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Apple Inc. Message Board

michalisrael157 380 posts  |  Last Activity: 1 hour 30 minutes ago Member since: Oct 27, 2012
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  • michalisrael157 michalisrael157 Sep 30, 2014 5:01 AM Flag

    What about MSFT GOOG IBM SBUX everyone conduct the same business give it up you basher

  • Reply to

    EU TAX

    by robertel65 Sep 30, 2014 4:30 AM
    michalisrael157 michalisrael157 Sep 30, 2014 4:59 AM Flag

    What happens next?

    It will take months before the European authorities make a ruling. After that, Ireland has 30 days to appeal if the ruling goes against it, and, if its appeal is unsuccessful, it can then take the issue to the European courts. The Irish government has already said it "is confident that there is no breach of state aid rules in this case", and seems to be preparing for a legal battle. So this could take many years to sort out. The EU monitors state aid, such as grants or tax relief, closely. Some state aid is illegal under its rules in cases where it distorts competition.

  • What's happening today?

    The European Commission, the EU's executive arm, has published documents setting out the case against Apple's Irish tax arrangements, and they are critical. This is effectively like setting out the case for the prosecution, and does not mean that Apple will face fines any time soon

    What happens next?

    It will take months before the European authorities make a ruling. After that, Ireland has 30 days to appeal if the ruling goes against it, and, if its appeal is unsuccessful, it can then take the issue to the European courts. The Irish government has already said it "is confident that there is no breach of state aid rules in this case", and seems to be preparing for a legal battle. So this could take many years to sort out. The EU monitors state aid, such as grants or tax relief, closely. Some state aid is illegal under its rules in cases where it distorts competition.

  • It will take months before the European authorities make a ruling. After that, Ireland has 30 days to appeal if the ruling goes against it, and, if its appeal is unsuccessful, it can then take the issue to the European courts. The Irish government has already said it "is confident that there is no breach of state aid rules in this case", and seems to be preparing for a legal battle. So this could take many years to sort out. The EU monitors state aid, such as grants or tax relief, closely. Some state aid is illegal under its rules in cases where it distorts competition.

  • BEIJING (Reuters) - Apple Inc's (AAPL.O) iPhone 6 can now be sold in China, after the company received a license for the device to be used on China's wireless networks, the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology said on its website on Tuesday.

    The iPhone 6 had been released in other countries, including the United States, on September 19 but Apple did not give a release data for China, the world's largest smartphone market.

  • Samsung keeps making fun of Apple’s iPhone 6 Plus “Bendgate” problem, but the company might have issues of its own with the new Galaxy Note 4. The device might not bend, but buyers in South Korea have already noticed a manufacturing issue affecting some of the first Galaxy Note 4 units: Apparently, there’s a gap where there shouldn’t be.

    FROM EARLIER: Galaxy Note 4 sells out in South Korea… all 30,000 of them
    According to South Korean publication IT Today, some Galaxy Note 4 users have noticed a space between the phone’s frame and the display panel, both on the top/bottom or on the sides, posting images with business cards inserted in those gaps. The report also says that two pieces of A4 paper fit inside the gaps.
    It’s not clear how widespread the issue is, considering that Samsung’s South Korean Galaxy Note 4 launch day sales amounted to around 30,000 units, or all available stock Samsung had on hand, but apparently the company is aware of the issue.Considering that Samsung has rushed Galaxy Note 4 launch, at least in its home country, to better counter the iPhone 6 record sales, it’s likely this screen separation issue is a limited manufacturing problem that will be corrected before it becomes Samsung’s “Gapgate,” or something similar, once the handset launches in more markets next month.

  • michalisrael157 by michalisrael157 Sep 29, 2014 2:34 PM Flag

    With good rec we get this b***s

  • September 29, 2014, 12:09 P.M. ET
    .
    Apple: BlueFin Raises iPhone 6 Estimates as Demand Heats Up; Entegris, Dow Beneficiaries
    .
    By Tiernan Ray
    Research Partners analysts John Donovan and Steve Mullane today reiterate a fairly positive view on Apple (AAPL) , writing that reports of iPhone 6 sales in the “initial 7-10 days” are “well ahead of forecasts,” and that there inquiries with supply chain types are picking up ” adjustments in builds/demand for not only CQ3 and CQ4, but also for 1H:15 and the only question is whether or not the supply base can keep pace.”
    “As we have mentioned in our last several AAPL Updates, the demand and build schedules for the iPhone 6/6 Plus were topping 70 million for CQ4,” they observe, “and the adjustments we are tracking would put this number now as much as 10-12% higher at near 80 million.” The authors are modeling 69 million in unit shipments of all iPhones in the December quarter, 57 million the following quarter.

    Incidentally, their Apple model includes an estimate for 1 million in sales in the March quarter of the Apple Watch, though they still refer to it as the “iWatch.” The device, of course, has not yet been put on sale. They model 1.5 million the following quarter, and 10 million units shipped in all of calendar 2015.

    The authors write that a bump up in production of Apple’s “A8” chip at contract chip maker Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing (TSM) for the iPhone 6 has materials suppliers “racing”:

  • Reply to

    Apple (AAPL) price target upgraded to $135

    by mikeranoir Sep 29, 2014 1:35 PM
    michalisrael157 michalisrael157 Sep 29, 2014 1:45 PM Flag

    by whom?

  • Several newspapers seem to have got themselves into a bit of a tizzy about an upcoming announcement from the European Commission over the tax affairs of Apple. Specifically, that the company will be accused of having accepted illegal state aid over its supposed deals with the Irish tax authorities,” Tim Worstall reports for Forbes. “This simply isn’t true and it’s not how public policy on such matters works over here anyway… It absolutely is not a finding of fact nor a finding of error on anyone’s part at all. It’s just a follow up from the June announcement of the investigation, outlining what the investigation is about and why. This makes the Financial Times’ headline a little excitable: ‘Apple hit by Brussels finding over illegal Irish tax deals.'”
    “There is no possibility of a fine upon Apple whatsoever,” Worstall reports. “Again no: there’s simply no finding of fact coming up. This next report is simply a laying out of what the Commission is looking into. And in the case of Apple it’s not even about Irish tax rates, the Double Irish with a Dutch Sandwich (or is it Double Dutch with an Irish?), that mysterious company with no tax domicile or any of those things that get bandied about. It is purely and simply about transfer pricing.”“The major point is that The European Commission is not about to release a report of their findings in this case about Apple’s tax structure or state aid. It’s going to release the report that outlines what it is investigating and why. And even if it does, at some indeterminate point in the future, find illegal state aid there will be no fine imposed upon Apple,” Worstall writes. “As to quite why this story has been so garbled this morning, well, I can only speculate… If I were at the FT or WSJ today I’d be going back to my sources and asking just how their stock position in Apple was looking this morning. Are they short? Got a few short dated put options perhaps? Note, I’m talking about the sources, not the journalists.

  • michalisrael157 by michalisrael157 Sep 29, 2014 10:07 AM Flag

    Several newspapers seem to have got themselves into a bit of a tizzy about an upcoming announcement from the European Commission over the tax affairs of Apple. Specifically, that the company will be accused of having accepted illegal state aid over its supposed deals with the Irish tax authorities,” Tim Worstall reports for Forbes. “This simply isn’t true and it’s not how public policy on such matters works over here anyway… It absolutely is not a finding of fact nor a finding of error on anyone’s part at all. It’s just a follow up from the June announcement of the investigation, outlining what the investigation is about and why. This makes the Financial Times’ headline a little excitable: ‘Apple hit by Brussels finding over illegal Irish tax deals.'”“There is no possibility of a fine upon Apple whatsoever,” Worstall reports. “Again no: there’s simply no finding of fact coming up. This next report is simply a laying out of what the Commission is looking into. And in the case of Apple it’s not even about Irish tax rates, the Double Irish with a Dutch Sandwich (or is it Double Dutch with an Irish?), that mysterious company with no tax domicile or any of those things that get bandied about. It is purely and simply about transfer pricing.”“The major point is that The European Commission is not about to release a report of their findings in this case about Apple’s tax structure or state aid. It’s going to release the report that outlines what it is investigating and why. And even if it does, at some indeterminate point in the future, find illegal state aid there will be no fine imposed upon Apple,” Worstall writes. “As to quite why this story has been so garbled this morning, well, I can only speculate… If I were at the FT or WSJ today I’d be going back to my sources and asking just how their stock position in Apple was looking this morning. Are they short? Got a few short dated put options perhaps? Note, I’m talking about the sources, not the journalists.

  • This is stupid and makes no sense. They cant take money on rules written well after the deal was madw

  • So damn frustrating so many companies does the tax deals yet those impotence go for the cookie jar to take what AAPL earned why work in Europe when you can go after AAPl and take their money

  • Go he"ll WS criminals

  • michalisrael157 michalisrael157 Sep 29, 2014 5:25 AM Flag

    you think hard before writing you insightful posts with a very insightful - g very deep well written - please give some more than a headline and g this looks pathetic

  • michalisrael157 michalisrael157 Sep 29, 2014 4:40 AM Flag

    b***s your imagination running wild. There is no such sum of money. shut up if you so confident at you claim show us the quote stop imagine things and talk to us b***s

  • This is pure hate of AAPL success.

  • Brussels challenges Ireland
    Seven years after Apple's last agreement with Ireland was reached, the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) is now seeking to establish policies among its member states (primarily in Europe and America) that would seek to prevent individual countries from offering tax incentives to companies the way that Ireland, The Netherlands and Luxembourg have."There was no special deal that we cut with Ireland. We simply followed the laws in the country over the 35 years that we have been in Ireland."- Apple CFO Luca Maestri Because the OEDC can't force Ireland's participation, the EC has devised a plan to accuse the country with providing anti-competitive "state aid," a new theory it hopes to use to collect taxes from companies that have organized a legal presence in countries with lower tax rates. The taxation plan hinges on the idea that specific countries have created favorable tax deals with certain companies in way that hurts competition. In addition to Ireland's taxation of Apple, the group is also specifically targeting Dutch taxation agreements with Starbucks and the way Luxembourg taxes Fiat's financial group. Ironically, the new policies alleging "state aid" are being pushed by Germany and France, which worked together to create and subsidize Airbus with below market rate loans that were deemed improper government subsidies by the World Trade Organization after protest from Boeing.The EU is particularly concerned about Apple after seeing its own domestic mobile industry crumble in the wake of the iPhone, particularly Nokia, Ericsson and the fledgeling Symbian Foundation. Following Microsoft's acquisition of Nokia, it laid off thousands of the struggling firm's remaining workers. Apple says its taxation agreements with Ireland do not break any laws. Maestri specifically was cited as stating that "there's never been any special deal, there's never been anything that would be construed as state aid."

  • michalisrael157 michalisrael157 Sep 29, 2014 4:32 AM Flag

    Lies EU accuses Ireland, What at this line you don't understand :

    This week’s expected moves are a formal step aimed at giving interested third parties — such as Apple and Fiat, which aren’t themselves under investigation — a chance to comment, said Martina Maier, an antitrust lawyer with McDermott Will & Emery in Brussels.

    Again which aren't themselves under investigation

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