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Bank of America Corporation Message Board

reallyyousure 132 posts  |  Last Activity: 6 hours ago Member since: May 2, 2013
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  • reallyyousure reallyyousure 6 hours ago Flag

    I think you missed Al Sharpton's point. The vast majority of Americans of all races are tired of the systemic racism in this nation and its police force and wants to rid ourselves of that poison. People like you are going to be defeated. Get out of the way.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Reply to

    The evidence is what it is.

    by hacker_boob 9 hours ago
    reallyyousure reallyyousure 6 hours ago Flag

    My, my. Aren't you busy manufacturing a story to justify the killing of an unarmed black? If you need to do that I would think you believe the case is shaky and not believable. So you get busy manufacturing your own personal smear campaign. A little introspection on why you feel a need to do that is appropriate. Does your whole self worth depend on the denigration of others? Don't you realize how evil what you are doing is?

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Many of our laws are designed to benefit either an economic elite or a racial group and are corrupt. Laws are created by humans and reflect the limits and flaws of those humans. Just as we have economic laws and tax laws that benefit the wealthy and encourage the subjugation of the middle class, likewise we have social laws that benefit whites and amplify the difficulties of minorities. A socially conscious person seeks to change those laws because defending them is just a form of corruption.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • "Why is Chuck Hagel being canned after having been Defense chief for less than two years? Competence aside, part of the answer is the White House has moved from seeing events in Iraq and Syria through the Vietnam lens to the #$%$ Germany lens, and Hagel is still seeing them as Vietnam.

    "For the last fifty years, American foreign policy has swung between two polar-opposite views: Through the Vietnam lens, we don’t want to be dragged into foreign civil wars that can end up costing tens of thousands of American lives. But through the #$%$ Germany lens, we must stop barbarous and aggressive fascist movements before they overwhelm civilization. Obama himself began with Vietnam lenses but he and his advisers view the Islamic State as more like #$%$ Germany.

    "What do you think?"

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • reallyyousure reallyyousure Nov 24, 2014 12:09 PM Flag

    I have to guess that this is beyond your comprehension level, jhitcher. If Bank of America were broken up into five regional banks the stockholders would more than double their investment in less than a year. You would be in favor of it if you weren't so locked into your ideology.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Reply to

    How stupid is erazor?

    by bo.failure Nov 23, 2014 11:14 PM
    reallyyousure reallyyousure Nov 23, 2014 11:16 PM Flag

    Well, sounds like you have an ad homenim problem.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • reallyyousure reallyyousure Nov 23, 2014 11:15 PM Flag

    Oh, yes, he can. And soon, oh, yes, she can.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Reply to

    Growing the Economy With obamacare

    by hacker_boob Nov 23, 2014 7:53 PM
    reallyyousure reallyyousure Nov 23, 2014 9:37 PM Flag

    By coincidence the CEO is getting a bonus of around $800,000. Just coincidence, I'm sure....

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • reallyyousure reallyyousure Nov 23, 2014 9:33 PM Flag

    All children of presidents attend private schools because they would be vulnerable to kidnapping in public schools. You are being pretty stupid by bringing that issue up.

    Anyway, where is the flood? You confused with Noah's flood?

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • "On Friday, William C. Dudley, president of the New York Fed, told Senators his examiners were “not like a cop on the beat” but “more like a fire warden.” But the NY Fed is supposed to ensure Wall Street banks obey the law, not put out fires after they break it. The Senators focused their ire on the revolving door between the NY Fed and the banks (a former examiner now with Goldman Sachs recently got confidential information from a former Fed colleague about a pending investigation, for example). But the bigger problem is presidents of the NY Fed, like Dudley, aren't chosen by Congress or even by the Federal Reserve Board in Washington. They're chosen by the 9 directors of the NY Fed, six of whom are elected by the banks they're supposed to oversee. It’s bad enough when foxes are in charge of chicken coops, worse when they’re in charge of foxes.

    "Wall Street is once again out of control, the biggest banks are bigger than ever, and their campaign contributions are preventing any fundamental reform (the Dodd-Frank act has been watered down to cold soup). We must resurrect Glass-Steagall and break up the big banks. But how do we get this done?"

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • "It's important to understand CEOs are not job creators. Nor are the rich. Nor are corporations. The job creators are the middle class and the poor, whose purchases are the reason businesses create jobs. If the middle class and poor aren't paid enough, job creation slows. Which is why a higher minimum wage creates jobs."

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • "PS: I don’t think it’s possible for Republicans to win the 2016 presidential election or keep control of the Senate. That’s because the GOP is disappearing from the most heavily populated sections of the country while increasing its lead in a declining bloc of aging, white, rural voters. Look at voting demographics and you get the likely 2016 voting map below (based on 2014’s returns, New Hampshire and Virginia are turning blue, and Georgia is now at play).

    "As to the Senate, Democrats in 2014 had to defend 13 Senate seats in red or purple states. In 2016 Republicans will be defending 24 Senate seats; at least 18 are likely to be competitive based on geography and demographics. Democrats will be defending precisely one seat that could possibly be competitive."

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • "This is the time of year when high school seniors apply to college and I get lots of mail from anguished parents about whether college is worth the cost. It is. Young people with college degrees continue to earn far more than people without them, and this college “premium” keeps rising.

    "But a college degree no longer guarantees a good job. In fact, 46 percent of recent college grads are now working in jobs that don’t require college degrees. Here's the reason: Globalization and technological advances increased the demand for college-educated workers until around 2000, after which time corporations began outsourcing college-type work to highly skilled workers abroad, and advanced software began taking over many other tasks that had been done college-educated workers. But because the supply of well-educated workers has continued to grow notwithstanding, the starting wages of college graduates have actually dropped since 2000 (women grads by 8.1%, male grads by 6.7 percent).

    "Bottom line: While a college education is now a prerequisite for joining the middle class, the middle class’s share of the total economic pie continues to shrink as the share going to the very top continues to grow. So, yes, a college degree is worth the cost because it at least enables a young person to tread water. Without the degree, a young person can easily drown."

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • "Don’t let anyone tell you the President’s executive order will cost American jobs. According to the best analysis I’ve seen, based on what happened after the 1986 amnesty, it will boost the incomes of the undocumented workers affected the order, because they'll be able to move easily between jobs. As they spend this additional money, that spending will create 160,000 new jobs. It will also boost federal tax revenues by $2.5 billion."

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • "Some of your frequently-addressed questions and my answers:
    -- Do you write these posts yourself? Yes.
    -- When do you find the time? Usually soon after I wake up. It’s not very time-consuming.
    -- Do you read our responses? Not all. Mainly those that get the most likes.
    -- Are you depressed by what’s happened to the country? No. I’m worried about widening inequality. And I’m angry at politicians who do the bidding of Wall Street, big corporations, and billionaires. But I'm actually quite optimistic about the long term.
    -- I want to make a difference. What would you advise me to do? Get involved in politics. Run for your school board or other local office. Get involved in a campaign of someone you admire at the state or federal level. Get your friends involved. Reach out to people you disagree with.
    -- Will you run for president? No.
    -- What are you working on now? I’ve just finished the first draft of a new book, tentatively entitled “Saving Capitalism.” It will be out in September."

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • "I’m just returning from Toronto, where I met with Canadian academics, public officials, and others who are trying to do something to reverse widening inequality there. (Last night, a wonderful event at the Broadbent Institute.) Several observations: (1) The same centrifugal forces splitting the United States – globalization and technological advances -- are splitting Canada, as they are every nation. (2) Reversing the trend is a matter of political will. At the least, it requires a progressive tax system, strong unions, a high minimum wage and wage subsidies, and a first-class educational system starting with infants and extending all the way through university. (3) Canada isn’t as far along on the inequality path as is the U.S. because it has done better on many of these dimensions, but it’s trending toward the U.S. because its commitment to these sorts of policies has waned in recent years.

    "Bottom line: Reversing inequality of income and wealth is less an economic challenge than a political one. But as income and wealth concentrate at the top, political power does as well – thereby undermining the political capacity of a nation to respond."

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • One of his best speeches. If the Republicans don't like it then pass an immigration bill in the House!

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • "Before you hear tonight’s GOP spin about President Obama acting on his own without congressional authority, you should know about the administrative actions on immigration under two of the last three Republican presidents – both done as part of normal enforcement discretion, without specific congressional authorization. In 1987, the Reagan administration announced blanket deferral of deportation for children left out of the 1986 congressional amnesty bill. This affected more than 100,000 families. Subsequently, in 1989, despite continued congressional inaction, George H. W. Bush extended “family fairness” relief to include spouses and unmarried children of the 1986 amnesty class, affecting up to 1.5 million family members. That came to over 40 percent of the 3.5 million undocumented immigrants at the time.

    "But don’t expect Republicans to refer back to Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush tonight. When recalling history that runs counter to their current ideology they suffer a bad case of amnesia."

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • reallyyousure by reallyyousure Nov 20, 2014 3:02 PM Flag

    "Global warming isn't real because it was cold today!! Also great news: World hunger is over because I just ate."

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • "The number of people applying for unemployment benefits declined slightly last week, the Labor Department reported today. Weekly applications are nearly at their lowest since 2000. The number of people receiving benefits is also the lowest since 2000. Does this mean jobs are now plentiful?

    "No. All it means is fewer people are eligible for unemployment benefits. In fact, only 23% of the unemployed now get benefits – the lowest percent in over 70 years. Of the 9 million unemployed, almost a third have exhausted their benefits because they’ve been out of work six months or longer, and House Republicans refuse to extend benefits to them. Others are ineligible either because they hadn’t been in their last jobs long enough to qualify before being laid off, or are young people who can’t find a first job. In addition, more than 7 million are working part-time jobs but need full-time work (compared to 4.6 million part-timers before the recession). Overall, 2 million fewer Americans have full-time work now than before the downturn. And, did I mention, most peoples' wages are still going nowhere?"

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

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