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Starbucks Corporation Message Board

news_to_use 53 posts  |  Last Activity: Jul 8, 2014 11:18 PM Member since: Jan 26, 1999
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  • news_to_use news_to_use Jul 8, 2014 11:18 PM Flag

    I think California today will settle for $8-10 million and the other states will each be around $2-3 million. Total setlement amount should be around $50-$60 million. However I put a much larger number in my calculations because my estimates are very conservative.

  • In July 2007, the California Attorney General announced that, without any findings or admissions of wrongdoing, CCi agreed to pay $6.5 million to settle allegations that the school engaged in false advertising.[40] The amount included $5.8 million in restitution to students as well as $500,000 in civil damages and $200,000 in investigation costs.[40][41] CCi issued a statement saying: "We disagree with the Attorney General's conclusions, but we are pleased to have this matter behind us. The agreement is not evidence of wrongdoing, and the company specifically denied any wrongdoing as part of the settlement. We are fully committed to providing quality education and job placement services for students and to being in compliance with state law and regulation."

  • news_to_use news_to_use Jul 8, 2014 8:59 PM Flag

    Longtimefollower- It is you who is in dreamland but about to become nightmare. Do you understand how hard it is to track down 150,000 students that ED wanted info on? In a large poll by public colleges there was only 27% response rate. They have assigned an additional 100 people to track students down and have alreay supplied most of the info, thus the agreement. Once they no longer need advance on 21 day hold, ED stops monitor. When Heald sells which could be any day, you will wake up to nightmare, shorty.

  • news_to_use news_to_use Jul 8, 2014 8:59 PM Flag

    Longtimefollower- It is you who is in dreamland but about to become nightmare. Do you understand how hard it is to track down 150,000 students that ED wanted info on? In a large poll by public colleges there was only 27% response rate. They have assigned an additional 100 people to track students down and have alreay supplied most of the info, thus the agreement. Once they no longer need advance on 21 day hold, ED stops monitor. When Heald sells which could be any day, you will wake up to nightmare, shorty.

  • news_to_use news_to_use Jul 8, 2014 8:53 PM Flag

    It is you who is in dreamland but about to become nightmare. Do you understand how hard it is to track down 150,000 students that ED wanted info on? In a large poll by public colleges there was only 27% response rate. They have assigned an additional 100 people to track students down and have alreay supplied most of the info, thus the agreement. Once they no longer need advance on 21 day hold, ED stops monitor. When Heald sells which could be any day, you will wake up to nightmare, shorty.

  • news_to_use news_to_use Jul 8, 2014 8:53 PM Flag

    It is you who is in dreamland but about to become nightmare. Do you understand how hard it is to track down 150,000 students that ED wanted info on? In a large poll by public colleges there was only 27% response rate. They have assigned an additional 100 people to track students down and have alreay supplied most of the info, thus the agreement. Once they no longer need advance on 21 day hold, ED stops monitor. When Heald sells which could be any day, you will wake up to nightmare, shorty.

  • news_to_use news_to_use Jul 8, 2014 6:36 PM Flag

    After the news today, the 12% teach-out discount is being reduced to 5%. The schools, after all discounting and contingencies and settlements, and net of all debt, are now worth $379.45 million or $4.27 a share.

  • So reduce my 12% discount to only 5%, meaning that the company is worth 7.95% more than I stated yesterday. I want to thank everyone who sold their shares to me today. Thanks again!

  • news_to_use news_to_use Jul 7, 2014 2:07 PM Flag

    You're a dumbell. Do you know what kind of debt they had. Retailers are an entirely different business - their vendors shut off their credit and they can't operate.

  • news_to_use news_to_use Jul 7, 2014 1:37 PM Flag

    Learn to read. It's there, but actually most schools are sold with debt if they go for less than 1 times sales, so I probably should not have calculated it - I'm just being extremely conservative.

  • news_to_use news_to_use Jul 7, 2014 1:27 PM Flag

    As I said, XIDEQ is a good example but entirely different industry. They arctually declared bankruptcy and had plants shut down by the Feds and States because of air and water pollution.. Now they also have announced accounting problems. I bought them at 12 cents after they declared bankruptcy and sold 2 months later for 46 cents.

  • news_to_use news_to_use Jul 7, 2014 12:54 PM Flag

    I think that most of the selling today has been shorting, which is very good for us longs. They are the fuel that will push us way up - it's just a matter of time. I've been doing this since 1987 and I know exactly what is coming.

  • news_to_use news_to_use Jul 7, 2014 12:48 PM Flag

    You might be interested to know I bought XIDEQ at 12 cents a share into bankruptcy in July last year and sold at 4 times that price in September. It had EPA violations and shutting down plants and much worse than here and declared BK. Don't let anyone tell you that assets have no value.

  • This is according to the Wall Street Journal this weekend, July 5-6 2014.

  • If you do the math with revenue of $1.48 Billion and discount it by 14%(reduced enrollment) and then discount that by 12%(teach out schools) you get $1.12 Billion. Discount that further by 15%(additional distress factor) and you get $950 million. At a sale of .7 times revenues(extremely cheap), you get $665 million sales price. Subtract $140 million in debt plus subtract $200 million in settlements and contingencies, you get $325 million. That is 16. times what COCO is trading for here or $3.66 a share! They scared you people with negative articles and words but the 8-K looks pretty boilerplate and the agreement is very good for company and cash flow. Nasdaq delisting notice is meaningless. Lots of shorts are now trapped and this could explode up at any moment. Thanks for the shares!

  • Go to goolje and enter "Bill Clinton Pitches KKR Backed College Chain Amid Controversy Internationally, salespeople like these have helped Laureate Education Inc. become a for-profit higher education juggernaut. Laureate, which was spawned from tutoring chain Sylvan Learning Systems Inc. in 2004, now owns 75 schools in 30 countries.

    Largest Company

    It has 800,000 students, up from 243,000 seven years ago, making it America’s largest for-profit college company by enrollment. Since going private in 2007, Laureate’s annual revenue has more than tripled to $4 billion.

    Though Laureate isn’t well-known in the U.S., it employs one of the country’s most recognizable figures: former President Bill Clinton. In 2010, the company hired Clinton to serve as its honorary chancellor. In this paid position, Clinton has trekked to Laureate’s campuses in countries such as Malaysia, Peru and Spain, making more than a dozen appearances on its behalf.

    Laureate is backed by several of the biggest names in finance, including Henry Kravis, George Soros, Steve Cohen and Paul Allen. When Laureate’s founder and chief executive officer, Doug Becker, convinced these investors’ firms to take his company private in a deal worth $3.8 billion, Kravis’s firm, KKR & Co., took a $487.5 million stake.

    By 2010, according to a KKR memo to investors, its investment had increased in value to $710.8 million.

  • and funds are being advanced. These will be sold as fully functioning schools with students and faculty and cash flow, which makes them much more valuable. The company is worth over $1 a share and we should see a big squeeze on Monday.

  • A new report announced today by the American Institutes for Research (AIR) and Nexus Research and Policy Center (Nexus) claims to be the first to determine whether states and taxpayers are getting a fair return for their higher-ed tax dollars.

    The main findings:

    Taxpayer subsidies that cover the operating costs of most colleges and universities ranges from around $8,000 to more than $100,000 for each bachelor’s degree awarded, with most public institutions averaging more than $60,000 per degree. (The financial figures reflect the amount of money colleges and universities receive in direct government support and tax breaks. They do not include loans and grants provided by state and federal governments to help students meet tuition costs.)
    Among elite private universities, like Harvard and Yale, the average taxpayer subsidy is $13,000 per student per year, while the annual subsidy at the most selective public universities, like the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and the University of California, Los Angeles is more than $23,000 per student annually.

    Taxpayers benefit from the higher income taxes paid on the higher salaries earned by college graduates, ranging from $50,000 in additional taxes paid over the work life of a graduate from a less selective not-for-profit institution to almost $150,000 in additional income taxes paid over the work life of a graduate from the most selective not-for-profits.
    Taxpayers subsidize the education that students receive in most colleges and universities. Each student earning a bachelor’s degree at a public college or university accounts for more than $60,000 in subsidies to the institutions.
    Among open admission and less selective schools, taxpayers – on average – paid almost $8,000 per student at not-for-profit institutions.
    The subsidies increase dramatically among the most selective institutions, from almost $60,000 in not-for-profit institutions to nearly $110,000 in the most selective public institutions.
    Less selective private institutions, both not-for-profit and for-profit, generate “a much better bang for the taxpayer buck.” For-profit colleges, for instance, give taxpayers a net gain of more than $6,000 per bachelor’s degree. For the same degree, equally selective, private not-for-profit schools post a net taxpayer cost of $8,000; however, comparable state schools are at a net cost of more than $60,000 per degree.
    Its conclusions:

    Given the financial return to graduates for each completed bachelor’s degree, the high cost of dropouts, and the high dropout rates in less selective public colleges and universities, the states and the Federal Government must focus their resources and policies on increasing retention and degree completion at less selective institutions.
    Given that the lowest levels of taxpayer support go to the institutions that enroll the highest percentage of students from low-income families, nontraditional students, and minority students, the states and the Federal Government must reverse their policies and focus their support for completion on the neediest students.
    Given that the research on cost shows that not-forprofit and for-profit institutions are the best deal for taxpayers, to lower cost and increase capacity, the states and the Federal Government should support high-quality, nontraditional providers.
    Given that state and federal policy discussions concerning how and who to fund must be informed by reliable data drawn from institutions across all types of control and levels of selectivity, the states and the Federal Government should move to make such data available, and the latter should move to scrap the antiquated and inadequate federal Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) in favor of a data system based on student-level data that can measure the success of the growing number of “nontraditional” college students, who now make up the majority of postsecondary students in the country.
    Read the full report here.

  • Reply to

    BK off the table

    by alfredo1969 Jul 2, 2014 4:30 PM
    news_to_use news_to_use Jul 2, 2014 5:28 PM Flag

    No kidding! Obviously they would not be going back to lenders and renegotiating covenants and getting bridge loans if they were going bankrupt. Duh

  • news_to_use news_to_use Jul 1, 2014 12:39 PM Flag

    I'm not posting anything for #$%$ like you. I just take your money.

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