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Nokia Corporation Message Board

sonofcaan 30 posts  |  Last Activity: 10 hours ago Member since: Aug 13, 2012
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  • sonofcaan sonofcaan 10 hours ago Flag

    Nah. Every day's a great day! I just had some time to kill this morning and spent it to spread some truth. FIT has a limited future.

    My final post today. Don't be fitbitter.

    Sentiment: Strong Sell

  • sonofcaan sonofcaan 10 hours ago Flag

    10 Fitbits for every geek (sic) phone? If you meant smartphone, there's billions of those. Each with accelerometers, gyroscopes, gps, some with altimeters and compasses. Each with hundreds of fitness apps to choose from.

    Do you ever notice how many sport arm cases there are in retail? Millions of people use their phones to track their fitness, while remaining connected and able to listen to streaming music, audiobooks and podcasts.

    A Fitbit device provides nothing but data redundancy, locked down in a proprietary system under Fitbit's control. A Fitbit device is an unnecessary waste of money.

    Sentiment: Strong Sell

  • sonofcaan sonofcaan 11 hours ago Flag

    And "smart" would be calling for $700 stock price?

    You're clearly not formally educated, so your dumb/smart barometer is understandably skewed toward thug logic.

    You should read Wikipedia's List of fallacies to see how your emotional verbosity exposes your educational handicaps. Are you in a wellness program?

    Sentiment: Strong Sell

  • sonofcaan sonofcaan 11 hours ago Flag

    Polar, Garmin, Suunto, Apple Watch, Android Wear limit Fitbit to a beginner's toy.

    Fitquitters, too.

    Sentiment: Strong Sell

  • sonofcaan sonofcaan 11 hours ago Flag

    You don't get it if you think I'm for Apple crushing Fitbit into obsolescence. If I have feelings in the game, then they're for real sports watches like Polar, Suunto and Garmin. Fitbit has nothing to serve true endurance athletes, and as such, shouldn't be the choice for those who might one day raise their fitness to a point where they'll need a Polar, Suunto or Garmin device.

    If you begin with Fitbit, your data will remain trapped under their control.

    FIT will go below IPO price within six months. 6 months.

    Sentiment: Strong Sell

  • sonofcaan sonofcaan 11 hours ago Flag

    BTW: Fitbit won't be able to emulate Apple Watch's winning template because they have no software platform with SDKs for 3rd-party app market. Android Wear and Apple Watch will have thousands of app choices to create customisable device experiences...While improving on sensors and battery life, as well as an entire marketplace for watch bands and accessories.

    Sentiment: Strong Sell

  • sonofcaan sonofcaan 11 hours ago Flag

    So it's okay with you that Fitbit owns and controls your data, with no options for export or sharing should you want to try another service? Who else does that?

    What's even worse is Fitbit don't even do this themselves. They use a 3rd-party supplier to house and maintain all their users' data. That was disclosed as a risk factor on their S-1.

    All that work and history, trying to get fitter, and you can't even have a copy in standardised file format. No problem as long as you remain a Fitbit customer.

    Sentiment: Strong Sell

  • sonofcaan sonofcaan 11 hours ago Flag

    So, bumping a thread to the top so its heading keeps getting read is some sort of strategy?

    Huh. You learn something every day.

    Sentiment: Strong Sell

  • From DC Rainmaker's Fitbit Surge review:

    "ON DATA EXPORTING:

    At this time the Fitbit Surge does not officially offer any form of data exporting of your activities, nor of 24×7 HR monitoring (not even with a Premium Account). There is one little tool you can use to somewhat export out your runs, but only the GPS portion and not the HR portion.

    Meanwhile, Fitbit did announce at CES that Strava support is on the way – so that would in theory mean you’ll get at least GPS, and hopefully HR data as well there. Still, given every other product on the market today supports exporting to some form of file from a web control panel, it’s a definite downside to the Surge lacking any way at all to do that.

    While Fitbit might have been able to get away with the walled garden approach in past years, the market is simply too competitive these days for that plan of action. Hopefully they’ll make it easier for people to access and save their own data."

    Apple critics use the term "walled-garden" exhaustingly. However, any fitness data you have that feeds into Apple's Health app can be exported and shared with whomever you choose, anytime. Fitbit refuses to play along and your data remains with Fitbit. No 3rd party analytics, no bringing your history with you if you want to switch to an alternative tracking service. Fitbit have you trapped in their garden.

    Sentiment: Strong Sell

  • Reply to

    Corporate Wellness anchored by Fitbit

    by fitbeat 14 hours ago
    sonofcaan sonofcaan 13 hours ago Flag

    Corporate wellness as a term ain't gonna last and your interpretation of it, and its future, sounds maniacally Orwellian.

    Sentiment: Strong Sell

  • sonofcaan sonofcaan 13 hours ago Flag

    Bulky, right. The Surge weighs more than the 42mm Sport and has a monstrous, asymmetrical profile that sticks out on your wrist by a 1/2 inch. Surge has one permanently-fixed wide band, married to one of three colours. The UI looks like it came from the 1990's and there are no accessories for personalisation. With the Surge, you get the look that comes out of the box to go with every occasion, 24 hours a day, for years. All for the low, low price of $250.

  • sonofcaan sonofcaan 13 hours ago Flag

    ... and : You didn't actually read my post.

  • sonofcaan sonofcaan 13 hours ago Flag

    Copied fromFitBit's S-1:

    RISKS RELATED TO OUR BUSINESS
    We operate in a highly competitive market. If we do not compete effectively, our prospects, operating results, and financial condition could be adversely affected.
    The connected health and fitness devices market is highly competitive, with companies offering a variety of competitive products and services. We expect competition in our market to intensify in the future as new and existing competitors introduce new or enhanced products and services that are potentially more competitive than our products and services. The connected health and fitness devices market has a multitude of participants, including specialized consumer electronics companies, such as Garmin, Jawbone, and Misfit, and traditional health and fitness companies, such as adidas and Under Armour. In addition, many large, broad-based consumer electronics companies either compete in our market or adjacent markets or have announced plans to do so, including Apple, Google, LG, Microsoft, and Samsung. For example, Apple has recently introduced the Apple Watch smartwatch, with broad-based functionalities, including some health and fitness tracking capabilities. We may also face competition from manufacturers of lower-cost devices, such as Xiaomi and its Mi Band device. In addition, we compete with a wide range of stand-alone health and fitness-related mobile apps that can be purchased or downloaded through mobile app stores. We believe many of our competitors and potential competitors have significant competitive advantages, including longer operating histories, ability to leverage their sales efforts and marketing expenditures across a broader portfolio of products and services, larger and broader customer bases, more established relationships with a larger number of suppliers, contract manufacturers, and channel partners, greater brand recognition, ability to leverage app stores which they may operate, and greater financial, research and development,

  • You can't see the forest for the trees by focusing on Apple Watch and not the category. That category, "Connected Smartwatches" may not have had much traction before the Apple Watch, but now Samsung and all the others have a winning template (Apple Watch) to iterate upon, primarily with Android Wear and lesser with Tizen, Pebble and others. Improvements will come steadily with better sensors and battery life and apps will further define and enhance them. With the right smartwatch(es), Fitbits will have no place alongside them; They don't now and certainly won't in a year or two.

    No one who spends $250 and up on a smartwatch will buy a Fitbit at any price, because Fitbits provide merely redundant data within a locked-down, proprietary ecosystem with no alternatives for analytics. Redundant data to a smartwatch and redundant data to a smartphone, it's an unnecessary appliance and a waste of money.

    All that without mentioning hardcore sports watches that serious athletes choose from Polar, Garmin and Suunto. Serious marathoners, triathletes, swimmers, and cyclists (and those who want you to think that they are) would never buy a Fitbit over Polar, Garmin and Suunto. And many of your current Fitbit Surge owners will have an eye on them for replacement or upgrade.

    Sentiment: Strong Sell

  • Reply to

    Declining margins not expected to improve FY2015

    by sonofcaan Aug 30, 2015 2:23 AM
    sonofcaan sonofcaan Aug 30, 2015 10:00 AM Flag

    Wrong board to discuss without relating to FIT.

    But, no. Apple Watch has exclusive features, primarily the only watch capable of running iOS apps. Apple have the strictest pricing guidelines; You never see discounts on new Apple products. iPhones enjoy the highest ASPs of any smartphone, so its customers expect to pay full price.

  • Reply to

    Declining margins not expected to improve FY2015

    by sonofcaan Aug 30, 2015 2:23 AM
    sonofcaan sonofcaan Aug 30, 2015 4:21 AM Flag

    Nokia, just a few years ago, dominated the World in mobile. They were disrupted from above and below their market bracket, squeezing their margins hard. They failed. HTC was once Android's golden child and never stopped making best-in-class devices while their margins have been squeezed so hard, they're barely hanging on. Samsung mobile is facing similar pressure now.

    Fitbit's ASP says a lot about the recent stock price decline. FIT are trying to buy market share with discounted prices. $88 ASP with a lineup range of $75-$250 isn't expected to change in 2015. You're dealing with very thrifty customers.

  • "Fitbit (NYSE:FIT) tumbled after the maker of wearable fitness tracking devices, said margins dropped in the second quarter and projects margins will not improve for the remainder of the year."

    Average selling price (ASP) was $88. This suggests higher end Fitbits aren't selling well or that devices are being sold at steep discounts to MSRPs.

    Why are margins so tight and ASP so low? Competition. That's not going away.

  • sonofcaan sonofcaan Aug 29, 2015 7:13 PM Flag

    Search term: "Fitbit abandonment".

  • Reply to

    FIT's concern isn't Apple Watch, but...

    by sonofcaan Aug 29, 2015 4:48 PM
    sonofcaan sonofcaan Aug 29, 2015 7:04 PM Flag

    I failed to mention FIT's biggest concern. It's not from competitors, it's from tired users. There's been plenty of articles written about Fitbit's users losing interest within weeks or months of purchase. Just like gym memberships, most stop using them for various reasons. They may not ever get started or stop using when approaching or completing their goals. Since Fitbits do only health metrics, there's no reason to keep wearing one if/when they lose their priorities for improved health. Abandonment, not loyalty, is more common with health-exclusive tech. FIT are doomed.

  • Reply to

    FIT's concern isn't Apple Watch, but...

    by sonofcaan Aug 29, 2015 4:48 PM
    sonofcaan sonofcaan Aug 29, 2015 5:29 PM Flag

    Decades of dominance? What, on a name and 3-axis accelerometer?

    FIT needs a differentiator, which it doesn't have. It needs to protect its brand cache with constant innovation, which it doesn't have. It needs a family of apps and strategic partnerships, which it doesn't have.

NOK
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