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Intel Corporation Message Board

semi_equip_junkie 169 posts  |  Last Activity: 7 hours ago Member since: Feb 16, 2012
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  • Reply to

    Directionless Computing

    by wicked_waldo 9 hours ago
    semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie 7 hours ago Flag

    what subject waldo?
    I am interested Intel moving to EUV -
    Intel is a great long term hold
    and everybody needs to keep up with intel-
    do you finally get it waldo

  • Reply to

    Directionless Computing

    by wicked_waldo 9 hours ago
    semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie 8 hours ago Flag

    Clear goals. Now, the carpet has shifted from under them.

    MAYBE YOU SHOULD SET THE GOALS ..s m a r t

    waldo - you never been a manager ....just disgruntled

  • semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie 9 hours ago Flag

    waldblow
    do you have a mirror and do you ask the mirror every morning who is the greatest chartist / technician in the world...
    you sold Intel at 20 and it went up to 37 - but you are giving "investment advise" - oink, oink

    oh yeah semi revised capex down for 2015 from 7.3% up to 3% up - No big deal -
    it's just a pushout.

  • Reply to

    Directionless Computing

    by wicked_waldo 9 hours ago
    semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie 9 hours ago Flag

    Intel (INTC) Stock Gains on Quantum Computing Investment

    Really ? you crack me up

    BTW
    did you notice the talking head Betsy not once mentioned the term inventory correction or mention that it is expected coming to an end in Q3 -
    she probably paid for the IC insight report but kept harping on the ALTR aquisition
    she's as useless as you are

  • semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie 18 hours ago Flag

    Chips in general are doing well - including TSMC and equipment stocks.
    I wonder what happened to waldblows chart over the last week or so - so far it looks like he's more a contrarian.
    I think the "big" news is that the inventory correction is coming to an end according IC insight and that was somewhat confirmed by TSMC CEO.
    According to PLAB (they make the mask sets) TSMC will finally have more products @ 16nm node.
    10 nm will be a big node for equipment makers (2016, 2017)

  • semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie Sep 2, 2015 10:17 PM Flag

    Hmmm, I know a lot about processor technology

    you do?!!!!

    Programmable chips are thirty years old. They are also slow and have a limited lifetime.

    you are a oxy moron

  • Reply to

    I guess this answers the question

    by wallisweaver Sep 2, 2015 11:01 AM
    semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie Sep 2, 2015 10:13 PM Flag

    hey blowhead
    what u know?

  • Reply to

    I guess this answers the question

    by wallisweaver Sep 2, 2015 11:01 AM
    semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie Sep 2, 2015 10:13 PM Flag

    TSMC and Samsung will have 10nm before Intel.

    keep repeating the same BS ...
    but here are the facts ....
    14/16 nm Finfet is based on 20 nm design rules and TSMC, Samsung "10 nm" will be based on 14nm -
    intel is way ahead doofus - and Intel will implement advanced packaging.
    And if Intel can implement EUV @ 10 nm it will be a home run

  • semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie Sep 2, 2015 6:18 PM Flag

    20W through 55cm

    that would 4 and 1/2 feet.....

  • Reply to

    Hows dat chat looking?

    by semi_equip_junkie Sep 2, 2015 4:04 PM
    semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie Sep 2, 2015 6:14 PM Flag

    George Liu stated that the short-term inventory adjustments in the global IC business is coming to an end

    wasn't excess inventory and "saturation" one of the reasons why the chart went" sour"?
    China imports chips in order to export "finished goods" - if they want to increase exports they will purchase more chips....on a relative base chips are probably least affected by a slowdown in China

    “It’s still too early to say that the smartphone market is declined, because there is no other replacement of smartphone yet.” commented George Liu. “In the long run, the prospect of the semiconductor industry is positive.”
    George Liu stated that the short-term inventory adjustments in the global IC business is coming to an end. Ultimately, the outlook of the semiconductor and foundry industry is bright and light.
    Furthermore, George Liu considered it’s still too early to say that the growth of the smartphone market has been slowing down. In other words, smartphone will still be the main growth driver of the industry in terms of the demand of sensors.
    Last but not least, though it needs more time for IoT market to grow, George Liu is optimistic toward it will drive the sensor demand and new applications.

  • semi_equip_junkie by semi_equip_junkie Sep 2, 2015 4:04 PM Flag

    next week we'll know more

  • semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie Sep 2, 2015 12:17 AM Flag

    looks pretty bleak for ARM Waldo -
    intel 14 nm might hit the sweet spot for large screen smartphones - hey and 2 in 1 are going to cannibalize ARM even more -

  • semi_equip_junkie by semi_equip_junkie Sep 1, 2015 6:18 PM Flag

    TrendForce is predicting that shipments of tablets will fall by 14.9 percent this year to 163 million units, as once-popular 7-inch mini-tablets are displaced by 6-inch smartphones or phablets. But it's not all bad news. TrendForce is also predicting that shipments of large tablets such as Microsoft's Surface Pro range and Apple's forthcoming 12.9-inch iPad Pro will grow as usage extends from entertainment to business, from content consumption to creation.
    Shipments of Microsoft Surfaces will grow from 1.5 million in the first half of 2015 to 2.6 million in the second half, according to TrendForce. It says: "The success of Surface 3 also proves that 2-in-1 PCs with better specs have the potential to expand into the business application market. Based on TrendForce's analysis, Microsoft's tablet shipments this year will soar 52 percent year on year and hit the four-million-unit mark."

    TrendForce's prediction is much lower than IDC's. The US-based research company recently (August 26) predicted 212 million tablet shipments in 2015, a year-on-year decline of 8.0 percent. (See: Tablet shipments to fall 8 percent in 2015, says IDC)

    IDC also said that Windows' market share grew by 59.5 percent to 17.7 million units. It added: "IDC expects the share of larger screen ( 10") tablets and 2-in-1's will grow from 18.6 percent in 2014 to 39.5 percent in 2019, fuelled by the impact of phablets and a growing commercial appetite for productivity solutions."

  • semi_equip_junkie by semi_equip_junkie Sep 1, 2015 6:09 PM Flag

    Samsung is probably loosing more than Intel in mobile considering DRAM and NAND is doing very well for Samsung -
    Tepid demand for Samsung Electronics' newest Galaxy smartphones triggered a fifth straight monthly decline in share prices for the electronics maker, wiping out about $44 billion in market value since April -- almost equivalent to the value of General Motors. Samsung's global smartphone market share fell more than 3% points in the second quarter, and it no longer is the top seller in China, the world's biggest mobile-phone market.

    It is being undercut at the high end by Apple's bigger iPhones and at the mid-range and low end of the market by devices from Xiaomi, Lenovo and Huawei.

    Samsung misread demand for the S6 models released in April, failing to produce enough three-sided screens for the Edge while the regular version struggled against the iPhone.

    One of its latest models, the Galaxy Note 5, was criticized by reviewers and customers this month as the company acknowledged that the device can break if the stylus is inserted backward into the storage slot.

    Samsung's decision to steal a march on Apple and advance the release of new Galaxy smartphones failed to dispel pessimism about its second-half earnings. Apple is expected to take the wraps off a new iPhone on Sept. 9 and release it in time for the crucial end-of-year holiday shopping season.

    "We all know its smartphone business isn't doing well," said Lee Seung Woo, an analyst at IBK Securities Co. in Seoul. "I can't really figure out when the stock will stop declining. The fundamentals look problematic."

    The stock has been the biggest drag on the 758-member Kospi index in the past six months, leading the benchmark 2.2% lower in the period. It ended Friday at 1,089,000 won.

    Samsung profit has fallen five straight quarters, and third-quarter net income is estimated at 5.33 trillion won ($4.5 billion), down from 5.63 trillion won in the three months ended #$%$

  • Reply to

    Not impressed with Wall Street

    by wallisweaver Sep 1, 2015 4:47 PM
    semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie Sep 1, 2015 5:43 PM Flag

    However, there is one hurdle that stands in the way of the acquisition. GlobalFoundries has the 14nm FinFET process licensed by Samsung, which will most likely forbid the acquisition to take place in order to put an end to any competition that might surface to overthrow the tech giant.

  • Reply to

    Not impressed with Wall Street

    by wallisweaver Sep 1, 2015 4:47 PM
    semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie Sep 1, 2015 5:40 PM Flag

    A commodity like crude swings 8% up and down within 48 hours - that shows how disconnected crude is from "real supply and demand" - I mean from market participants that actually use it - a complete zoo

    Speaking of China ....they are actually trying to buy...stick with semiconductors - the sky is not falling....I wonder how Samsung feels about this - GF is licensing Samsung's FinFet.

    According to a Taiwanese source, China-based Hua Capital Management has approached Globalfoundries in order to convince the firm to be acquired. Hua Capital Management is not a name that should be forgotten so easily, since this is the firm that was successfully able to acquire smartphone camera sensor manufacturer
    Omnivision

  • Reply to

    Micron

    by semi_equip_junkie Aug 28, 2015 11:41 PM
    semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie Aug 28, 2015 11:52 PM Flag

    “To be frank, we cannot achieve the applications and system needs without developing a really good packaging technology,” said Graham. “We’re not going to achieve these bandwidth capabilities. We’re not going to achieve the reliability needs. We’re not going to overcome some of the scaling challenges without developing some of these new technology methods. If you look at Hybrid Memory Cube, that’s been the lead vehicle for Micron in order to develop these package technologies for future emerging memories.”

    Got it???
    blowhead won't - he still is still on his chart trip

  • Reply to

    Micron

    by semi_equip_junkie Aug 28, 2015 11:41 PM
    semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie Aug 28, 2015 11:44 PM Flag

    Challenges to the Longevity of DRAM

    Graham also spoke about the impacts of DRAM process complexity, noting that as the industry scales from 50nm to 30nm and then to 20nm, complexity drives really significant upticks in the number of mask levels, by over 35 percent. The number of non-litho steps per critical mask level is up a staggering 110 percent, going from 30nm to 20nm. Clean room space per wafer output is up over 80 percent. Since acquiring Elpida in 2013, Micron says is is getting ahead of its original plan on hitting the 20nm yield. Keeping cost per bit down is a key goal and Micron believes it can enable this by facilitating the scaling path to sub-15nm DRAM. Specifically, Graham noted 1Xnm is driving over a 30 percent improvement in cost per Gb over 20nm.

    DRAM is still the primary memory inside nearly every computer, from mobile phones to datacenter servers to supercomputers. But with scaling challenges, improvements have already started slowing. There are also power concerns with DRAM main memory systems accounting for about 30-50 percent of a node’s overall power consumption. These points are all highlighted in a recent journal article written by authors Jeffrey S. Vetter and Sparsh Mittal (of Oak Ridge National Laboratory). The duo then set out to examine what the future might hold for non-volatile memory systems in extreme-scale high performance computing systems.

    “For DRAM, there are possible improvements from redesigning and optimizing DRAM protocols, moving DRAM closer to processors, and improved manufacturing processes,” they write. “In fact, this integration of memory onto the package in future systems may provide for performance and power benefits of about one order of magnitude [5]. Second, emerging memory technologies with different characteristics could replace or complement DRAM [13, 15, 19, 24].”

    In another part of the paper, Vetter and Mittal write: “Moreover, as the benefits of device scaling for DRAM memory slow, it will become increas

  • semi_equip_junkie by semi_equip_junkie Aug 28, 2015 11:41 PM Flag

    In a packed session at IDF 2015 in San Francisco last week, Scott Graham, Micron’s general manager of Hybrid Memory, discussed some of the key themes occurring in the memory landscape from Micron’s perspective.

    “It’s an exciting time in the industry and there’s a lot going on with memory development in system architecture and software architecture and how they combine together to provide system solutions in the server, mobile computing and embedded and networking environments,” he offered as prelude.

    Noting that Micron has a portfolio that spans across platforms and sectors, Graham asked the primarily developer audience to consider how they can use these new and existing memory technologies to develop platforms to solve complex challenges out in the industry.

    As the focus in computing moves from the compute bottleneck to the data bottleneck with the slow down of Moore’s law and the proliferation of data, memory and storage technologies are more important than ever. And while HPC certainly has some unique challenges and specific requirements, many concerns related to price, performance and system balance are shared across the larger computing market.

    Memory is more diversified than ever and Micron has several technologies and products that are optimized for power and performance and target HPC, including Hybrid Memory Cube, solid state drives, NVDIMMs, 3D NAND, and most recently 3D XPoint, which it developed with partner Intel. The non-volatile memory process technology, unveiled last month, is being heralded by its backers as the first new memory category since the introduction of NAND flash in 1989.

    3D XPoint, said Graham, previewing content to come later in his presentation, delivers 1000X the performance of regular multi-level cell (MLC) NAND and 10X higher density than a conventional volatile memory, such as DRAM.

    The Update

    Graham went on to deliver a technology update for the four key technologies that undergird Micron’s portfolio: DRAM, NAND, package technology (aka Hybrid Memory Cube), and new memory technology (aka 3D XPoint).

    In terms of DRAM, Graham said the product continues to come along nicely with strong progress for 20nm yield. And Micron has 1Xnm development underway in Asia and 1Y/1Znm in the US.

    For NAND, 16nm TLC NAND is also ramping up, but Micron will be focusing their efforts more on 3D NAND. First generation 3D NAND is on track for production now, and Micron will move to second generation next year.

    Micron notes its 3D packaging technology, which has been productized in the HMC line, continues to mature. The company is currently manufacturing HMC generation 2, and will be launching HMC generation 3 over the next year to enable even higher density and bandwidth. Graham reviewed that on the networking side, it is being used in data packet processing and in data packet buffering and storage applications. For the high performance computing space, HMC is used for very high-speed, high-bandwidth technology transactions.

    “To be frank, we cannot achieve the applications and system needs without developing a really good packaging technology,” said Graham. “We’re not going to achieve these bandwidth capabilities. We’re not going to achieve the reliability needs. We’re not going to overcome some of the scaling challenges without developing some of these new technology methods. If you look at Hybrid Memory Cube, that’s been the lead vehicle for Micron in order to develop these package technologies for future emerging memories.”

    Graham went on to review the benefits of Micron’s in-package memory, stating that it helps to achieve bandwidth, efficiency and form factor all in one package. “If we have the ability to take DRAM and stack it on top of a logic layer and SoC and be able to control that DRAM with that SoC, it allows us to overcome scaling challenges. Being able to combine these technologies together, gives us unprecedented memory bandwidth that keeps pace with multiple CPU cores, and DRAM alone is not going to do that. This all allows for increased savings in energy/bit, density in a small form factor, higher performance and lower energy, and compelling RAS features,” Graham continues.

  • Reply to

    Why Intel will spend $16.7 billion on Altera

    by wallisweaver Aug 28, 2015 10:29 AM
    semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie Aug 28, 2015 10:59 PM Flag

    Programmable chips are thirty years old.

    you're so dumb - I can't believe it

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