in the fall of 2011. The plane entered production about four years late and cost the company about five-times the original $6 billion estimate. Thomson Airways was Boeing’s U.K. launch customer and received its first 787 in June of 2013.
    The first major issue with the plane was a delamination of the composite skin on the plane’s fuselage. A more spectacular problem arose when a battery pack in a parked 787-800 ignited. The problems with the lithium-ion batteries appears to have been sorted out, but it caused a three-month ban on all 787 flights in early 2013.
    The General Electric Co. (NYSE: GE) built the GEnx-1B engines that are used on the Thomson 787-800 fleet. A different version of the engine, the GEnx-2B, is also used on Boeing’s latest version of its 747-8 jumbo jet. A series of incidents involving both engines caused the National Transportation Safety Board to have all the engines inspected in October of 2012.
    While the engine loss gave the passengers a fright — one little girl asked her parents, “What if we don’t make it?” — modern airplane engines installed on two-engine planes like the 787 are designed to be able to complete their full flight from any point on the flight plan with just one operating engine. We’re sure that doesn’t make a passenger’s experience any less terrifying.

  • Peyton R. Patterson, who gained statewide prominence a decade ago leading the conversion of New Haven Savings Bank into a publicly-traded company, has resigned from her current post as chief executive of a New Canaan-based lender, citing personal reasons.
    Patterson's resignation from Bankwell Financial Group, Inc. is effective immediately.
    "I am incredibly proud of what we achieved during my time at Bankwell and did not want my personal matters to overshawdow the accomplishments and hard work of our team," Patterson said, in a statement.
    Earlier this year, published reports disclosed that Patterson had personal financial struggles. Since Sept. 2013, judges involved in lawsuits by American Express and two private country clubs ordered her to repay almost $393,000 in debts, The Hartford Business Journal reported, citing court records.
    In 2004, the conversion of New Haven Savings involved raising more than $1 billion in an initial public offering and simultaneously acquiring two Hartford-area banks, one of the most complicated deals in the state's banking history. A new bank, NewAlliance Bank, was formed in the conversion and merger with Savings Bank of Manchester and Tolland Bank.
    Before NewAlliance was sold to First Niagara in 2011 -- and Patterson reaped a $16 million CEO exit package -- she pursued an aggressive acquisition strategy that snagged banks such as West Springfield-based Westbank, Cornerstone Bank in Stamford and the Hartford asset management company, Trust Co. of Connecticut.
    Those acquisitions extended the bank's market north to Massachusetts and south into the state's Gold Coast. Trust Co. of Connecticut nearly tripled the size of its asset management business.
    As Bankwell's CEO, Patterson has united three smaller community banks under one name. The bank also announced its first acquisition outside of Fairfield County in April. In May, Patterson led a $48.6 million initial public offering at Bankwell and appeared to be pursuing a growth strategy similar to NewAlliance: expand the bank through acquisitions and win customers with a strong brand.
    Copyright © 2014, The Hartford Courant

  • kidmadeira by kidmadeira Aug 8, 2014 3:45 PM Flag

    When I have a hard 16 at the $5. blackjack table and the dealer has a face card showing, I surrender and get 1/2 my bet back. Now, I have to surrender with regard to the UTX dividend schedule. Yes, UTX raises the dividend every 5 quarters! The $5. blackjack table can be dangerous, anything can happen there with many inexperienced players. If UTX can go up another $5, I'll be even on my last buy. Like the blackjack table, I don't put more on the table that I can't afford to lose..........Kid

  • Reply to

    If I remember correctly...

    by ndfirstsection Aug 8, 2014 12:13 PM
    kidmadeira kidmadeira Aug 8, 2014 12:43 PM Flag

    (It has been four quarters since an increase and they usually do one every five quarters)........This has become an Urban Legend, see prior posts. Historically, UTC pays the same dividend for 5 quarters and increases the dividend on the 6th quarter. So, UTC has historically increased dividends every 6 quarters......Kid

  • Reply to

    $15 BB in market cap lost in July

    by mullam4444 Aug 1, 2014 8:09 PM
    kidmadeira kidmadeira Aug 8, 2014 10:42 AM Flag

    flyer,....Dates shown are ex-div dates, so, relax. From past topics, the UTC Fuel Cell division was sold by UTC and has since gone bankrupt. Now, there are talks of a South Korean company stepping in to resume manufacturing......Kid

  • Reply to

    $15 BB in market cap lost in July

    by mullam4444 Aug 1, 2014 8:09 PM
    kidmadeira kidmadeira Aug 8, 2014 10:25 AM Flag

    flyer,.......Some facts:..........Nov 13, 2013 0.59 Dividend .....Aug 14, 2013 0.535 Dividend....... May 15, 2013 0.535 ......Dividend .......Feb 13, 2013 0.535 Dividend ......Nov 14, 2012 0.535 Dividend ....Aug 15, 2012 0.535 Dividend, facts show that UTX pays one rate for 5 quarters and then on the 6th quarter increases the dividend. So, the dividend is increased every 6 quarters.......Kid

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