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Elan Corporation, plc Message Board

nasd_netwatch 31 posts  |  Last Activity: Feb 1, 2013 4:06 PM Member since: Apr 6, 2006
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  • nasd_netwatch nasd_netwatch Feb 1, 2013 4:06 PM Flag

    I watched it.

  • nasd_netwatch nasd_netwatch Feb 1, 2013 3:39 PM Flag

    I wondered why the meeting started late?

  • Some kind of inhaled diabetic agents?

  • nasd_netwatch by nasd_netwatch Jan 17, 2013 3:19 PM Flag

    1/2 normal average

  • nasd_netwatch nasd_netwatch Jan 17, 2013 1:34 PM Flag

    Good Call. 3rd Friday of every month is a big mover
    May start juist before close

  • Reply to

    Ebay Poor business Policies

    by TheFlimFlamMan Oct 20, 2009 8:57 AM
    nasd_netwatch nasd_netwatch Dec 22, 2009 1:06 PM Flag

    Good places to leave real true feedback about Ebay.

  • nasd_netwatch by nasd_netwatch Dec 15, 2009 1:07 PM Flag

    Go to this link! It's the Ebay Discussion board on Feedback.
    http://forums.ebay.com/db2/forum/Feedback/113
    Go to 'Post a new topic"
    Then ask "Why Ebay allows people to sell Positive Feedback on Ebay for as little as 1 cent"
    You can refer to the below link!
    http://shop.ebay.com/i.html?_trkparms=65%253A12%257C66%253A2%257C39%253A1%257C72%253A2464&_nkw=Feedback&_sticky=1&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14&_sop=15&_sc=1

    Then watch and see how fast they will delete your post!

  • nasd_netwatch by nasd_netwatch Nov 4, 2009 6:36 PM Flag

    Had to relist?
    Snap On 10" Adjustable Wrench & 2 Cutters 86BCP 57AHLP

    Is this You?
    http://us.mc593.mail.yahoo.com/mc/welcome?.gx=1&.tm=1257376710&.rand=02cls8t8bo4mu

  • nasd_netwatch nasd_netwatch Nov 4, 2009 6:14 PM Flag

    Guns are very popular.
    Would you give me one?

  • nasd_netwatch nasd_netwatch Nov 4, 2009 5:53 PM Flag

    Do you happen to have any stolen guns?
    I need a throw-down.

  • Reply to

    AMGEN -- SIGNS INTENT TO BUY GNBT --$15

    by matvfreelife Apr 7, 2006 10:07 AM
    nasd_netwatch nasd_netwatch Apr 7, 2006 11:02 AM Flag

    matvfreelife : Your yahoo profile as well as Your IP address have been requested from YAHOO.


    The SEC and NASD have their own Internet surveillance programs. Specifically
    for statements made in chat rooms or on bulletin boards.
    The SEC says it relies on staffers to monitor some chat rooms and bulletin
    board for possible Internet abusess.

    The NASD has spent millions of dollars to create a computerized Internet
    surveillance program called Netwatch.

    Netwatch will try to detect unjustified hyping or bashing of stocks.

    Netwatch is up and running, NASD's computers will continuously scan the
    bulletin boards on the most-popular investment Web sites.
    Bulletin boards lend themselves to this kind of surveillance because the
    postings remain accessible for long periods of time.

    The computer will search the bulletin boards for hyped-up catch phrases such
    as ``easy money,'' ``get rich quick,'' ``can't lose'' or ``double in a
    month,'' regulation chief Walter says.

    If a company that doesn't get mentioned often on the bulletin boards
    suddenly starts showing up frequently, that could serve as a ``red flag,''
    Walter remarks.

    It may simply turn out that the company issued a surprisingly good or bad
    earnings report, or announced a merger. But if there is no obvious cause for
    the proliferation of messages, NASD will try to determine whether someone is
    manipulating the stock.

    CHAT ROOM RULES
    Hyping a stock unjustifiably, or deliberately spreading false information,
    could bring the authorities down on your head.
    Investors cannot:
    -- Disseminate information about a company that you know to be fraudulent.
    Doing so could result in a fine or even imprisonment.
    -- Claim to be someone they aren't. Internet chatters sometimes pretend they
    are company officers or others with inside knowledge. That too is a crime.

  • Reply to

    Buy out? $3.50-$4.15 Anyone see this?

    by watchdog562003 Apr 7, 2006 8:02 AM
    nasd_netwatch nasd_netwatch Apr 7, 2006 8:27 AM Flag

    watchdog562003 this persons IP address is being requested from yahoo.


    The SEC and NASD have their own Internet surveillance programs. Specifically
    for statements made in chat rooms or on bulletin boards.
    The SEC says it relies on staffers to monitor some chat rooms and bulletin
    board for possible Internet abusess.

    The NASD has spent millions of dollars to create a computerized Internet
    surveillance program called Netwatch.

    Netwatch will try to detect unjustified hyping or bashing of stocks.

    Netwatch is up and running, NASD's computers will continuously scan the
    bulletin boards on the most-popular investment Web sites.
    Bulletin boards lend themselves to this kind of surveillance because the
    postings remain accessible for long periods of time.

    The computer will search the bulletin boards for hyped-up catch phrases such
    as ``easy money,'' ``get rich quick,'' ``can't lose'' or ``double in a
    month,'' regulation chief Walter says.

    If a company that doesn't get mentioned often on the bulletin boards
    suddenly starts showing up frequently, that could serve as a ``red flag,''
    Walter remarks.

    It may simply turn out that the company issued a surprisingly good or bad
    earnings report, or announced a merger. But if there is no obvious cause for
    the proliferation of messages, NASD will try to determine whether someone is
    manipulating the stock.

    CHAT ROOM RULES
    Hyping a stock unjustifiably, or deliberately spreading false information,
    could bring the authorities down on your head.
    Investors cannot:
    -- Disseminate information about a company that you know to be fraudulent.
    Doing so could result in a fine or even imprisonment.
    -- Claim to be someone they aren't. Internet chatters sometimes pretend they
    are company officers or others with inside knowledge. That too is a crime.

  • Reply to

    GNBT news is imminent,

    by tees89 Apr 6, 2006 11:30 AM
    nasd_netwatch nasd_netwatch Apr 6, 2006 11:41 AM Flag

    tees89: 271 posts in past 3 weeks. Check your posts and read below

    The SEC and NASD have their own Internet surveillance programs. A
    pecifically for statements they made in chat rooms or on bulletin boards.

    The New York Stock Exchange declined to say what, if anything, it does to
    combat Internet investment fraud.

    The SEC says it relies staffers to monitor some chat rooms and bulletin
    board for possible Internet abusess.

    The NASD has spent millions of dollars to create a computerized Internet
    surveillance program called Netwatch.

    Netwatch will try to detect unjustified hyping or bashing of stocks.

    Netwatch is up and running, NASD's computers will continuously scan the
    bulletin boards on the most-popular investment Web sites. Bulletin boards
    lend themselves to this kind of surveillance because the postings remain
    accessible for long periods of time.

    The computer will search the bulletin boards for hyped-up catch phrases such
    as ``easy money,'' ``get rich quick,'' ``can't lose'' or ``double in a
    month,'' regulation chief Walter says.

    If a company that doesn't get mentioned often on the bulletin boards
    suddenly starts showing up frequently, that could serve as a ``red flag,''
    Walter remarks.

    It may simply turn out that the company issued a surprisingly good or bad
    earnings report, or announced a merger. But if there is no obvious cause for
    the proliferation of messages, NASD will try to determine whether someone is
    manipulating the stock.

    CHAT ROOM RULES
    Hyping a stock unjustifiably, or deliberately
    spreading false information, could bring the authorities down on your head.

    Investors cannot:

    -- Disseminate information about a company that you know to be fraudulent.
    Doing so could result in a fine or even imprisonment.

    -- Claim to be someone they aren't. Internet chatters sometimes pretend they
    are company officers or others with inside knowledge. That too is a crime.


    NASD Watch

  • Reply to

    GNBT news is imminent,

    by tees89 Apr 6, 2006 11:30 AM
    nasd_netwatch nasd_netwatch Apr 6, 2006 11:36 AM Flag

    The SEC and NASD have their own Internet surveillance programs. A
    pecifically for statements they made in chat rooms or on bulletin boards.

    The New York Stock Exchange declined to say what, if anything, it does to
    combat Internet investment fraud.

    The SEC says it relies staffers to monitor some chat rooms and bulletin
    board for possible Internet abusess.

    The NASD has spent millions of dollars to create a computerized Internet
    surveillance program called Netwatch.

    Netwatch will try to detect unjustified hyping or bashing of stocks.

    Netwatch is up and running, NASD's computers will continuously scan the
    bulletin boards on the most-popular investment Web sites. Bulletin boards
    lend themselves to this kind of surveillance because the postings remain
    accessible for long periods of time.

    The computer will search the bulletin boards for hyped-up catch phrases such
    as ``easy money,'' ``get rich quick,'' ``can't lose'' or ``double in a
    month,'' regulation chief Walter says.

    If a company that doesn't get mentioned often on the bulletin boards
    suddenly starts showing up frequently, that could serve as a ``red flag,''
    Walter remarks.

    It may simply turn out that the company issued a surprisingly good or bad
    earnings report, or announced a merger. But if there is no obvious cause for
    the proliferation of messages, NASD will try to determine whether someone is
    manipulating the stock.

    CHAT ROOM RULES
    Hyping a stock unjustifiably, or deliberately
    spreading false information, could bring the authorities down on your head.

    Investors cannot:

    -- Disseminate information about a company that you know to be fraudulent.
    Doing so could result in a fine or even imprisonment.

    -- Claim to be someone they aren't. Internet chatters sometimes pretend they
    are company officers or others with inside knowledge. That too is a crime.


    NASD Watch

  • Reply to

    THIS IS STTK BOARD F OFF GNBT=POS

    by lizasmoviesandcds Apr 6, 2006 11:24 AM
    nasd_netwatch nasd_netwatch Apr 6, 2006 11:35 AM Flag

    lizasmoviesandcds
    The SEC and NASD have their own Internet surveillance programs. A
    pecifically for statements they made in chat rooms or on bulletin boards.

    The New York Stock Exchange declined to say what, if anything, it does to
    combat Internet investment fraud.

    The SEC says it relies staffers to monitor some chat rooms and bulletin
    board for possible Internet abusess.

    The NASD has spent millions of dollars to create a computerized Internet
    surveillance program called Netwatch.

    Netwatch will try to detect unjustified hyping or bashing of stocks.

    Netwatch is up and running, NASD's computers will continuously scan the
    bulletin boards on the most-popular investment Web sites. Bulletin boards
    lend themselves to this kind of surveillance because the postings remain
    accessible for long periods of time.

    The computer will search the bulletin boards for hyped-up catch phrases such
    as ``easy money,'' ``get rich quick,'' ``can't lose'' or ``double in a
    month,'' regulation chief Walter says.

    If a company that doesn't get mentioned often on the bulletin boards
    suddenly starts showing up frequently, that could serve as a ``red flag,''
    Walter remarks.

    It may simply turn out that the company issued a surprisingly good or bad
    earnings report, or announced a merger. But if there is no obvious cause for
    the proliferation of messages, NASD will try to determine whether someone is
    manipulating the stock.

    CHAT ROOM RULES
    Hyping a stock unjustifiably, or deliberately
    spreading false information, could bring the authorities down on your head.

    Investors cannot:

    -- Disseminate information about a company that you know to be fraudulent.
    Doing so could result in a fine or even imprisonment.

    -- Claim to be someone they aren't. Internet chatters sometimes pretend they
    are company officers or others with inside knowledge. That too is a crime.


    NASD Watch

  • Check your posts: Warning

    The SEC and NASD have their own Internet surveillance programs. A
    pecifically for statements they made in chat rooms or on bulletin boards.

    The New York Stock Exchange declined to say what, if anything, it does to
    combat Internet investment fraud.

    The SEC says it relies staffers to monitor some chat rooms and bulletin
    board for possible Internet abusess.

    The NASD has spent millions of dollars to create a computerized Internet
    surveillance program called Netwatch.

    Netwatch will try to detect unjustified hyping or bashing of stocks.

    Netwatch is up and running, NASD's computers will continuously scan the
    bulletin boards on the most-popular investment Web sites. Bulletin boards
    lend themselves to this kind of surveillance because the postings remain
    accessible for long periods of time.

    The computer will search the bulletin boards for hyped-up catch phrases such
    as ``easy money,'' ``get rich quick,'' ``can't lose'' or ``double in a
    month,'' regulation chief Walter says.

    If a company that doesn't get mentioned often on the bulletin boards
    suddenly starts showing up frequently, that could serve as a ``red flag,''
    Walter remarks.

    It may simply turn out that the company issued a surprisingly good or bad
    earnings report, or announced a merger. But if there is no obvious cause for
    the proliferation of messages, NASD will try to determine whether someone is
    manipulating the stock.

    CHAT ROOM RULES
    Hyping a stock unjustifiably, or deliberately
    spreading false information, could bring the authorities down on your head.

    Investors cannot:

    -- Disseminate information about a company that you know to be fraudulent.
    Doing so could result in a fine or even imprisonment.

    -- Claim to be someone they aren't. Internet chatters sometimes pretend they
    are company officers or others with inside knowledge. That too is a crime.

    NASD Watch:

  • Reply to

    $$CHMD $$ CHMD $$ CHMD $$

    by nvaxtrader Apr 6, 2006 10:45 AM
    nasd_netwatch nasd_netwatch Apr 6, 2006 10:52 AM Flag

    The SEC and NASD have their own Internet surveillance programs. A
    pecifically for statements they made in chat rooms or on bulletin boards.

    The New York Stock Exchange declined to say what, if anything, it does to
    combat Internet investment fraud.

    The SEC says it relies staffers to monitor some chat rooms and bulletin
    board for possible Internet abusess.

    The NASD has spent millions of dollars to create a computerized Internet
    surveillance program called Netwatch.

    Netwatch will try to detect unjustified hyping or bashing of stocks.

    Netwatch is up and running, NASD's computers will continuously scan the
    bulletin boards on the most-popular investment Web sites. Bulletin boards
    lend themselves to this kind of surveillance because the postings remain
    accessible for long periods of time.

    The computer will search the bulletin boards for hyped-up catch phrases such
    as ``easy money,'' ``get rich quick,'' ``can't lose'' or ``double in a
    month,'' regulation chief Walter says.

    If a company that doesn't get mentioned often on the bulletin boards
    suddenly starts showing up frequently, that could serve as a ``red flag,''
    Walter remarks.

    It may simply turn out that the company issued a surprisingly good or bad
    earnings report, or announced a merger. But if there is no obvious cause for
    the proliferation of messages, NASD will try to determine whether someone is
    manipulating the stock.

    CHAT ROOM RULES
    Hyping a stock unjustifiably, or deliberately
    spreading false information, could bring the authorities down on your head.

    Investors cannot:

    -- Disseminate information about a company that you know to be fraudulent.
    Doing so could result in a fine or even imprisonment.

    -- Claim to be someone they aren't. Internet chatters sometimes pretend they
    are company officers or others with inside knowledge. That too is a crime.

  • Reply to

    buy STTK and AIDO in unbelievable price

    by lkdhakkhin Apr 6, 2006 10:42 AM
    nasd_netwatch nasd_netwatch Apr 6, 2006 10:51 AM Flag

    lkdhakkhin: check all of your previous posts.
    Warning

    The SEC and NASD have their own Internet surveillance programs. A
    pecifically for statements they made in chat rooms or on bulletin boards.

    The New York Stock Exchange declined to say what, if anything, it does to
    combat Internet investment fraud.

    The SEC says it relies staffers to monitor some chat rooms and bulletin
    board for possible Internet abusess.

    The NASD has spent millions of dollars to create a computerized Internet
    surveillance program called Netwatch.

    Netwatch will try to detect unjustified hyping or bashing of stocks.

    Netwatch is up and running, NASD's computers will continuously scan the
    bulletin boards on the most-popular investment Web sites. Bulletin boards
    lend themselves to this kind of surveillance because the postings remain
    accessible for long periods of time.

    The computer will search the bulletin boards for hyped-up catch phrases such
    as ``easy money,'' ``get rich quick,'' ``can't lose'' or ``double in a
    month,'' regulation chief Walter says.

    If a company that doesn't get mentioned often on the bulletin boards
    suddenly starts showing up frequently, that could serve as a ``red flag,''
    Walter remarks.

    It may simply turn out that the company issued a surprisingly good or bad
    earnings report, or announced a merger. But if there is no obvious cause for
    the proliferation of messages, NASD will try to determine whether someone is
    manipulating the stock.

    CHAT ROOM RULES
    Hyping a stock unjustifiably, or deliberately
    spreading false information, could bring the authorities down on your head.

    Investors cannot:

    -- Disseminate information about a company that you know to be fraudulent.
    Doing so could result in a fine or even imprisonment.

    -- Claim to be someone they aren't. Internet chatters sometimes pretend they
    are company officers or others with inside knowledge. That too is a crime.

    NASD Watch

  • Reply to

    WRNBFFT LIKES STTK JUST REMEMBER

    by handsumfkr Apr 6, 2006 10:31 AM
    nasd_netwatch nasd_netwatch Apr 6, 2006 10:33 AM Flag

    The SEC and NASD have their own Internet surveillance programs. A
    pecifically for statements they made in chat rooms or on bulletin boards.

    The New York Stock Exchange declined to say what, if anything, it does to
    combat Internet investment fraud.

    The SEC says it relies staffers to monitor some chat rooms and bulletin
    board for possible Internet abusess.

    The NASD has spent millions of dollars to create a computerized Internet
    surveillance program called Netwatch.

    Netwatch will try to detect unjustified hyping or bashing of stocks.

    Netwatch is up and running, NASD's computers will continuously scan the
    bulletin boards on the most-popular investment Web sites. Bulletin boards
    lend themselves to this kind of surveillance because the postings remain
    accessible for long periods of time.

    The computer will search the bulletin boards for hyped-up catch phrases such
    as ``easy money,'' ``get rich quick,'' ``can't lose'' or ``double in a
    month,'' regulation chief Walter says.

    If a company that doesn't get mentioned often on the bulletin boards
    suddenly starts showing up frequently, that could serve as a ``red flag,''
    Walter remarks.

    It may simply turn out that the company issued a surprisingly good or bad
    earnings report, or announced a merger. But if there is no obvious cause for
    the proliferation of messages, NASD will try to determine whether someone is
    manipulating the stock.

    CHAT ROOM RULES
    Hyping a stock unjustifiably, or deliberately
    spreading false information, could bring the authorities down on your head.

    Investors cannot:

    -- Disseminate information about a company that you know to be fraudulent.
    Doing so could result in a fine or even imprisonment.

    -- Claim to be someone they aren't. Internet chatters sometimes pretend they
    are company officers or others with inside knowledge. That too is a crime.

  • Reply to

    $3.00 COMING and then POW To The Moon

    by tobasco_popcycle Apr 6, 2006 10:26 AM
    nasd_netwatch nasd_netwatch Apr 6, 2006 10:29 AM Flag

    tobasco_popcycle check your posts:

    The SEC and NASD have their own Internet surveillance programs. A
    pecifically for statements they made in chat rooms or on bulletin boards.

    The New York Stock Exchange declined to say what, if anything, it does to
    combat Internet investment fraud.

    The SEC says it relies staffers to monitor some chat rooms and bulletin
    board for possible Internet abusess.

    The NASD has spent millions of dollars to create a computerized Internet
    surveillance program called Netwatch.

    Netwatch will try to detect unjustified hyping or bashing of stocks.

    Netwatch is up and running, NASD's computers will continuously scan the
    bulletin boards on the most-popular investment Web sites. Bulletin boards
    lend themselves to this kind of surveillance because the postings remain
    accessible for long periods of time.

    The computer will search the bulletin boards for hyped-up catch phrases such
    as ``easy money,'' ``get rich quick,'' ``can't lose'' or ``double in a
    month,'' regulation chief Walter says.

    If a company that doesn't get mentioned often on the bulletin boards
    suddenly starts showing up frequently, that could serve as a ``red flag,''
    Walter remarks.

    It may simply turn out that the company issued a surprisingly good or bad
    earnings report, or announced a merger. But if there is no obvious cause for
    the proliferation of messages, NASD will try to determine whether someone is
    manipulating the stock.

    CHAT ROOM RULES
    Hyping a stock unjustifiably, or deliberately
    spreading false information, could bring the authorities down on your head.

    Investors cannot:

    -- Disseminate information about a company that you know to be fraudulent.
    Doing so could result in a fine or even imprisonment.

    -- Claim to be someone they aren't. Internet chatters sometimes pretend they
    are company officers or others with inside knowledge. That too is a crime.

    NASD Watch

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