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Intel Corporation Message Board

mega.hurts 220 posts  |  Last Activity: 8 hours ago Member since: Jan 11, 2008
  • Initially AE made an assertion that Microsoft would be unable to deliver a phone for Verizon or Sprint in 2015 if Microsoft chose x86 for a future version of Windows Phone. Some of us challenged that assertion although for different reasons. I made the case that most U.S. carriers have already deployed LTE for data and T-mobile & AT&T have already launched support for VoLTE also. Verizon is behind with VoLTE but according to Engadget May 20 of this year, Verizon says it will offer VoLTE support this year, in 2014 - see "Verizon's next-gen voice service still planned for this year, will come with video calling". Most importantly Verizon says unlike other carriers that rolled out VoLTE incrementally, they will launch VoLTE support nationwide from the start.

    So IF Verizon is truthful there won't be a need for CDMA fallback with Verizon after this year. Even if Verizon misses their schedule by six months they should still have VoLTE by 2015 when Microsoft might release a 100% x86 based phone.

    Now here comes a confusing comment in AE's article.

    "the 3G standards -- including CDMA -- will be phased out in favor of LTE for voice and data. Once this happens (Verizon thinks it can complete this transition by 2021), lack of CDMA support will no longer impede Intel's efforts to gain share in U.S. based handsets."

    The text, "Verizon thinks it can complete this transition by 2021" suggests that an LTE phone cannot operate on Verizon's network without CDMA fallback for another seven years. I don't believe that's what its saying. I believe the 2021 date is referring to how long Verizon may keep some portion of CDMA operations alive but this may be for legacy devices and specialized applications having nothing to do with smartphones.

    This appears to be a clever slight of hand to suggest a far longer dependency on CDMA than is warranted.
    And as Blueredmonk pointed out, a smartphone with an x86 CPU and separate modem eliminates the CDMA issue altogether.

  • Reply to

    OT: marsavian software

    by theblueredmonk 15 hours ago
    mega.hurts mega.hurts 13 hours ago Flag

    If one limits the discussion to highly static environments and a very narrow set of applications the argument might improve. Although Intel is now prepared to make custom chip solutions for the types of workload you're referring to so it will not be easy even on technical terms. Ultimately there needs to be a compelling economic case. ARM can always hope.

  • Reply to

    AE's Latest Article

    by wallisweaver 23 hours ago
    mega.hurts mega.hurts 14 hours ago Flag

    Yes, the topic of voice & data over LTE is more involved but my main issue with AE's statement was his blanket assertion that Microsoft would be simply shut out of Verizon and Sprint if they select x86 for the app processor. It's just not the case, especially in 2015. Your example shows another reason AE's statement was flawed.

  • Reply to

    OT: marsavian software

    by theblueredmonk 15 hours ago
    mega.hurts mega.hurts 15 hours ago Flag

    Suppose you're buying equipment for your server farm. You could buy x86 based servers and simply know that it will run everything in the Linux/Unix/MS world, or you could buy ARM servers to use on the subset of Linux applications. Unless there is some huge cost advantage upfront (which is not likely the case) or operating cost advantage (also not likely the case) it would be unwise to buy the equipment that is limited in its use. And later, when one is ready to upgrade to newer gear the ARM-based equipment will not have the same value in the secondary market because of its limitations.

    Total cost of ownership includes the residual value of the gear when traded and the ARM gear is likely to be less favorable to the owner.

    It's a bit like Windows RT tablets. Yes, it can be built, and yes it can run some applications but there's no compelling reason to buy it given the availability of more versatile products at comparable cost.

  • Reply to

    AE's Latest Article

    by wallisweaver 23 hours ago
    mega.hurts mega.hurts 16 hours ago Flag

    In his article, "Will Microsoft Kick ARM To The Curb" AE says "Ditching Qualcomm (and, by extension, ARM) would be a very risky move, particularly given how proven a supplier Qualcomm is in smartphones. Further, only Qualcomm's modems at this time support the CDMA standard, which means that if Microsoft were to go all-Intel, Windows Phones would not work on Verizon and Sprint -- two major U.S. carriers."

    The second statement is a gross misrepresentation of reality. In 2015 Intel based phones would support LTE which is the most advanced 4G technology all carriers are moving to and both Verizon and Sprint heavily promote. CDMA is a dying technology far less popular globally than GSM and is used only on the older legacy networks those carriers operate until CDMA is phased out completely.

    And, CDMA was a technology developed by guess who? Qualcomm. It's obvious where AE is getting his speaking points.

  • Reply to

    CNNMONEY: Microsoft Is Killing RT

    by mega.hurts Jul 23, 2014 1:14 PM
    mega.hurts mega.hurts Jul 23, 2014 3:00 PM Flag

    This announcement has very positive implications for Intel. It seems like analysts are either distracted or haven't been able to connect the dots yet to the implications.

    This puts WINTEL as the front runner to deliver on the promise of a unified user experience from smartphones to workstations and everything in between. WINTEL is back in a big way.

  • Reply to

    CNNMONEY: Microsoft Is Killing RT

    by mega.hurts Jul 23, 2014 1:14 PM
    mega.hurts mega.hurts Jul 23, 2014 1:43 PM Flag

    Big implications to this. First, it means ARM's assault in Windows tablets is stopped dead. Secondly, if the future unified version of the Windows is x86 based then what are the implications for Windows-based smartphones? The benefit of a unified OS is lost if Microsoft is having to manage one-offs and separate ecosystems for specific product lines.

    This increases the likelihood of seeing a smartphone that runs real Windows & legacy apps. The portable desktop and one-device-to-carry would be such a killer product.

  • CNN reports Microsoft will combine all its various Windows versions into one unified version next year. They go on to say what everyone already knew, "The biggest failure of Windows RT was that it took away the single best part of Windows - the fact that it can run just about every application ever created."

  • Reply to

    Microsoft to converge on x86 in mobile drop ARM

    by zisdead1 Jul 23, 2014 8:08 AM
    mega.hurts mega.hurts Jul 23, 2014 10:41 AM Flag

    Maybe the folks at ARMH leaned on the British publisher because such an event would have a big impact on ARM's image. In any case, if there's a discussion about Microsoft converging on a CPU architecture there's only one logical choice if MS wants a thriving mobile business.

  • Reply to

    Microsoft to converge on x86 in mobile drop ARM

    by zisdead1 Jul 23, 2014 8:08 AM
    mega.hurts mega.hurts Jul 23, 2014 8:28 AM Flag

    This would be huge, and it makes sense. Look at what happened to Microsoft's RT-based tablets. And one of Microsoft's biggest opportunities ahead is to make smartphones that allow one to run full Windows when docked or used with wearable displays. This is the exclusive domain of x86.

  • mega.hurts mega.hurts Jul 22, 2014 2:37 PM Flag

    This may be the one time I agree with you.

    Of all the good locations Intel could build a multi-billion dollar capital intensive facility Israel is not a wise choice. I don't care how well Israel's Iron Shield works it will never be 100% effective. People intensive activities like R&D and other functions that use ordinary office space and the staff can quickly move when needed does make sense, but not pricey state-of-the-art fabs.

  • According to Fanless Tech all are under 55W TDP, meaning relatively easy passive cooling. Fanless, silent and no moving parts to fail. The best way to go if it meets one's performance requirement.

    Pentium G3250 (2C / 2T), 3.2 GHz, 53W TDP, $64
    Pentium G3250T (2C / 2T), 2.8 GHz, 35W TDP, $64
    Pentium G3450T (2C / 2T), 2.9 GHz, 35W TDP, $75
    Pentium G3460 (2C / 2T), 3.5 GHz, 53W TDP, $86

    Core i3-4160 (2C / 4T), 3.6 GHz, 54W TDP, $117
    Core i3-4160T (2C / 4T), 3.1 GHz, 35W TDP, $117
    Core i3-4360T (2C / 4T), 3.2 GHz, 35W TDP, $138
    Core i3-4370 (2C / 4T), 3.8 GHz, 54W TDP, $149

  • Reply to

    James Covello during Q&A

    by sujit_98 Jul 18, 2014 3:51 PM
    mega.hurts mega.hurts Jul 20, 2014 6:52 PM Flag

    Yes, that was the message he was trying to convey. It's unrealistic to believe everyone that has an older XP system is going to upgrade by Dec. 31. Those upgrades will likely stretch well into 2015.

  • Reply to

    Outrage

    by wallisweaver Jul 19, 2014 5:21 PM
    mega.hurts mega.hurts Jul 20, 2014 9:50 AM Flag

    It is Putin and his recycled cronies from the Soviet era. The proven way for politicians to stay in power is to claim they're protecting the people against external evil. In the absence of real threats one has to create them. Putin controls all the media and he's fed the Russian people a daily diet of death & destruction committed by "western supported fascists" against neighboring ethnic Russian speakers. As far as the average Russian is concerned they are led to believe all of this is a rescue mission.

    Responsibility for the Malaysian Airline disaster certainly lies with Putin and his covert war against Ukraine.

    However one can't help but think it might not ever come to this had Europe joined with the U.S. earlier to be more forceful in implementing sanctions against Putin instead of just treating Putin's aggression as "business as usual" and putting their trade & banking profits ahead of what was right.

    It is truly unfortunate that it takes such a tragedy for leaders of Europe to consider the cost of their inaction.

  • Reply to

    James Covello during Q&A

    by sujit_98 Jul 18, 2014 3:51 PM
    mega.hurts mega.hurts Jul 19, 2014 8:12 AM Flag

    Typical Covello looking for gloom & doom wherever he can find it. It is obvious that under BK Intel prefers conservative guidance. Remember Q1's guidance "flat for the year". Everyone that understands the business knew Wintel was preparing to unleash a wave of innovation to the industry and flat wasn't going to happen. A lot of us commented about this. Then sure enough, upgrades in Q2 and a positive outlook in 2H. Once again Intel is being conservative for Q4 but It is highly unlikely Q4 will be flat.

  • FYI, if you're looking to add Office to a PC Dealnews announced a sale that is selling Office for #$%$ they say it's a reduction of $28 off the normal price. The offer will run until Sept. 28.

  • Reply to

    Putin

    by dewey_duhawk Jul 17, 2014 8:53 PM
    mega.hurts mega.hurts Jul 18, 2014 9:58 AM Flag

    There's no doubt US intelligence has surveillance of the border and has a lot more information than they can reveal. And unquestionably recently gathered intelligence led to new sanctions being imposed.

    In the arena of diplomacy your concept of a neutral observer has merit because truth is not an ally of the wicked. If Putin is not providing or tacitly allowing arms and material to fuel the conflict he has everything to gain and nothing to lose by having this independently confirmed. Perhaps UN observers could perform this role. Now that this conflict has escalated to the international community the UN should propose this and at least provoke an official response from the Kremlin and see who is on the side of truth.

  • Reply to

    Putin

    by dewey_duhawk Jul 17, 2014 8:53 PM
    mega.hurts mega.hurts Jul 18, 2014 9:22 AM Flag

    Ever since Russia invaded Crimea the Kremlin has waged a non-stop 24/7 propaganda war with its State controlled media of hatred against Ukraine and the west. Russian daily news is filled with made-up stories of brutality committed by pro-western Ukrainians against ethnic Russian women and children. The average Russian has been fed the diet of hatred since before the invasion of Crimea and it has never stopped. Even when tensions subsided and Putin's message to the international community appeared peaceful the internal propaganda machine continued with the daily stories of rape, brutality and pro-western forces inflicting pain on the Russian people.

    This is not the message a leader communicates to its people when one wants peace. It is however what a politician does to justify waging a war motivated by ambition.

    The reason the U.S. and Europe imposed new sanctions on Russia, which preceded the Malaysian Airline incident, is because the intelligence shows Putin continues to send arms and personnel to rebels and continues to fuel the war he has always wanted.

  • Reply to

    Cryptocurrency effect

    by organic_crack Jul 17, 2014 6:54 PM
    mega.hurts mega.hurts Jul 17, 2014 7:11 PM Flag

    Absolutely, those Radeon cards appear in huge numbers on Craigslist.

  • mega.hurts mega.hurts Jul 17, 2014 4:32 PM Flag

    You didn't bother to notice that most of these are going to hit Nokia employees?

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