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Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company Limited Message Board

sarfralogy 17 posts  |  Last Activity: Jul 30, 2012 2:15 PM Member since: Apr 11, 2012
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  • A few years ago, BlackBerry maker Research In Motion (RIM) introduced the Blackberry Enterprise Service (BES) Express. The free software works with existing servers, such as Microsoft Exchange Server and IBM Lotus Domino, to allow businesses to centrally manage the smartphones they provide to employees. Among the features are the ability to shutdown and wipe clean stolen devices, control security settings and reset passwords.
    http://www.patexia.com/feed/rim-ordered-to-pay-mobile-device-management-company-147-mil-in-ip-dispute-20120727

  • sarfralogy by sarfralogy Jul 17, 2012 3:08 PM Flag

    The risks of variability seem to play by similar rules as Moore’s Law, offsetting the increase in performance with a decrease in consistency. Similarly, the costs attributed to upgrading manufacturing facilities include increasingly complex machinery to offset this. The economy of scaling favors the big players more and more as technology develops.
    It seems that TSMC is no different than other fabs
    there is more pressure to go with better technology at lower cost http://www.patexia.com/feed/economies-of-scaling-20120716

  • Members of the tech media are falling all over themselves to weigh in on the Microsoft Surface. Unveiled during what many refer to as an Apple-like spectacle, the iPad-like Surface has caused reactions ranging from second-coming awe to dismissive derision. The first PC ever for Redmond! The iPad killer! The next Zune!
    Pragmatically speaking, Microsoft is no stranger to tangible products, and Apple has shown that a company can do very well indeed with a focused and integrated mix of OS and hardware. And Redmond has never shied away from pushing a late-arriving underdog into an unknown and unfriendly market.
    http://www.patexia.com/feed/surface-tension-could-microsoft-lose-by-winning-20120622

  • Supercomputers, initially developed by Seymour Cray in the 1960s, were originally used to assist scientists with nuclear physics research. These complex systems, back then and today, are classified as "dual-use" by many governing bodies -- including the United States Federal government -- which means that they have both civilian and military application. Because of these dual capabilities, countries do not strive to have the title of the world's fastest supercomputer simply for bragging rights, but because it is imperative for reasons of national security.
    According to NNSA Administrator Thomas D'Agostino, "Computing platforms like Sequoia help the United States keep its nuclear stockpile safe, secure and effective without the need for underground testing" and "give us increased confidence in the nation's nuclear deterrent as the weapons stockpile changes under treaty agreements."
    Article: http://www.patexia.com/feed/ibm-s-sequoia-and-the-politics-of-dual-use-supercomputers-20120621

  • In a press release Monday, Intel announced the acquisition of a variety of wireless patents related to 3G, LTE and 802.11 technologies. The acquisition, though sizeable, seems to have been "business as usual" for both companies involved. There is little indication that this will change Intel's product strategy going forward, but it will give them a boost in patent defense, an increasingly important part of being a consumer tech company. http://www.patexia.com/feed/intel-acquires-sizeable-patent-portfolio-20120620

  • At $38 a share, Zuckerberg's 503.6 million shares and options are valued at $19.1 billion, surpassing the wealth of Google Inc. co- founders Sergey Brin and Larry Page.

    “Zuckerberg doesn’t think about his wealth,” David Kirkpatrick, author of “The Facebook Effect,” a history of the company, said in an interview on May 17. “This is a huge success for everybody. There’s no way it can be seen otherwise.”
    http://www.patexia.com/companies/facebook-inc-us

  • The figure of the day is "$100 billion." But activist Shaunna Thomas notes you shouldn't forget about "0" -- the number of women on Facebook's board.

    Thomas, co-founder of women's advocacy group Ultraviolet, which organized a protest at Facebook's New York headquarters last month, said in a statement:

    Today, as Wall Street, the media and entrepreneurs around the world watch with great interest the historic Facebook IPO one story that has not gotten much attention is that while many will make millions today, women will not have a seat at the table. Literally. Facebook does not have a single woman on their board. The fact that a company as large as Facebook with a massive global reach does not have a single woman on their board is nothing short of shameful. We will continue our campaign to get women on the Facebook board because in 2012 no company with the massive global reach of Facebook should shut women out of the board room.
    http://www.patexia.com/companies/facebook-inc-us

  • Samsung and LG have positioned OLED as the next generation display technology. Both are poised to launch competing models of big, edgy TVs they hope will jumpstart a stagnant, saturated market. But is OLED magic enough to disrupt a space clogged with cheaper, proven LED technology, now established as the brains behind our must-see TV. Time will definitely tell. Even a Samsung executive admitted any serious OLED market penetration would take several years, while scale and market forces eat away at the proposed $9,000 sticker price. Sony and Panasonic have something to say about the future of TV, too. But the two Japanese legends are running behind and have yet to say anything meaningful.
    http://www.patexia.com/feed/oled-tv-is-a-race-between-countries

  • A quiet battle is currently raging over computer memory. The combatants, many of whom are also allies, include Japan and South Korea, DRAM and NAND, solid-state and hard drives. Although the short-term results are always in question, the long-term war is virtually a foregone conclusion -- because it's part of the revolution of mobile over desktop, and there's no question which side will eventually triumph.
    This particular battle is over Elpida, the Japanese DRAM manufacturer that declared bankruptcy in February 2012. On one hand, Elpida is a ripe plum; bidders such as Micron, SK Hyrix, and a pair of private equity firms look at Elpida's valuable 2011 R&D work on DRAM, ReRAM, and especially the hot property, NAND.
    Source: http://www.patexia.com/feed/the-memory-market-short-and-long-term

  • A quiet battle is currently raging over computer memory. The combatants, many of whom are also allies, include Japan and South Korea, DRAM and NAND, solid-state and hard drives. Although the short-term results are always in question, the long-term war is virtually a foregone conclusion -- because it's part of the revolution of mobile over desktop, and there's no question which side will eventually triumph.
    This particular battle is over Elpida, the Japanese DRAM manufacturer that declared bankruptcy in February 2012. On one hand, Elpida is a ripe plum; bidders such as Micron, SK Hyrix, and a pair of private equity firms look at Elpida's valuable 2011 R&D work on DRAM, ReRAM, and especially the hot property, NAND.
    http://www.patexia.com/feed/the-memory-market-short-and-long-term

  • Toshiba invented NAND flash twenty five years ago. Today, flash memory is used in iPhones and iPads, and a myriad of mobile gadgets used by hundreds of millions of people -- at least -- around the world. Still a leader in flash memory, Toshiba continues pushing forward. The company recently received a patent for a ReRAM device that may soon replace both NAND flash and DRAM. ReRAM (or RRAM, for resistive random-access memory) is a non-volatile memory type developed independently by several companies, including Toshiba, HP and others.
    http://www.patexia.com/feed/is-the-age-of-reram-upon-us-

  • Toshiba invented NAND flash twenty five years ago. Today, flash memory is used in iPhones and iPads, and a myriad of mobile gadgets used by hundreds of millions of people -- at least -- around the world. Still a leader in flash memory, Toshiba continues pushing forward. The company recently received a patent for a ReRAM device that may soon replace both NAND flash and DRAM. ReRAM (or RRAM, for resistive random-access memory) is a non-volatile memory type developed independently by several companies, including Toshiba, HP and others.
    http://www.patexia.com/feed/is-the-age-of-reram-upon-us-

  • Toshiba invented NAND flash twenty five years ago. Today, flash memory is used in iPhones and iPads, and a myriad of mobile gadgets used by hundreds of millions of people -- at least -- around the world. Still a leader in flash memory, Toshiba continues pushing forward. The company recently received a patent for a ReRAM device that may soon replace both NAND flash and DRAM. ReRAM (or RRAM, for resistive random-access memory) is a non-volatile memory type developed independently by several companies, including Toshiba, HP and others.
    http://www.patexia.com/feed/is-the-age-of-reram-upon-us-

  • Google’s come up with its solution for Dropbox: If you can’t buy ‘em, copy ‘em. The search engine and online advertising giant replaced its popular Google Docs service with Google Drive, a cloud computing storage service designed to directly compete with start up Dropbox. This raises the question, has Google become the new Microsoft?
    Us ancient folk who remember the 1990s and the Microsoft anti-trust trial can certainly notice some parallels. A big, dare we say monolithic, company doesn’t bother innovating on its own. It just waits for other companies to innovate, makes some changes for legally significant distinctions and enters into competition with the innovator. Sound familiar?
    Still, Google is not unchallenged in its supremacy. Bing has gained a bit of traction as a search engine, showing that Microsoft isn’t dead or stagnant by any means. Yahoo! is always trying to regain its place in the search engine world. And not everything Google does comes across as the Second Coming in the market. Google Plus+ currently has fewer subscribers than MySpace, if that tells you anything. So it’s by no means a done deal that Google Drive is going to push Dropbox and other upstarts out of existence.

    /Full Story/Source: http://www.patexia.com/feed/is-google-the-new-microsoft-4156

  • Google’s come up with its solution for Dropbox: If you can’t buy ‘em, copy ‘em. The search engine and online advertising giant replaced its popular Google Docs service with Google Drive, a cloud computing storage service designed to directly compete with start up Dropbox. This raises the question, has Google become the new Microsoft?
    Us ancient folk who remember the 1990s and the Microsoft anti-trust trial can certainly notice some parallels. A big, dare we say monolithic, company doesn’t bother innovating on its own. It just waits for other companies to innovate, makes some changes for legally significant distinctions and enters into competition with the innovator. Sound familiar?
    Still, Google is not unchallenged in its supremacy. Bing has gained a bit of traction as a search engine, showing that Microsoft isn’t dead or stagnant by any means. Yahoo! is always trying to regain its place in the search engine world. And not everything Google does comes across as the Second Coming in the market. Google Plus+ currently has fewer subscribers than MySpace, if that tells you anything. So it’s by no means a done deal that Google Drive is going to push Dropbox and other upstarts out of existence.

    Source: http://www.patexia.com/feed/is-google-the-new-microsoft-4156

  • The Seattle Times first reported this morning that a German court has awarded Motorola an injunction against the import of Microsoft's Xbox gaming system. The court found that Microsoft infringed on two of Motorola's patents efining a standard video codec, according to Fosspatents.

    Original Source: http://www.patexia.com/feed/german-court-awards-motorola-xbox-injunction-4147

  • Today, Intel unveiled the Intel studybook -- a purpose-built tablet designed to open the doors to education and provide a window on history, math, science, reading and more. Backed up by the Intel Learning Series (Intel LS) software suite, the rugged tablet is supported by a broad global education ecosystem.
    read full story http://www.patexia.com/feed/intel-s-studybook-designed-as-purpose-built-education-tablet-3779

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