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SandRidge Energy, Inc. Message Board

rainbow3100 91 posts  |  Last Activity: Nov 13, 2014 6:37 PM Member since: Jul 1, 2010
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  • Reply to

    neiljneil

    by juan_ton_amigo Nov 13, 2014 2:14 PM
    rainbow3100 rainbow3100 Nov 13, 2014 6:37 PM Flag

    Juanton, you never did answer my question whether you prefer being called an Hispanic or a Mexican? Or are you just a Bigot using a Spanish alias? I asked my Barber the same question (Hispanic vs. Mexican) he is from Mexico and came to the USA in 1974. I'll tell you his answer later.

    In case you are wondering: yo hablo Espanol, no perfecto, pero puedo communicar bastante bien. I'm not a bigot, but am wondering about you Juan Ton, so please answer the question.

  • rainbow3100 by rainbow3100 Nov 13, 2014 5:08 PM Flag

    The Siberian and North American Snow Cover Area for this early in the winter is setting new records and suggests that North America, Europe and Asia may suffer through another brutal winter.

    The Arctic is also the coldest it's been for this time of year in over a decade, which also tends to show this winter could be one for the record books...

    A 35-yr record sized Antarctic Ice Extent was set a few months ago, the complete lack of global warming trend for 18+ years, etc., all seem to indicate that the CAGW hypothesis is NOT the "settled science" it's claimed to be.

    The weakest solar cycle since 1906 peaked earlier this year so it's all downhill from here until 2020. The next solar cycle should start from 2020 and is expected by many astrophysicists to be the weakest since 1715...

    The Pacific started its 30-yr cool cycle in 2005, and the Atlantic will enter its 30-yr cool cycle from around 2020... All these climatic factors tend to show that global temps should fall and that's what's happening....

    We're currently in a weak El Nino cycle but when it switches to a cold La Nina cycle in late 2015/early 2016, global temps could really start getting quite a bit cooler.

  • Reply to

    NG to Coal

    by rainbow3100 Nov 11, 2014 10:05 PM
    rainbow3100 rainbow3100 Nov 12, 2014 5:55 PM Flag

    Juan Ton:

    Funny you should call me "Bow" and wonder about how good of a hunter I am. We all know I'm pretty good at NG, but here are a few hunting statistics for you - just what I've killed with a Bow:

    1 Rattlesnake
    1 Duck
    6 Feral Hogs
    50 plus Wild Turkeys
    100 plus Whitetail Deer
    Numerous Cottontails, Squirrels, Racoons and a Rat.

    All of the above just with a Bow and Arrow - I shoot plenty of birds with a shotgun as well, and killed tons of Deer and Turkey with a rifle and shotgun before I got serious about Bow Hunting.

    Come on down to my Texas Ranch and I'll shoot an Apple off the Top of your head. I rarely miss so you have little to worry about.

    If Coal gets scarce, and winter gets cold, we will see some nice price spikes this winter. The fun really starts in 2016/2017, as that is when the demand drivers should finally outpace supply.

    Interesting that the Siberian Snow extent was even greater this year at the end of October than it was last year. Some think that it's an excellent forecaster of cold winters in the USA. It was very high last year and we got a cold winter.

  • rainbow3100 by rainbow3100 Nov 11, 2014 10:05 PM Flag

    From a Barclays article:

    "Additionally, coal stocks at power plants are low," they wrote. They noted "63 percent (of) plants have less than 60 days of burn left and 23 percent of those have less than 30 days of burn versus 42 percent and 13 percent a year prior respectively."
    They also point out that two-thirds of coal travels by rail, and rail congestion has been a factor keeping stocks low, with weekly coal car loads near six-year lows.

    Looks good for NG, switching may not be as easy this year as in the past.

    Additionally, quite a few Coal Plants are retiring earlier than expected.

  • rainbow3100 rainbow3100 Nov 11, 2014 5:55 PM Flag

    SD has 30 years to deliver 3.5tcf of CO2 to the OXY plant. They are a little over 2 years into the contract and have delivered around .5tcf (much of this booked prior to Century Plant being completed thru Older Plants and SD got a credit for it).

    There are annual penalties of .25mcf for under delivery and a huge .70mcf penalty in 2042 for any outstanding amount that has not been delivered. If SD is 2.0tcf shy in 2042, they cough up 1.4 Billion.

    The main concern as I see it is not whether the annual penalties get booked 4th quarter vs each quarter, but is if the SEC is going to make SD escrow some funds against the 2042 final delivery amount. With 28 years left on the contract, SD needs to deliver around 107bcf per year, and they are not delivering even a fraction of that amount at present. If SD is required to escrow or do some sort of provision against this shortfall, it could raise the penalties to close to over 75 million per year.

    The Pinon needs to be flowing at 450mmcfd (Gross with 65% CO2) to provide adequate flow to the Century Plant. That will take at least 20 Rigs running for quite some time. We need to see much higher NG prices for that to happen.

  • Reply to

    Pow! Watford looks like a genius

    by qe2infinity Nov 7, 2014 12:54 PM
    rainbow3100 rainbow3100 Nov 9, 2014 11:29 PM Flag

    Elvis is a friend of mine and I communicate with him off of boards. He is a very successful Oil guy that sold his company for more than you could even dream of. You would have no knowledge of him if you did not hang out on the SD board under your Cleint9 alias. To my knowledge, Elvis is not invested in UPL and has never posted on this board.

    I don't know Neil or communicate with him off of the boards. But I like the guy on the boards - he adds value with his comments and insight.

    So what is your deal Juanton? Many of us provide insights as to company and industry trends and back them up with facts. Check out my recent posts on the SD board about the Century Plant problems - I'm not always "pumping" and layout the facts as I see them.

    You don't add much, to any discussions, but at least you realize that I write well, and am a NG Guru. Very few follow NG to the extent that I do, and say what you may, I haven't been too far off the mark, especially since the double bottom call at 2.20.

    Are you just jealous and angry at people that are smarter and more successful than you?

    Once again, do you prefer to be called a Mexican or an Hispanic, or are you just a bigot playing name games? Don't belittle the Hispanic population with your Juanton Amigo stuff unless you are truly a part of the culture. You certainly aren't an Amigo of mine, and likely 95% plus of this MB doesn't consider you their Amigo.

  • Reply to

    Pow! Watford looks like a genius

    by qe2infinity Nov 7, 2014 12:54 PM
    rainbow3100 rainbow3100 Nov 9, 2014 9:05 PM Flag

    Thanks for the compliment Juan Ton. As a widely self acclaimed NG Guru, I hit it on the nose last year when NG prices where depressed and said we would see 5 maybe 6, and low and behold that's what happened. I also said 4 would be the floor, that was a pretty good call but it did drop below.

    I also called a double bottom in NG at around 2.20, it tanked a bit below that, but it was a decent call.

    I'm not as bullish for 2015 unless we get a real cold winter. But I'm real Bullish 2016 forward. I doubt NG goes down much below 4 for any extended period of time in the next year and am looking forward to 5.50 plus in 2016 forward.

    I'll clue you in on Coal Plant retirements and renewables when I have time if you continue to be respectful of my "guru" status. Hint, renewables are strong in 2015, then drop off and 2016 is very good for NG taking up demand.

    I might be off a bit on NG, but haven't missed by much so far.

    Layoff my buddy Neil, he contributes a bunch on many different boards and doesn't change his name to Cleint9 like you do on the SD board. Why don't you just post under the same name? And are you a Mexican, if not why do you have such a screen name. I'm a Texan and like Mexicans/Hispanics, know lots of them and am pretty fluent in Spanish.

    Do you prefer to be called an Hispanic or a Mexican?

  • rainbow3100 rainbow3100 Nov 9, 2014 7:49 PM Flag

    It's simply a function of the Rate of Return that you get on drilling a well. The MidCon provides much better returns at present than the WTO. If you get 350 boe IP vs 150 boe, it's not that difficult to calculate. Plus the boe is weighted much more towards the liquids side in the MidCon. The WTO wells can be drilled cheaper and don't decline as fast , but they don't stack up to liquids. We will have to see if the SEC clocks SD with having to escrow or make some sort of accounting adjustment for the 2042 accumulated deficit. Bennett said that was not the case on the CC, but who knows. The Century Plant penalties aren't going away anytime soon unless a deal gets worked out with OXY.

    OXY can boost production in their Permian Oil wells by 50,000 boed if they had all the CO2 flowing full blast into their wells. Its a huge benefit to them and that's why they funded over 1 Billion for the Century Plant. Evidently they are #$%$ off and don't want to throw any more money towards SD and are fine with the penalties, but CO2 enhanced production is by far more profitable than drilling new wells.

  • rainbow3100 rainbow3100 Nov 9, 2014 6:28 PM Flag

    Marcellus and Eagle Ford are driving NG production upwards. Bakken a bit as well (but not much). Eagle Ford by most accounts will peak in the next couple of years. Marcellus maybe continues until 2020. The rest of the fields are in decline.

    Only the sweetest of spots are getting drilled in all of the plays. Marcellus is not economic at below 5 NG for the vast majority of its acreage. I'm thinking Marcellus production peaks by 2017 (if NG prices don't rise) that's somewhat against the prevailing thought, though if you look at Legacy Declines against new well production you can make an argument for it.

    Utica is a Big Wild Card - if it ramps up hard, it will depress NG prices forward.

    SD can make money at 5 NG in the WTO, though it may not stack up against 90 plus Oil. The WTO wells have EUR's in the 6 to 8 Bcf area, but are heavily weighted with CO2 (65% or so) They can be drilled at around 1.8 Million per well recovering around 2.5bcf of methane. At 4mcf that only pays back 10 Million Gross - Royalties and taxes have to get netted back, so maybe around 7 Million over the life of the well. There are production costs as well as G&A, interest etc. The WTO does not stack up to Liquids Plays, maybe breaks even at 4mcf.

    These wells are vertical for the most part and have a shallow decline of around 30% the first year. Much better or worse than horizontals depending on how you look at it. Getting lots of production up front (horizontal plays) allows you to recoup well investment much faster and is better for the PV 10 calculation, but your revenues decline dramatically in a year or two. Vertical wells in the WTO don't payoff as quickly but provide a much better income stream after the first couple of years and don't deplete the reservoir as quickly.

    SD also has some really good high methane fields on the East and South sides of the Pinon, but has yet to develop these fields. They won't help much with the CO2 penalties, but could prove to be economically competitive with the MidCon if Oil prices tank hard. The East side of the WTO looks to be particularly good.

    I've been thru two Oil Busts in TX. The one in the late 1980's bankrupted most of the small caps. It wasn't just limited to the Oil Industry: Real Estate and Banking got bankrupted as well - it wasn't fun, it temporarily crippled me financially. Saudis have deep pockets, they can survive a few years of depressed oil prices and may choose to continue to produce at high levels and shut down the shale plays in the USA and prevent or curtail startup elsewhere. The rest of OPEC can't afford to do so and may over produce if prices start to slide to make up for lost revenue which would accelerate declining prices.

    We could see much lower Oil prices as a result thereof. I am not predicting this, but its a possibility, and it's happened before.

    While Oil prices may decline, this is not necessarily going to impact NG in the same way, especially in the USA. If production winds down in the Eagle Ford, associated gas from this field will radically decline and its unlikely that Marcellus will be able to offset this decline without higher NG prices.

    We will see NG prices in the 5.50 to 6.00 area by 2017. There are huge demand drivers coming up in the next few years that will drive prices significantly higher. At present, nobody wants to buy high priced futures, the market is scared that prices won't rise (on the spot market by that time) and nobody is Bullish out to the future. This will cause some incredible spikes in the not too distant future.

    Looking at 2015, I'm not quite as bullish on NG, Marcellus production continues to rise, and it's going to take another cold winter to get us a boost. This latest cold pop coming from the Superstorm in Alaska is getting things off to an early start for NG, but will it be a harbinger of things to come this winter? Let's hope so. By 2016, things should be substantially different with supply decreasing or at least not increasing at previous rates and much more demand is coming into play.

    JMHO - do your own DD.

  • rainbow3100 rainbow3100 Nov 9, 2014 12:11 PM Flag

    The Century Plant contract calls for both annual and a final penalty in 2042 for lack of delivery.

    SD pays .25mcf for annual under delivery penalties and .70mcf in 2042 for cumulative under delivery. The contract calls for a total of 3.5tcf of CO2 to be delivered. Approximately 3.0tcf still needs to be delivered potentially resulting in a final balloon payment in excess of 2.0 Billion dollars.

    Current penalties (per annum) are in excess of 30 Million and there are additional pipeline penalties to PGC.

    Let's hope the SEC doesn't require some sort of annual accrual against the 2042 balloon penalty. If it does, it will destroy earnings.

    The 2013 10K (annual report) and various 10Q's discuss this in detail.

  • Reply to

    Cold Weather Blast On The Way...

    by hogcreekranger1 Nov 5, 2014 3:32 PM
    rainbow3100 rainbow3100 Nov 6, 2014 8:30 PM Flag

    Feel free to cut and paste my posts to whatever board you like. They aren't copyrighted. I'm heavy in RRC, SWN, and UPL. All of which will benefit when Marcellus prices converge with HH.

    Very nice and early surprise with NG running the way it has been lately in view of record production. I'm very bullish NG 2016 forward, but am totally surprised with this recent run before winter even gets started. Let's hope it holds and accelerates.

  • Reply to

    Cold Weather Blast On The Way...

    by hogcreekranger1 Nov 5, 2014 3:32 PM
    rainbow3100 rainbow3100 Nov 6, 2014 6:54 PM Flag

    Hog,

    When I referred to supply being way up, I meant production numbers, not storage numbers. Production is way up and more pipeline hookups are on the way in the Marcellus.

    Mexico is taking some of this pressure off with the Sierrita Pipeline (200mmcfd) which just came online and is fully subscribed. And there is a big pipeline coming online from the Eagle Ford to the tune of 2.0bcfd from the Texas side leading into Mexico by EOY or first Qtr. I don't think Mexico will take all of that capacity anytime soon, but its going to be a huge factor by 2016.

    Marcellus pipelines should be good for producers in this field, particularly as they get hooked up going south into the gulf for LNG Exports. The disparity between Marcellus and HH pricing should narrow or converge. This could effect SD, but should mainly benefit Marcellus/Utica producers - still aways off. I'm figuring 2016/2017 is when NG finally takes off.

  • Reply to

    Cold Weather Blast On The Way...

    by hogcreekranger1 Nov 5, 2014 3:32 PM
    rainbow3100 rainbow3100 Nov 6, 2014 6:08 PM Flag

    Some observers argue that the amount of snow covering Eurasia in October could indicate how much icy air will blow down from the Arctic to North America in December and January. [Frigid Winter Warning Signals Could Heat Up Natural Gas ETFs]

    As of the end of October, about 14.1 million square kilometers of snow covered Siberia, the second most on record going back to 1967, reports Brian Sullivan for Bloomberg. In comparison, about 12.9 million square kilometers covered Eurasia for the same month last year.

    Judah Cohen, director of seasonal forecasting at Atmospheric and Environmental Research, argues that the greater snow coverage signals a higher chance of another Arctic Vortex conditions to sweep into more temperate regions of North America, similar to what happened last winter.

    “A rapid advance of Eurasian snow cover during the month of October favors that the upcoming winter will be cold across the Northern Hemisphere,” Cohen said in the Bloomberg article. “This past October the signal was quite robust.”

    The energy market has taken notice, anticipating colder weather ahead and raising prices on heating fuel, despite a large supply injection. According to Citigroup, the number of heating degree days, or how often consumers need to use gas heat, will likely be 20% higher this November than the previous month’s 10-year average. [Natty's Plunge Hits This ETF]

    Last week, natgas producers added 91 billion cubic feet to stockpiles, or 5 bcf more than anticipated and more than double the typical addition for this time of the year, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

    Shorts are getting squeezed. Let's hope we have a real cold winter. Otherwise Bulls will get hammered in 2015 - supply is way up. By 2016 Industrial, Manufacturing, LNG and Mexico Exports, as well as Transport demand should overtake supply.

    I'm a bit surprised by this early NG rally, but am loving it.

  • rainbow3100 rainbow3100 Nov 6, 2014 4:15 PM Flag

    You can find info on the Century Plant Contract penalties in some of the old 10Q reports. Basically its a 30 year contract that provides for penalties if a certain amount of CO2 is not delivered each year and a very large penalty at the end of the contract for any accrued undelivered amounts.

    There are also separate penalties Pinon Gathering Company which is a 20 year contract. It is a pipeline contract. I estimate current penalties for the two contracts to be well in excess of $30 Million per annum.

    OXY spent over 1 Billion on the Century Plant and SD hasn't drilled a well in the WTO for over 4 years. The penalties aren't going to go away. The plant has the capacity to treat somewhere between 600 to 800mmcfd and production is currently a very small fraction of that. SD would need at least 20 rigs in this play to get volumes cranked up and that is not going to happen unless NG goes up the 5.50 area and can be hedged out for several years at that level.

    We have had some threads on this topic in the past. You might have to go back a year or two to find them.

    Nice to see NG running up in spite of record production. Weather forecast for November looks like it's going to be much colder than normal. Let's hope NG continues to run and that the Saudis don't kill oil prices.

  • rainbow3100 by rainbow3100 Oct 29, 2014 9:55 PM Flag

    In its 2004 AEO Reference Case, the EIA forecast oil prices to be $23.61 per barrel in 2010 and $26.72 per barrel in 2025. In reality, oil prices in 2010 were three times higher than forecasted and persistently remained over $100 a barrel until just a few months ago.

    More recently with shale gas and tight oil, the EIA has had to significantly correct for previously optimistic estimates. In 2011, the EIA was forced to cut its estimates of technically recoverable shale gas in the Marcellus Play by 80% and Poland by 99%, after the United States Geological Survey came out with much lower numbers. At the time of the Marcellus downgrade, an EIA spokesperson said, “We consider the USGS to be the experts in this matter… They’re geologists, we’re not. We’re going to be taking this number and using it in our model.”

    Earlier this year, the EIA slashed its estimate of technically recoverable tight oil from California’s Monterey Formation—which just three years previously had been estimated to hold two-thirds of all U.S. tight oil—by a whopping 96%. The author of the original EIA estimate, INTEK Inc., admitted that it had been derived from oil company presentations rather than hard data. The downgrade occurred a few months after Post Carbon Institute published an analysis that showed—using actual production data from the Monterey Formation—that the federal government’s estimates were wildly optimistic. But during the three years when the EIA’s initial estimates were rolling off the tongue of every oil and gas industry lobbyist in California, policy discussions in the Golden State were dominated by discussions of how to use the wealth from this soon-to-come bonanza.

    Post Carbon Institute is once again calling out the EIA's rosey forecasts. PCI sees NG production peaking sometime in 2016/2017 whereas the EIA sees robust growth at low prices thru 2040.

    NG won't do much this year. Injections are robust and going up against a very cold winter last year. I expect the deficit to move to a surplus sometime in December and to build thereafter unless we get a really cold winter. And 2015 doesn't look much better. But 2016 forward looks to be gold.

  • Reply to

    Drilling Deeper

    by rainbow3100 Oct 27, 2014 1:59 PM
    rainbow3100 rainbow3100 Oct 29, 2014 4:13 PM Flag

    EIA Forecast Record:

    In its 2004 AEO Reference Case, the EIA forecast oil prices to be $23.61 per barrel in 2010 and $26.72 per barrel in 2025. In reality, oil prices in 2010 were three times higher than forecasted and persistently remained over $100 a barrel until just a few months ago.

    More recently with shale gas and tight oil, the EIA has had to significantly correct for previously optimistic estimates. In 2011, the EIA was forced to cut its estimates of technically recoverable shale gas in the Marcellus Play by 80% and Poland by 99%, after the United States Geological Survey came out with much lower numbers. At the time of the Marcellus downgrade, an EIA spokesperson said, “We consider the USGS to be the experts in this matter… They’re geologists, we’re not. We’re going to be taking this number and using it in our model.”

    Earlier this year, the EIA slashed its estimate of technically recoverable tight oil from California’s Monterey Formation—which just three years previously had been estimated to hold two-thirds of all U.S. tight oil—by a whopping 96%. The author of the original EIA estimate, INTEK Inc., admitted that it had been derived from oil company presentations rather than hard data. The downgrade occurred a few months after Post Carbon Institute published an analysis that showed—using actual production data from the Monterey Formation—that the federal government’s estimates were wildly optimistic. But during the three years when the EIA’s initial estimates were rolling off the tongue of every oil and gas industry lobbyist in California, policy discussions in the Golden State were dominated by discussions of how to use the wealth from this soon-to-come bonanza.

    Post Carbon Institute is once again calling out the EIA's rosey forecasts. PCI sees NG production peaking sometime in 2016/2017 whereas the EIA sees robust growth at low prices thru 2040. Maybe Juanton can give us some good guidance - he loves the EIA, Obama, and believes everything our government tells us.

  • Reply to

    Drilling Deeper

    by rainbow3100 Oct 27, 2014 1:59 PM
    rainbow3100 rainbow3100 Oct 27, 2014 9:22 PM Flag

    Juanton, I had a good time Sand Skiing out at my ranch - got a chuckle out of your post on that. Watch and learn about NG supply. It's still going up, but the EIA has totally blown the call on Long Term supply. I'm figuring Marcellus peaks sometime in 2016, maybe Utica comes on strong to continue supply growth, but doubtful that supply will outstrip demand 2017 forward.

    Industry and manufacturing has and is investing 10's of Billions into plants that will consume massive amounts of NG. The Mexico exports will ramp up hard in the next few years, and then the Big Cahuna of LNG exports hits. And poor Coal is getting slaughtered, lots more Coal Plants retiring in the next couple of years and NG will take up much of the slack.

    Very sad and dangerous situation. The EIA has blown the mid to long term call horribly on NG supply in the same way they blew the Monterey Shale call.

    Shorter term I'm not bullish on NG, deficit should be completely erased vs last year and the five year average by end of December and start heading towards surplus. Maybe we get a cold winter to help the Bulls, but its doubtful we will see a repeat of last years winter.

    I'm still totally Bullish on low cost NG producers and love UPL, and RRC. ECA and SWN are also good plays. Am getting a bit sick of SD, but if NG comes back this stock should do extremely well as their WTO is a very good dry gas play and the associated gas in the MidCon acreage will add lots of value.

    We've seen Haynessville, Fayettville, and Barnett go into terminal decline. The Marcellus and Eagle Ford continue to grow, but they too will go into decline - likely at a time that is commensurate with a huge uptick in demand. When will this occur is the question? Its likely sooner than the EIA and many others think - I've repeatedly said somewhere in the 2015 to 2017 time frame. Am leaning more towards the far side of that curve.

  • rainbow3100 by rainbow3100 Oct 27, 2014 1:59 PM Flag

    Google the following article:

    Drilling Deeper: A Reality Check on U.S. Government Forecasts for a Lasting Tight Oil & Shale Gas Boom

    FOR RELEASE OCTOBER 27, 2014

    Flawed Energy Department forecast misleads country, Congress on U.S. oil and natural gas

    Report from independent analyst who predicted vast Monterey Shale downgrade questions optimistic outlook

    A worrisome reliance on the industry’s point of view

    This article is a good read and lends credence to my forecast that Marcellus production is going to peak a lot sooner than most expect. Check out my post on Marcellus Legacy Decline.

    Once again, it's written by the guy that called out the EIA on its forecasts for the Monterey Shale, which was subsequently revised down by over 90%, now he says they are way off on both oil and gas forecasts.

  • Reply to

    mr rainbow

    by juan_ton_amigo Oct 22, 2014 11:41 PM
    rainbow3100 rainbow3100 Oct 23, 2014 11:15 PM Flag

    Juanton - Cleint9

    I've been out at my ranch hunting and taking care of Livestock management - killed two Rattlesnakes and couldn't help thinking about you. The grass and weeds are high, wish you were here to take a stroll thru the woods and tell our cowboys about how dumb Okies and Texans are.

    Now back to business, NG supply continues to impress, the deficit continues to narrow to last year and the 5 year average. I'm not bullish on NG at present and think we have to wait until 2016 for an upward Bull Market in NG. The stocks in this sector are very cheap now and represent good buys - diversify.

    Lots of Coal Plants retiring in 2015, but tons of renewables coming online in 2015 as well. NG is not going to rally much - maybe a rally in winter, but supply is going to outstrip demand going forward until 2016. I'm not an Oil guru, so can't give an educated guess on that front.

    I'll post more later on about the NG supply and demand imbalance if you don't antagonize me too much, it's very interesting in 2016 forward. Its a shame that people like you trash boards.

    Regardless, I've got a life off the board, am having fun with friends shooting birds, killing rattle snakes and archery hunting whitetail, axis, feral hogs, and wild turkeys at one of my ranches.

    The EIA has done a pretty good job on NG estimates so far. However, they blew the Monterey Shale call by over 90%- Google it.

    Are you on food stamps and government handout programs Juanton? Do you believe everything that our government spoon feeds you thru the media?

    I'm glad that I don't know you in person, you are a pathetic individual addicted to posting on a few Yahoo Message Boards. What kind of life do you live off of these boards? Take a walk, go outside and interact with nature. Do you even have any friends?

    Get a life!

  • Reply to

    Are low oil prices good for UPL?

    by neiljneil Oct 3, 2014 9:41 AM
    rainbow3100 rainbow3100 Oct 5, 2014 10:51 PM Flag

    Let me tell you something Juanton: I'm not a paid pumper. Just a guy that owns lots of minerals and acreage in TX and Oklahoma.

    I'm out at one of my Texas ranches hunting with friends. Its Bow Season, so far we have one nice 8 pointer that scored 127. We've also been shooting tons of doves and got lots of Teal a couple of weeks ago.

    I'll post a good NG topic after I get done hunting on Wednesday or Thursday. It will deal with Coal Plant retirements and Wind energy. It looks to me like wind is going to take up a lot of the slack in 2015, but 2016 is going to be the year for NG.

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