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questinator 330 posts  |  Last Activity: 5 hours ago Member since: Jan 9, 2011
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  • Reply to

    The impact of flexible manufacturing at Ford

    by questinator Apr 15, 2015 1:17 PM
    questinator questinator 5 hours ago Flag

    LOL, 3 people do not approve of Ford saving money this way! That is just too hysterical.

    Questinator

  • Reply to

    The impact of flexible manufacturing at Ford

    by questinator Apr 15, 2015 1:17 PM
    questinator questinator 5 hours ago Flag

    As stated, you did not see the low profile tires on the car? Do you know what low profile means? It means that the sidewall of the tire is shorter from rim to tread than traditionally used in the past. It is easily seen. One reason for this is to improve handling as the shorter sidewall allows less flexing of the tire when cornering.

    Did you complain about the color when you got home too? How much did you look into it before buying it? It costs more than $20,000 and a reasonable person usually considers all aspect of the item before making such a purchase.

    Questinator

  • questinator questinator Apr 16, 2015 11:00 PM Flag

    Awe, come on arnold.......you are all up to speed on this.....why are you ignoring it??

    Questinator

  • Reply to

    GM Message Board removed from Yahoo

    by gskowalski Apr 13, 2015 1:56 PM
    questinator questinator Apr 16, 2015 10:59 PM Flag

    Just type GM in the search bar above and you will find the GM board in the drop down menu. It will take you right there.

    Questinator

  • Reply to

    I like the UAW

    by threeplyheaven Apr 12, 2015 6:55 PM
    questinator questinator Apr 16, 2015 10:36 PM Flag

    You haven't used this alias since you made this post. Must have gone back into hibernation.

    Questinator

  • questinator questinator Apr 16, 2015 10:34 PM Flag

    So what do you mean by all this here? GM sales will increase???

    Questinator

  • questinator questinator Apr 16, 2015 10:29 PM Flag

    So, in stating all that......are you recommending buying......or selling?

    Questinator

  • questinator questinator Apr 16, 2015 10:23 PM Flag

    That's why unions are vilified, and the notion of being paid really well, with great benefits, is also a point used to make people jealous of those workers. Instead of learning to aspire to a good income the younger generations are taught that people making a good wage should be pulled down. When did our country become this way?

    Questinator

  • questinator questinator Apr 16, 2015 10:20 PM Flag

    I learned about Costo's wage structure while watching a documentary on the company. I had no idea they paid so well ($22/hr). People work harder, and with more detail, because they are being paid well. As lovelincolns said, they are also very loyal, and that's how the company keeps an experienced work force and saves costs on constantly training, like many other companies in their industry. That loyalty also increases efficiency.

    This was the business model that made this country great. Greatness is not so popular anymore though.

    Questinator

  • Reply to

    gm

    by blaand Apr 16, 2015 12:29 AM
    questinator questinator Apr 16, 2015 10:10 PM Flag

    I've seen a number of people state the board was down a number of times. I don't know how those people are trying to get there, but I am usually going there from here, and that's how I get there.

    Questinator

  • questinator questinator Apr 16, 2015 10:02 PM Flag

    American Icon by Bryce Hoffman is also a must read, about the way Ford turned around from certain liquidation.

    Questinator

  • Reply to

    The impact of flexible manufacturing at Ford

    by questinator Apr 15, 2015 1:17 PM
    questinator questinator Apr 16, 2015 9:57 PM Flag

    Thanks Kurtz.

    It is fascinating stuff, especially after it has been done the same way for decades.

    Contrary to what some people here may believe, there are plenty of workers who are ecstatic that some of the body shop jobs have been automated. A lot of the jobs in the body shop eat up bodies. I don't mean people get sucked into the tooling or anything like that, I mean the actual process of assembling certain parts requires quite a physical demand on the body that the body is not made to tolerate over years of repeating the process. Everyone is happy to see the body eater jobs go. Until now it was something that had to be done by someone. At least nobody will have to be eaten up anymore.

    The plant I work in is unique in the fact that we do not build vehicles that change often enough that warrants a flexible shop. We built the Econoline here since about 1974. The first time the body shop was retooled due to a redesign wasn't until 1991. The body shop that was built in 1991 built the van for the rest of it's life, which was until June of last year. Parts of that shop are still building the cab for the Econoline cut-a-ways. About 6 - 7 million vans came out of that tooling. Typical body shop tooling was engineered to last 6 - 7 years whether it was used that long or not.

    Now we just tooled for the new F-650/F-750 medium duty trucks. These things are so huge the process is entirely different than anything we've done before which includes the Nissan Quest/Mercury Villager, Escape, and Mariner.

    Questinator

  • Reply to

    The impact of flexible manufacturing at Ford

    by questinator Apr 15, 2015 1:17 PM
    questinator questinator Apr 16, 2015 9:39 PM Flag

    Retooling in flexible body shops now mean reprogramming robots that have replaced traditional assembly fixtures. Instead of scrapping fixtures that held panels together to be welded (or now riveted) and replacing them with totally new fixtures, robots with clamping end effectors are just reprogrammed. There may be some new net surfaces (the actual surfaces of the clamps that contact the sheet metal) but that is infinitely cheaper than building a whole new fixture ( precision machined mounting plate, stanchions, clamps, net surfaces, pneumatics, wipers, proximity switches, etc.). This reduces downtime and costs.

    Questinator

  • Reply to

    The impact of flexible manufacturing at Ford

    by questinator Apr 15, 2015 1:17 PM
    questinator questinator Apr 16, 2015 12:44 PM Flag

    The reason I posted this is to show where real cost savings comes from, part of the other 93% of the costs of building a car.

    Questinator

  • Reply to

    So much for the 'beer can F-150' claims

    by flythunderbird Apr 16, 2015 8:14 AM
    questinator questinator Apr 16, 2015 12:39 PM Flag

    Thanks to 31 new safety-related innovations developed by the Ford truck team, the 2015 F-150 SuperCrew has earned a five-star Overall Vehicle Score in the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s New Car Assessment Program.

    “The five-star safety rating is a terrific example of One Ford collaboration and innovation,” said Raj Nair, Ford group vice president, Global Product Development. “Our truck team worked together for years to deliver this accomplishment, using an unprecedented combination of advanced materials throughout the all-new F-150. The 2015 model is engineered to be the safest F-150 ever, which matters to customers who depend on this truck to not only get the job done, but also get them safely home.”

    A cross-functional group comprised of Ford truck product development veterans and researchers worked to precisely optimize vehicle weight savings and manufacturing design to deliver improved durability, capability, fuel economy and crashworthiness. The team created and patented new structures, materials and joining methods that were tested virtually with supercomputer simulations, then retested in Ford’s advanced laboratories to engineer the safest F-150 ever.

    Engineers added an extra crossmember and increased the use of high-strength steel to improve stiffness, durability and safety – while also helping reduce the frame’s weight by up to 60 pounds.

    “The team had to invent new ways to manage crash energy, because advanced materials like high-strength steel behave differently,” said Matt Niesluchowski, Ford truck safety manager. “We found that changing certain shapes led to a weight reduction, while also improving crash performance.”

    The truck’s cab features hydroformed roof rails that constitute a cage-like structure around the doors, extruded roof bows to provide lateral strength across the top of the cab, and extruded rocker rails near the bottom to reinforce lower body strength.

    Questinator

  • Reply to

    gm

    by blaand Apr 16, 2015 12:29 AM
    questinator questinator Apr 16, 2015 12:34 PM Flag

    I have never had a problem getting to the GM board while people have been claiming it is shutdown. At the top of this page below FORD MOTOR CO. MESSAGE BOARD is a search bar. To the left of the bar it says "Get Message Board for:" You can just type "gm" in there and the board will show up in the drop down menu of choices.

    Questinator

  • Reply to

    Like I stated yesterday

    by jasonargonaut32 Apr 16, 2015 11:05 AM
    questinator questinator Apr 16, 2015 12:30 PM Flag

    The 20`5 F-150's that are being sold are the high end, highest profit margin vehicles.

    The sales Ford is losing are less profitable fleet sales, though Ford usually does well in fleet sales due to volume. I suspect Ford chose to retool the Dearborn plant first because that is where the higher priced trucks are made, and thus after the decreased availability of trucks due to the retooling Ford will be able to recoup profit soonest by selling the high end trucks first.

    Questinator

  • Reply to

    The impact of flexible manufacturing at Ford

    by questinator Apr 15, 2015 1:17 PM
    questinator questinator Apr 15, 2015 1:19 PM Flag

    The third area is changeover flexibility, which is the ability to run a current model and new model at the same time in an integrated build.

    “In the past when we would introduce a new product we would close the plant for a short period of time, reconfigure the plant and buy all-new equipment. Now we don’t have to do that,” said Hettle. “The Lincoln MKC at our Louisville Assembly Plant is a great example. We continued to build the Ford Escape the entire time we were launching the MKC. So we didn’t incur any production downtime at all.”

    Hettle says Ford’s success with flexible manufacturing is due largely to the talent of the workforce.

    “The training and capability of our people is so important to be competitive,” he said. “There is a lot of technology. Our production workforce has to run the equipment and our skilled trades have to maintain and take care of it. They all do a wonderful job.”
    _________________

    This article is from the at.ford website.

    Questinator

  • In today’s ultra-competitive vehicle market, it’s essential for automakers to be able to respond quickly to changing customer needs. Flexible manufacturing enables Ford to do that.

    “We have built flexibility in place with our tools so that as we change from one vehicle to the next generation vehicle the majority of our tooling can be carried over, and it represents an important cost savings,” said (John) Fleming (executive vice president, Global Manufacturing and Labor Affairs).

    Bruce Hettle, vice president, North America Manufacturing, says the investments Ford has made in flexible manufacturing in North America to make plants more efficient, safe and flexible are significant and have positioned the company to compete with the best.

    “Our level of penetration with flexible manufacturing and the body shops that we’ve put in place make us an industry leader,” he said.

    Hettle says there are three areas of flexibility in Ford manufacturing plants.

    Platform flexibility is having plants that can run multiple products and platforms at a given site.

    “A great example of that is our Flat Rock Assembly Plant where we build the Ford Fusion and the Ford Mustang – two very different vehicles from a design standpoint – down the same line through the same body shop,” said Hettle.

    “Mix flexibility allows us to meet market demand by giving us the opportunity to vary the percentage of a given vehicle we make each day in the production schedule quickly and in real time,” said Hettle. “An example is at the Chicago Assembly Plant where we build the Ford Explorer, Ford Taurus, Ford Interceptor and Lincoln MKS. Explorer is a really important product for us so we set the plant up to have the capability of running 100 percent Explorers, but we have the ability to vary the mix depending on market requirements.”

    More....

  • questinator questinator Apr 15, 2015 1:12 PM Flag

    As I said in a previous a post, once people get past the paradigm of what a van is supposed to look like, I believe they really like it.

    Questinator

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