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Trius Therapeutics, Inc. (TSRX) Message Board

posgost67 31 posts  |  Last Activity: Dec 3, 2014 11:49 AM Member since: May 30, 2013
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  • Reply to

    Gerald: RS and uplist now

    by scappy25 Dec 2, 2014 3:56 PM
    posgost67 posgost67 Dec 3, 2014 11:49 AM Flag

    This is a very good point actually. Every company over the past two years that has received Lincoln Park funny money has either not increased in value since the financing was announced or has seen a reduction (in some cases up to 50% of the value of the stock). I think Lincoln Park holds the share price down so that they can maximize their profits at the expense of the company they are financing.

  • Reply to

    Posgost

    by riskreturn168 Nov 21, 2014 2:54 PM
    posgost67 posgost67 Dec 1, 2014 12:40 PM Flag

    Oh great. Has INO decided to use IL-12 with the HPV vaccine? I thought they wanted to use IL-33. The one for cervical dysplasia has no additional adjuvant (besides the electroporation). The one for cervical cancer that they were going to test out, I didn't know if they decided on the IL-12 or the IL-33. IL-12 would be the way to go IMO, so that is a good decision on their part.

  • Reply to

    Posgost

    by riskreturn168 Nov 21, 2014 2:54 PM
    posgost67 posgost67 Dec 1, 2014 12:38 PM Flag

    Nope. No facebook account

  • Reply to

    Posgost: Phenoguard?

    by riskreturn168 Nov 27, 2014 4:54 PM
    posgost67 posgost67 Dec 1, 2014 12:06 AM Flag

    Gene therapy would be the only way (currently) to get MANF to be produced inside cells without introducing a toxin.

  • Reply to

    Posgost: Phenoguard?

    by riskreturn168 Nov 27, 2014 4:54 PM
    posgost67 posgost67 Dec 1, 2014 12:04 AM Flag

    Yes. There are many things that can induce MANF to be expressed inside cells. They are all toxins that paralyze the cell's endoplasmic reticulum, or stop a cell from being able to make proteins, or activators of the glucose deprivation pathway, though.

    If you take away an essential amino acid, and the cell can't make all the required proteins, MANF will be produced intracellularly as part of the ER stress pathway.

    Similarly if a cell can't undergo the normal process of respiration because glucose stores are too low, they will activate the glucose/serum starvation pathways which are very similar to the ER stress pathways.

    This is not an answer to healing disease though.

  • Reply to

    Posgost

    by riskreturn168 Nov 21, 2014 2:54 PM
    posgost67 posgost67 Nov 30, 2014 11:55 PM Flag

    I thought it was prostate cancer. Anyway, Roche has their hands on so many pots, that this was one they could easily let go of.

    ONCS finally starting to look like the better play out of INO and ONCS. Not really a "cancer vaccine." More an adjuvant. The trial looking at PD-1 inhibition and immunopulse has the big wigs involved (including UCSF and Merck). The two plays that are similar are ZIOP and ONCS, but ZIOP is partnered with Epizyme. ONCS with Merck... I think I would go with ONCS here...

  • Reply to

    Posgost

    by riskreturn168 Nov 21, 2014 2:54 PM
    posgost67 posgost67 Nov 27, 2014 3:04 AM Flag

    Nope. Workin like a dog. The man keeping me down... Just writing grants (groveling for money) to stay afloat.

    There really wasn't anything new here at AMBS over that time. Seems like they like to put out 4-5 PRs at a time, then a lull.

    The new skin is interesting. The issue is those studies are expensive. They will burn through Lincoln Park money quickly just with eltoprazine. Or permaderm. Or MANF. But if just one of them hits, the company would be set.

    I think eltoprazine is the easiest bet now to go forward to partnering. The trials for permaderm were so fraught with abuse of the system, that its gonna take a lot to get the FDA on board. Maybe they know something. We shall see.

    Happy Thanksgiving all.

  • Reply to

    Key Points from today's GREAT NEWS!

    by zarconimous Nov 25, 2014 12:01 PM
    posgost67 posgost67 Nov 25, 2014 7:28 PM Flag

    The key is this: "statistically significant."

    That means there were at least 3 mice per group. You need to have 3 to have statistical significance.

    By the way. It wasn't rats, it was mice. Read the PR.

    I do agree, though, that they need more information in the PR. After the pump over the summer that wasn't substantiated, they should have learned their lesson. I do believe not releasing the actual data is holding the big boys back (Unless they are sharing data behind closed doors. And don't take this as they are doing something wrong. They issued the PR. They let the world know they have statistically significant data. They don't have to share the numbers with everybody if they don't want to.

  • Reply to

    Posgost...

    by nelitopais1 Nov 25, 2014 4:33 PM
    posgost67 posgost67 Nov 25, 2014 7:21 PM Flag

    Thanks Manolo for the offer. No need. I have a job.

  • Reply to

    Posgost

    by riskreturn168 Nov 21, 2014 2:54 PM
    posgost67 posgost67 Nov 25, 2014 3:32 PM Flag

    Just had time to quickly scan his paper. His small molecule screen is based on inhibition of caspase cleavage (a marker that apoptosis may occur) in neurons following endoplasmic reticulum stress. So he found certain molecules may prevent ER stress induced cell death. Most of those molecules have been found by others before, including dantrolene.

    Dantrolene works in vivo in rats to prevent traumatic brain injury induced nerve apoptosis because it is a calcium channel blocker. Shifts in calcium occur very early after injury in cells and mediates, in part, the cell death. People are also looking at calcium channel blockers for Alzheimer's disease.

    He used a simple approach, that resulted in a simple outcome. All of those inhibitors that he used make sense as they have been previously shown to inhibit apoptosis, except the Cox-2 inhibitor (NS-398). In some models COX-2 inhibition (like by celebrex) can make apoptosis worse, and in others it can make it better.

    From my experience, its not that simple.

    The other thing about why he is looking at these inhibitors (likely) is that the NIH has a big initiative for giving grants for drugs that have been "retired" and repurposing them/giving them new uses. They have a large funding pool available for this kind of research. Just my 2 cents.

  • Reply to

    Posgost

    by riskreturn168 Nov 21, 2014 2:54 PM
    posgost67 posgost67 Nov 24, 2014 5:52 PM Flag

    I bought MANF made in CHO cells, which should have the correct post-translational modifications. I spoke to the company, and they said they test and guarantee all of their recombinant proteins for the function listed.

    The function listed was the ability to stimulate rat neural cell proliferation. So I figured if a human protein can make rat cells proliferate (meaning it possesses neurotrophic/cytokine properties), it should be able to function in human macrophages (if the macrophages express the receptor for it). Well I used 0.1, 1, and 10 x, and 100x the concentration that was previously shown to work in heart cells, brain cells, and retinal cells.

    Either I bought a dud from the company (possible) or the macrophages don't express the receptor for it (possible) or MANF doesn't possess anti-inflammatory effects (possible).

    I could try to purify the receptor, but since it didn't do what I was hoping it would, I figured, there is no point in looking at it any more. Plus I ran out of the protein after trying it out twice. Not worth me putting any more lab money into it.

    This does not impact my opinion of MANF or Amarantus at all. It just didn't work in my model. I was hopeful because of the effects in type I diabetes (an immune disease), but no dice...

  • Reply to

    Posgost

    by riskreturn168 Nov 21, 2014 2:54 PM
    posgost67 posgost67 Nov 24, 2014 5:27 PM Flag

    Sorry I have been really busy.

    I actually agree with zoomboom on this. You should understand anything you invest in.

    For scasperavich, check my post history (some prob a year old) I have numerous posts on why I think AMBS could be worth a speculative investment. It has nothing to do with LymPro. Its all MANF, and a little eltoprazine sprinkled in there.

  • Reply to

    Posgost

    by riskreturn168 Nov 21, 2014 2:54 PM
    posgost67 posgost67 Nov 21, 2014 9:49 PM Flag

    Now back to the first sentence of the above paragraph. So in the GDNF MANF article that I wrote a summary about last week, basically it proved that different neurons respond to different neurotrophic factors. In the substantia nigra, MANF/GDNF clearly play roles that can result in synergy, whereas CDNF clearly plays a role in the striatum. In the eye, MANF seems to be able to fix the retinal cells. My guess is that all of these cells express the receptor for MANF, and those are the indications that should be targeted for treatment with recombinant MANF. Eyes/retina, and substantia nigra based disease. So I do believe that MANF administration may help retinitis pigmentosa in wolfram's disease, or any other disease that patients develop retinitis pigmentosa in.
    I have tried pretreating mouse macrophages (immune cells) with (murine) MANF prior to stimulating them with an immune activator (lipopolysaccharide). It did not prevent activation of the immune system. By itself, MANF also didn't cause any discernable changes in a limited panel of genes that I tested compared to vehicle control. That just tells me that macrophages probably don't express the receptor for MANF. I was hoping that it would have some anti-inflammatory effect. But it did not in that particular model.

    I think someone needs to find the receptor for extracellular MANF so that real progress can be made to identify how extracellular MANF works.

  • Reply to

    Posgost

    by riskreturn168 Nov 21, 2014 2:54 PM
    posgost67 posgost67 Nov 21, 2014 9:43 PM Flag

    Fibonacci has deleted every post over a couple of weeks old, so you can no longer see his 100 other predictions that were completely wrong. His Spec/Sens predictions never made any sense, and he doesn't even understand there is only two inducible genes in LymPro that can possibly go up in lympro (he said 8 in his last tweet), so when I tweeted him that, he deleted that "prediction" tweet as well. That's all I'm going to say about that.

    As far as the small molecules, I have to see what the small molecules are and then I can assess whether they may work.

    As far as the efficacy of MANF, it all depends on which neurons/cells are responsive to MANF. Wolframin is a related gene/protein (to MANF- they are both involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways) mutated in Wolfram's disease that plays a role in diabetes. Both MANF and WFS1 knockout mice display diabetes and death of pancreatic beta cells. What that tells me, is that pancreatic beta cells are exquisitely sensitive to endoplasmic reticulum stress. In Wolfram's disease, will MANF be able to fix the beta cells that are dying because they don't express wolframin? My opinion, no. It doesn't make sense. Remember, intracellular MANF protects cells from ER stress. Extracellular MANF acts as a neurotrophic factor (hence its name) mainly acting like a cytokine and causing cell signaling. So will adding extracellular MANF to patients who don't make intracellular wolframin fix the dying beta cells that lack wolframin? My opinion, no. Now if there were MANF deficient humans, extracellular MANF still may be able to fix the beta cells. I think you still need to get the beta cells to make it intracellularly, to block the ER stress pathway from being activated and killing those cells.

  • Reply to

    Cash position

    by embe08 Nov 21, 2014 10:47 AM
    posgost67 posgost67 Nov 21, 2014 1:10 PM Flag

    Its Phil. from the YMB

  • Reply to

    Fibonacci?

    by riskreturn168 Nov 21, 2014 10:30 AM
    posgost67 posgost67 Nov 21, 2014 12:25 PM Flag

    KITE catalysts, CAR-T cells

    JUNO IPO should be big when it hits. Also CAR-T, furthest along (along with NVS).
    JCAR015, now in a Phase I clinical trial, has seen a "91% complete remission rate in 22 evaluable adult patients with relapsed/refractory B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, or r/r ALL, as of the most recent data cutoff date of July 1, 2014. Historical complete remission rates without JCAR015 in a similar population are less than 10%." Juno plans to start a Phase II trial in mid-2015 exploring JCAR015 in adult r/r ALL that could support accelerated U.S. regulatory approval.
    JCAR017 has achieved an 83% complete remission rate in 6 evaluable patients with pediatric r/r ALL as of August 1. "We plan to continue the ongoing Phase I/II trial in pediatric r/r ALL in 2015. Based upon data to date, we also plan to initiate a multicenter Phase I trial exploring JCAR017 in relapsed/refractory B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, or r/r NHL, in 2015, with the potential to advance to a registration trial in 2016 that may support accelerated U.S. regulatory approval."

  • Reply to

    Fibonacci?

    by riskreturn168 Nov 21, 2014 10:30 AM
    posgost67 posgost67 Nov 21, 2014 12:21 PM Flag

    DDD has some catalysts coming up, and is near 18 month low, may bounce to that level again (30-31) should bounce to the low 40s

  • Reply to

    Fibonacci?

    by riskreturn168 Nov 21, 2014 10:30 AM
    posgost67 posgost67 Nov 21, 2014 12:18 PM Flag

    NVAX and CCXI got orphan drug designation. NVAX already up. Flu season coming. I see NVAX and BCRX going up if its a bad flu season. Watching those.

  • Reply to

    Fibonacci?

    by riskreturn168 Nov 21, 2014 10:30 AM
    posgost67 posgost67 Nov 21, 2014 12:17 PM Flag

    Also of note. Good luck with the kitchen/dishwasher. That sucks. I just moved, so haven't been so active. Moving tough with a 2 and a 4 year old.

    PHMD potential bottom play. Had a nice bump yesterday. It will settle in the 2.30s- 2.40s today before next leg up. I am hoping to get more at 2.20ish...

  • Reply to

    Fibonacci?

    by riskreturn168 Nov 21, 2014 10:30 AM
    posgost67 posgost67 Nov 21, 2014 12:15 PM Flag

    Awesome. I'll email you next time I see something good. PED finally looks like a bottom. Tricked me with that morning bump to $1.00, then fade back to .67... I think .60 is the bottom there. Company way undervalued. LNCGY, a pick of a friend of mine. Another energy pick in Australia. Huge potential.

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