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Intel Corporation Message Board

semi_equip_junkie 155 posts  |  Last Activity: Aug 28, 2015 11:52 PM Member since: Feb 16, 2012
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  • Reply to

    Micron

    by semi_equip_junkie Aug 28, 2015 11:41 PM
    semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie Aug 28, 2015 11:52 PM Flag

    “To be frank, we cannot achieve the applications and system needs without developing a really good packaging technology,” said Graham. “We’re not going to achieve these bandwidth capabilities. We’re not going to achieve the reliability needs. We’re not going to overcome some of the scaling challenges without developing some of these new technology methods. If you look at Hybrid Memory Cube, that’s been the lead vehicle for Micron in order to develop these package technologies for future emerging memories.”

    Got it???
    blowhead won't - he still is still on his chart trip

  • Reply to

    Micron

    by semi_equip_junkie Aug 28, 2015 11:41 PM
    semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie Aug 28, 2015 11:44 PM Flag

    Challenges to the Longevity of DRAM

    Graham also spoke about the impacts of DRAM process complexity, noting that as the industry scales from 50nm to 30nm and then to 20nm, complexity drives really significant upticks in the number of mask levels, by over 35 percent. The number of non-litho steps per critical mask level is up a staggering 110 percent, going from 30nm to 20nm. Clean room space per wafer output is up over 80 percent. Since acquiring Elpida in 2013, Micron says is is getting ahead of its original plan on hitting the 20nm yield. Keeping cost per bit down is a key goal and Micron believes it can enable this by facilitating the scaling path to sub-15nm DRAM. Specifically, Graham noted 1Xnm is driving over a 30 percent improvement in cost per Gb over 20nm.

    DRAM is still the primary memory inside nearly every computer, from mobile phones to datacenter servers to supercomputers. But with scaling challenges, improvements have already started slowing. There are also power concerns with DRAM main memory systems accounting for about 30-50 percent of a node’s overall power consumption. These points are all highlighted in a recent journal article written by authors Jeffrey S. Vetter and Sparsh Mittal (of Oak Ridge National Laboratory). The duo then set out to examine what the future might hold for non-volatile memory systems in extreme-scale high performance computing systems.

    “For DRAM, there are possible improvements from redesigning and optimizing DRAM protocols, moving DRAM closer to processors, and improved manufacturing processes,” they write. “In fact, this integration of memory onto the package in future systems may provide for performance and power benefits of about one order of magnitude [5]. Second, emerging memory technologies with different characteristics could replace or complement DRAM [13, 15, 19, 24].”

    In another part of the paper, Vetter and Mittal write: “Moreover, as the benefits of device scaling for DRAM memory slow, it will become increas

  • semi_equip_junkie by semi_equip_junkie Aug 28, 2015 11:41 PM Flag

    In a packed session at IDF 2015 in San Francisco last week, Scott Graham, Micron’s general manager of Hybrid Memory, discussed some of the key themes occurring in the memory landscape from Micron’s perspective.

    “It’s an exciting time in the industry and there’s a lot going on with memory development in system architecture and software architecture and how they combine together to provide system solutions in the server, mobile computing and embedded and networking environments,” he offered as prelude.

    Noting that Micron has a portfolio that spans across platforms and sectors, Graham asked the primarily developer audience to consider how they can use these new and existing memory technologies to develop platforms to solve complex challenges out in the industry.

    As the focus in computing moves from the compute bottleneck to the data bottleneck with the slow down of Moore’s law and the proliferation of data, memory and storage technologies are more important than ever. And while HPC certainly has some unique challenges and specific requirements, many concerns related to price, performance and system balance are shared across the larger computing market.

    Memory is more diversified than ever and Micron has several technologies and products that are optimized for power and performance and target HPC, including Hybrid Memory Cube, solid state drives, NVDIMMs, 3D NAND, and most recently 3D XPoint, which it developed with partner Intel. The non-volatile memory process technology, unveiled last month, is being heralded by its backers as the first new memory category since the introduction of NAND flash in 1989.

    3D XPoint, said Graham, previewing content to come later in his presentation, delivers 1000X the performance of regular multi-level cell (MLC) NAND and 10X higher density than a conventional volatile memory, such as DRAM.

    The Update

    Graham went on to deliver a technology update for the four key technologies that undergird Micron’s portfolio: DRAM, NAND, package technology (aka Hybrid Memory Cube), and new memory technology (aka 3D XPoint).

    In terms of DRAM, Graham said the product continues to come along nicely with strong progress for 20nm yield. And Micron has 1Xnm development underway in Asia and 1Y/1Znm in the US.

    For NAND, 16nm TLC NAND is also ramping up, but Micron will be focusing their efforts more on 3D NAND. First generation 3D NAND is on track for production now, and Micron will move to second generation next year.

    Micron notes its 3D packaging technology, which has been productized in the HMC line, continues to mature. The company is currently manufacturing HMC generation 2, and will be launching HMC generation 3 over the next year to enable even higher density and bandwidth. Graham reviewed that on the networking side, it is being used in data packet processing and in data packet buffering and storage applications. For the high performance computing space, HMC is used for very high-speed, high-bandwidth technology transactions.

    “To be frank, we cannot achieve the applications and system needs without developing a really good packaging technology,” said Graham. “We’re not going to achieve these bandwidth capabilities. We’re not going to achieve the reliability needs. We’re not going to overcome some of the scaling challenges without developing some of these new technology methods. If you look at Hybrid Memory Cube, that’s been the lead vehicle for Micron in order to develop these package technologies for future emerging memories.”

    Graham went on to review the benefits of Micron’s in-package memory, stating that it helps to achieve bandwidth, efficiency and form factor all in one package. “If we have the ability to take DRAM and stack it on top of a logic layer and SoC and be able to control that DRAM with that SoC, it allows us to overcome scaling challenges. Being able to combine these technologies together, gives us unprecedented memory bandwidth that keeps pace with multiple CPU cores, and DRAM alone is not going to do that. This all allows for increased savings in energy/bit, density in a small form factor, higher performance and lower energy, and compelling RAS features,” Graham continues.

  • Reply to

    Why Intel will spend $16.7 billion on Altera

    by wallisweaver Aug 28, 2015 10:29 AM
    semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie Aug 28, 2015 10:59 PM Flag

    Programmable chips are thirty years old.

    you're so dumb - I can't believe it

  • semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie Aug 28, 2015 8:58 PM Flag

    Not a bad week for chips considering the circumstances

    From: Cary Salsberg Read Replies (1) of 10920

    As Fisher says, the last leg down and the first leg up are driven by psychology and emotion, not fundamentals

  • semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie Aug 28, 2015 8:02 PM Flag

    So global chip sales are not falling off a cliff after all - and even better the inventory issue has been already addressed.(no surprise in the days of SAP and Oracle)
    But the chart looked so bad - if I recall correctly Fleckenstein was talking about inventories and even saturation - flexibility curve of demand - the lower the cost/price of chips the more applications - that's basic economics.... crude moved more 10% within 2 days...not supply and demand ...just traders inflicting huge swings....
    and the SOXX chart looked so bad...some times I wonder.... the chart supposed to look forward but it seems to be trailing

    For 4Q15, IC Insights forecasts that the quarterly pure-play foundry market will show a higher than normal growth rate of 4 percent. With most of the inventory adjustments that held back growth in the first half of the year expected to be completed by the end of 3Q15, 4Q15 is forecast to register enough growth to boost the quarterly pure-play foundry market to over $12.0 billion for the first time

  • The quarterly pure-play IC foundry market has recently displayed a seasonal pattern in which the best growth rate takes place in the second quarter of the year and a sales downturn occurs in the fourth quarter. Given that about 98 percent of pure-play foundries’ sales are to IDMs and fabless companies that will re-sell the devices they purchase from the foundry, it makes sense that the pure-play foundries’ strongest seasonal quarter (second quarter) is one quarter earlier than the total IC industry’s strongest seasonal quarter (third quarter).

    However, as shown in the figure, 2015 is not expected to display the typical pure-play foundry quarterly revenue pattern. Although 1Q15 registered its usual weakness, 2Q15 showed a sequential decline, rather than an increase. In 2012, 2013, and 2014, second quarter pure-play foundry revenue showed strong double-digit growth. In 2Q15, results were decidedly atypical with a 2 percent decline in pure-play foundry sales. The primary reason behind the 2Q15 sales decline was the 5 percent 2Q15/1Q15 revenue decline by foundry giant TSMC. TSMC’s 5 percent sequential decline was equivalent to a $366 million drop in its revenue.

    For 4Q15, IC Insights forecasts that the quarterly pure-play foundry market will show a higher than normal growth rate of 4 percent. With most of the inventory adjustments that held back growth in the first half of the year expected to be completed by the end of 3Q15, 4Q15 is forecast to register enough growth to boost the quarterly pure-play foundry market to over $12.0 billion for the first time.

  • Reply to

    Why Intel will spend $16.7 billion on Altera

    by wallisweaver Aug 28, 2015 10:29 AM
    semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie Aug 28, 2015 3:14 PM Flag

    There must be something ALTR specific because Intel has and had already exposure to FPGA via Achronix

    Continuing its long standing relationship as the first customer of Intel Custom Foundry, Achronix has received process design kits for Intel’s 14nm, 3-D Tri-Gate transistor technology.

    Work on the 14nm FPGA family will occur concurrently with the roll-out of the remaining 22nm Speedster22i FPGAs, the first of which is now shipping to customers. Both generations of Speedster FPGAs are targeted at high bandwidth applications and include hardened interface IP – which increases effective density, lowers overall power consumption and reduces development complexity.

  • semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie Aug 28, 2015 12:14 AM Flag

    ever heard of dramexchange waldo?

  • semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie Aug 28, 2015 12:11 AM Flag

    The DXI index not only reflects the output value of the DRAM industry, it also depicts the stock price changes of DRAM makers. According to statistical data compiled by DRAMeXchange on the stock price of relevant DRAM makers, such as Samsung, SK Hynix, Elpida, Micron, Nanya, Winbond...etc., a strong correlation is seen with the spot price. Therefore, the index provides users with an accurate account of the highly volatile memory business.

    The DXI index not only reflects the output value of the DRAM industry, it also depicts the stock price changes of DRAM makers. According to statistical data compiled by DRAMeXchange on the stock price of relevant DRAM makers, such as Samsung, SK Hynix, Elpida, Micron, Nanya, Winbond...etc., a strong correlation is seen with the spot price. Therefore, the index provides users with an accurate account of the highly volatile memory business.
    The DXI index not only reflects the output value of the DRAM industry, it also depicts the stock price changes of DRAM makers. According to statistical data compiled by DRAMeXchange on the stock price of relevant DRAM makers, such as Samsung, SK Hynix, Elpida, Micron, Nanya, Winbond...etc., a strong correlation is seen with the spot price. Therefore, the index provides users with an accurate account of the highly volatile memory business.

  • semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie Aug 27, 2015 11:37 PM Flag

    and amat, poor amat, 26 in 2004, and still has never gotten back there

    keep jerking yourself up on AMAT - LOL
    LAM = Little Applied Materials
    - I am sure you don't get it blowhead
    LRCX and ASML have done nicely - well above Y2K bubble....wonder why ...
    you just don't comprehend the changes that are going on....

    as Jason Leavitt has said many times,and quite recently, some of the biggest rallies come in down trends with rallies that then fail....
    global IC sales and capex are not falling off the cliff - looks like ASML and LRCX are leading the pack

  • semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie Aug 27, 2015 4:13 PM Flag

    does not change the overall prevailing trend which is down.....
    when the trend (aka chart) changes the easy money has been made -
    a i said I "cover" chip equipment stocks for a long time and not once I looked at a chart though I understand the "chart" has its place ....
    an old post from 4 years ago - back than I realized Lam will be doing great - and they executed extremely well by buying NVLS :
    To: etchmeister who wrote (5841) 4/15/2011 12:47:47 AM
    From: etchmeister of 5855

    * Multipatterning litho schemes driving etch. After prolonged tinkering with multiple patterning (double and more) litho schemes, the industry should finally start truly adopting this technology in 2H11 and 2012. To this end, look for etch to increase as a percentage of wafer fab equipment spending, Muse notes.
    From all equipment analysts I know Muse is probably one of the best - perhaps the best

  • Reply to

    Filthy stock is RED

    by itakebackmyapology Aug 27, 2015 3:02 PM
    semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie Aug 27, 2015 3:52 PM Flag

    though zero content in your posts somewhat "interesting"....keep betting on the same "pattern"....how many times did you get stopped out with a loss?
    3 or 4 times?

  • Reply to

    Every #$%$ Doomsayer with access to a computer

    by lost_my_shorts Aug 27, 2015 11:24 AM
    semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie Aug 27, 2015 11:59 AM Flag

    there are a lot of people that pay a lot attention on charts but are clueless about the semi indusrty and how matters changed - in the days of SAP&Oracle everybody has real time knowledge what's going on with the business including inventories.
    A few days ago I noticed the DXI (memory pricing indicator tracked and published by DramExchange) reversed ..and today's MU's news don't seem so bad afterall.
    LRCX vs AMAT :
    why the difference in outlook
    TSMC, Samsung FinFet is really 20 nm technology and they are able to reuse equipment from 20 nm - HOWEVER what TSMC et al are buying is stuff for multiple patterning - and Lam hit that sweet spot bullseye.
    There is also a pause in front end equipment - the fabs are ramping the equipment and buying backend equipment to assemble the chips - Semicon Taiwan is coming up and Lam has a presentation on advanced packaging. Fleckenstein is a complete failure (the blind pig) - he has nothing learned over the last 20 years...
    but he has his fans - some people like to hear what they want to hear - there are some on this board -
    I also believe BIG money is trying to move charts in a certain way regardless of fundamental and a lot of TA folks jumping on the train
    Monay August 17
    Bill Fleckenstein, the president of Fleckenstein Capital, told CNBC earlier this month, "I'm short semiconductor stocks because there is an inventory correction at a minimum, and there might be saturation,".

    From our technical viewpoint, the SOX has been moving in a bearish ascending wedge chart pattern since July-August of last year. The index broke down the trendline support of the ascending wedge in late June and has pulled back about 16% from the all-time high at 751.21. The death cross, where the 200-day SMA breaks above the 50-day SMA, has now emerged. Hence, there is a major downside risk for the index, to the 545 and 540 levels, if the trendline support of the descending wedge can’t hold.

  • semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie Aug 26, 2015 1:46 PM Flag

    neither global IC sales nor capex are falling 0ff a cliff -
    actually LRCX and ASML upped the outlook -
    these guys have been for a long time in the industry and are not sticking out their heads for nothing

    what wiil be a prolonged down turn. that is no where near over

    who is your source and based on what?
    based on What?
    I don't expect an answer - all I know Intel pushed out 10 nm for six months or so
    ASML has a huge backlog for tools that have a lead time of 9 - 12 months and chipmakers need them badly to reduce cost....some people think "commodities" and these people including you just can't grasp Moore's law

  • semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie Aug 26, 2015 1:14 PM Flag

    fwiw, you could have ...yes could have....blowhead
    you could have sold Intel @ 37 rather $ 20 - I think you're the blind pig someone on the board mentioned - the pig that once in a while finds an acorn

  • semi_equip_junkie by semi_equip_junkie Aug 25, 2015 10:10 PM Flag

    makes sense - GS et al helping to drive the price down.
    It's too odd not giving a cent of credit for the new memory technology that will sample end of year - and afterall DRAM pricing is not falling off a cliff

  • semi_equip_junkie by semi_equip_junkie Aug 25, 2015 1:00 AM Flag

    is up 7.5% - google it

  • semi_equip_junkie by semi_equip_junkie Aug 25, 2015 12:15 AM Flag

    China is faced to cut the consumption of fossil fuels and look for alternatives
    1.) bodes well for technology
    2,) bodes poorly for Koch brothers and crude (

  • Reply to

    Low-priced oil is great for consumers

    by wallisweaver Aug 24, 2015 3:08 PM
    semi_equip_junkie semi_equip_junkie Aug 24, 2015 11:58 PM Flag

    junkie is right, the skies in China are quite polluted.

    LOL -
    they can't even grow a crop....
    bodes well for US AG exports - man has to eat

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