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Prana Biotechnology Limited Message Board

soundsgood02 203 posts  |  Last Activity: 15 hours ago Member since: Jul 26, 2002
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  • soundsgood02 soundsgood02 15 hours ago Flag

    A substantial contract for a microcap like mgna.

  • soundsgood02 soundsgood02 16 hours ago Flag

    ..this is the nesdi program...the 800 foot cruiser the probable ship to be cutted with magnegas after a little delay to modify the gas...

    Urgent Need for New Technologies
    At least eight submarines are to be dismantled at
    PSNS&IMF by 2016. Larger ships also are scheduled to be
    dismantled in the near future—the ex-USS Long Beach
    (CGN 9), an 800-foot cruiser beginning in 2013, and the
    aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) to begin in 2018.

  • soundsgood02 soundsgood02 17 hours ago Flag

    ..and actual enclosures available for Navy can't be used for the big ship to dismantle this year...so the propane operation cost is huge...big possibilty for magnegas ...101 do you agree with this?

  • soundsgood02 soundsgood02 17 hours ago Flag

    from the navy fact sheet:
    The success of MagneGas will be ranked on the following criteria: 1) Similar or faster than the cutting speed of propane; 2) Below 20 percent opacity; 3) Equal or lower than the Operations and Maintenance cost of supplying propane.

    The price is very important for Navy...but the operations and mantenance of propane are not so low...it's not only the cost of the gas...

    Initially installed in 2009, the tension fabric tents (enclo-
    sures) are just large enough to sufficiently envelop the
    sections of submarines. Their exhaust systems actively
    capture PM emissions (or smoke). However, the enclo-
    sures preclude the use of cranes, and are vulnerable to
    wind damage. It takes up to six minutes for the PMs
    generated by working torches to be captured before
    enclosures can be open again for transport of workers
    and substrates. PSNS&IMF has spent up to $2.5M in one
    year on the outdoor tensile fabric enclosures and its asso-
    ciated infrastructure equipment, including smoke collec-
    tors, vent ducting, and crane rails.
    These enclosures
    cannot be used for much larger surface ships, and the site
    personnel do not anticipate the availability of financial
    resources in the near future to fund customized orders for
    nuclear cruisers or carriers.

  • soundsgood02 soundsgood02 Apr 15, 2014 10:01 AM Flag

    From MGNA sec filings:

    The U. S. Navy has been working with us to explore both the use of MagneGas™ for metal working and the use of the Plasma Arc Flow system for liquid waste processing. The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences, a testing contractor for the U.S. Navy, completed testing of MagneGas™ as an environmentally-friendly alternative for major metal cutting projects, particularly to reduce emissions during the breakup and recycling of retiring vessels. The final written report compared seven methods and gases for metal cutting to find the lowest opacity and showed MagneGas™ as one of the only two methods with positive results. The Company has developed a gas without Carbon Monoxide to meet the Navy standards for this project. On November 1, 2013 the Navy accepted the specifications of this gas and requested onsite testing which occurred in December 2013. The Company is now working with the Navy on MagneGas pricing for a ship demolition project in Washington.

  • Since Oxy-fuel torches are also the globally dominant technology for large-scale metal-cutting for public and private companies alike, more organizations will likely be affected by more stringent environmental regulations, enforcement and good environmental stewardship, making the tool developed good potential for commercial use. As submarines are among the toughest structures to dismantle due to type of material and thicknesses, any system designed to efficiently cut a submarine hull will, in turn, work on any other Navy hull or commercial ship application. With the growing popularity in recycling and conscientious environmental stewardship, metal cutting work is expected to increase. Further, commercial potential can be realized in similar type metal cutting operations that go beyond shipbreaking. As air quality regulations become stricter, any large-scale metal cutting facility or installation may become potential customers for alternative metal cutting techniques.

    REFERENCES:
    1. Naval Safety Center Success Stories: Super-Saw. 11 April 2011. Accessed 16 March, 2012.

    2. Paulson, Kathleen, et al. "Initiation Decision Report: Innovative Technologies to Control/Reduce Emissions from Metal Cutting Operations." NAVFAC Technical Report TR-2368-EV. Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NAVFAC ESC), October 2011.

    3. Nijkerk, Alfred A. & W.L. Dalmijn. Handbook of Recycling Techniques. The Hague, Netherlands: Nijkerk Consultancy, 1998.

    4. Sarkisov, Ashot A. & A.T. Du Clos. Analysis of Risks Associated with Nuclear Hull Decommissioning. Disarmament Technologies, Vol. 24. Dordrect, Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1999.

    5. "NESDI Program Evaluates Technologies to Address Puget Opacity Limits"; CURRENTS Magazine, Summer 2012, 7 pages.

  • Reply to

    CEO taks on blog talk radio...

    by golfisgreatlikeme Apr 13, 2014 6:32 PM
    soundsgood02 soundsgood02 Apr 14, 2014 12:41 PM Flag

    .."Despite the refineries are working from 8 a.m. to midnight"...

  • Reply to

    110k @ $1.51 on the bid!

    by scottstacia Apr 11, 2014 3:51 PM
    soundsgood02 soundsgood02 Apr 11, 2014 4:09 PM Flag

    Raised from $1,49 to 1,53 at the close...

  • Reply to

    Very Nice SA Blog on MNGA

    by jrzbiz Apr 9, 2014 9:40 AM
    soundsgood02 soundsgood02 Apr 10, 2014 6:50 AM Flag

    "Recently uploaded documents from the U.S. Navy show that the Puget Sound Opacity Limitation is forcing the government's hand with opacity emissions standards that Magnegas can definitely meet. It is believed that Magnegas could be on the verge of signing a major contract to meet the needs of the Navy."

  • Reply to

    Toups Tech, 1998 Santilli paper

    by neilnoj Apr 9, 2014 1:58 PM
    soundsgood02 soundsgood02 Apr 9, 2014 6:40 PM Flag

    Last EarthFirst Technologies sec filing in 2007...

    The Company is involved in litigation with Ruggero Maria Santilli ("Santilli"), The Institute for Basic Research, Inc. and Hadronic Press, Inc. ("Hadronic") concerning certain aspects of the Company's liquid waste technologies. Hadronic claims to own the intellectual property rights to one or more aspects of our liquid waste technologies. Management continues to believe that the Company owns all of the intellectual property rights necessary to commercialize and further develop its liquid and solid waste technologies without resorting to a license from any third parties. During 2004, the Company attempted to reach agreement with Santilli and his related parties to resolve the differences between the parties. As of this date, the parties are continuing their efforts to resolve their differences. This litigation does not involve the technology the Company is developing in connection with its efforts for the processing of used automotive tires.

    Sentiment: Buy

  • soundsgood02 soundsgood02 Apr 9, 2014 4:22 PM Flag

    Primary Examiner: Diamond; Alan ~ Attorney, Agent or Firm: LaPointe; Dennis G. Mason Law, P.A.

    Description ~

    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

    The present invention is dramatically more efficient than those disclosed in prior art, such as U.S. Pat. Nos. 603,058 to H. Eldridge; 5,159,900 to W. A. Dammann and D. Wallman; 5,435,274 to W. H. Richardson, Jr.; 5,417,817 to W. A. Dammann and D. Wailman; 5,692,459 to W. H. Richardson, Jr.; 5,792,325 to W. H. Richardson, Jr.

    The processes as per the latter prior art patents have the following main drawbacks which have prevented their being suitable for industrial and consumer applications: 1) the gas produced is environmentally unacceptable, because, according to numerous measurements, its exhaust contains 4% to 8% more carbon dioxide than fossil fuel exhaust; and 2) the gas produced is industrially unacceptable, because, also according to various measurements, its production rate is excessively slow due to the burning by the arc of the hydrogen and oxygen back to water, as illustrated by the typical large glow of underwater arcs.

  • U.S. Class 422/186.21 ~ Intl. Cl.B01J 019/08 ~ April 1, 2003

    Santilli; Ruggero Maria (Palm Harbor, FL)


    Abstract ~

    Reactors for the total recycling of contaminated liquid waste, which produce a clean burning combustible gas, usable heat, and solid precipitates. Different embodiments include the efficient recycling of automotive antifreeze and oil waste, a new method for the production of a fuel from crude oil, for desalting seawater and for recycling biologically contaminated liquid waste, such as town sewage, into a clean burning combustible gas, nutrient rich water useful for irrigation, and solid precipitates useful for fertilizers.

    References Cited ~
    U.S. Patent Documents:
    603058 ~ Apr., 1898 ~ Eldridge et al.
    3992277 ~ Nov., 1976 ~ Trieschmann et al. ~ 204/172
    4054513 ~ Oct., 1977 ~ Windle ~ 209/214
    4229307 ~ Oct., 1980 ~ Lowe et al. ~ 250/543
    4369102 ~ Jan., 1983 ~ Galluzzo et al. ~ 204/228
    5026484 ~ Jun., 1991 ~ Juvan ~ 210/717
    5069765 ~ Dec., 1991 ~ Lewis ~ 204/173
    5159900 ~ Nov., 1992 ~ Dammann
    5319176 ~ Jun., 1994 ~ Alvi et al. ~ 219/121
    5417817 ~ May., 1995 ~ Dammann et al.
    5435274 ~ Jul., 1995 ~ Richardson, Jr.
    5692459 ~ Dec., 1997 ~ Richardson, Jr.
    5792325 ~ Aug., 1998 ~ Richardson, Jr.
    5826548 ~ Oct., 1998 ~ Richardson, Jr. ~ 123/3
    6113748 ~ Sep., 2000 ~ Richardson, Jr. ~ 204/170
    6183604 ~ Feb., 2001 ~ Santilli ~ 204/172
    6299656 ~ Oct., 2001 ~ Richardson, Jr. et al. ~ 44/603

    David Braaten, `Ridiculously` easy test yields claim of energy triumph, The Washington Times, p. A5, Mar. 1989.*
    Wada et al., Nuclear Fusion in Solid, Japanese Journal of Applied Physics, vol. 28, No. 11, p. L2017-L2020, Nov. 1990.*
    Kim, Neutron Burst From a High-Voltage Discharge Between Palladium Electrodes in D2(sub) Gas, Fusion Technology, vol. 18, p. 680-681, Dec. 1990.*
    Foundations of Hadronic Chemistry with Applications to New Clean Energies and Fuels by Ruggero Maria Santilli, (Date Unknown).

  • Reply to

    Just saw this: Potential article coming

    by sharptrove Apr 9, 2014 3:05 PM
    soundsgood02 soundsgood02 Apr 9, 2014 3:33 PM Flag

    Here's a key excerpt from the 2013 financial results: "The U.S. Navy continues to be interested in MagneGas fuel for metal cutting applications such as in the decommissioning of ships and the Company has provided additional testing data as requested. The Navy requested fuel pricing for a ship demolition project and the Company is awaiting feedback."

    It seems the U.S. Navy as is the case with the U.S. Government is trying to find ways to promote and use green technology. This will be a big one for MagneGas. If the U.S. Navy contracts with MagneGas then the share price will likely revalue higher, by all accounts it looks like this decision will happen relatively soon. At this point it seems that the Navy wants to order. Investors may see an order like this as validation of MagneGas technology.

  • Reply to

    Toups Tech, 1998 Santilli paper

    by neilnoj Apr 9, 2014 1:58 PM
    soundsgood02 soundsgood02 Apr 9, 2014 3:19 PM Flag

    2013...
    The Company has developed a gas without Carbon Monoxide to meet the Navy standards for this project. On November 1, 2013 the Navy accepted the specifications of this gas and requested onsite testing which occurred in December 2013.

  • Reply to

    Just saw this: Potential article coming

    by sharptrove Apr 9, 2014 3:05 PM
    soundsgood02 soundsgood02 Apr 9, 2014 3:16 PM Flag

    ..Thanks...Another positive article about mnga ..

  • soundsgood02 soundsgood02 Apr 9, 2014 12:46 PM Flag

    ..repetita iuvant..from sec filings...

    ..The final written report compared seven methods and gases for metal cutting to find the lowest opacity and showed MagneGas™ as one of the only two methods with positive results. The Company has developed a gas without Carbon Monoxide to meet the Navy standards for this project. On November 1, 2013 the Navy accepted the specifications of this gas and requested onsite testing which occurred in December 2013. The Company is now working with the Navy on MagneGas pricing for a ship demolition project in Washington.

  • soundsgood02 soundsgood02 Apr 8, 2014 6:52 AM Flag

    Conclusion
    NAVFAC ESC recognizes that the
    current use of enclosures to contain
    visible particulate emissions from oxy-
    fuel and plasma arc cutting technolo-
    gies is the best, immediate response to
    avoid any future opacity limit violations.
    This solution will temporarily allow for
    the continued regularity of work on
    submarines. However, PSNS&IMF will
    ultimately need a new cutting protocol
    comprising alternative cutting technolo-
    gies for the long-term. The last cruiser
    will soon arrive for recycling, followed
    by carriers. An aircraft carrier is about
    15 times larger than a submarine—it
    would be extremely expensive and
    laborious to customize and fit an enclo-
    sure for it. Therefore a cold cutting tech-
    nology or a hot cutting technology with
    opacity that is significantly lower than
    for currently used oxy-fuel technologies
    will need to be identified to justify
    outdoor cutting activity. In short, the
    final cutting protocol will need to
    comprise both hot and cold technolo-
    gies to both maintain regularity of work
    flow and prevent ongoing violation of
    the PSCAA opacity limit.

  • soundsgood02 soundsgood02 Apr 8, 2014 6:47 AM Flag

    Three primary criteria guided the investigation:
    1. Limit visible PM emissions to the environment
    2. Maintain or increase cutting efficiency
    3. Ensure worker safety
    Options to address the first criterion can include
    containing the emissions (e.g., working within enclo-
    sures) and preventing emissions via other fuels or
    cutting technologies.
    Characteristics required of alternative technologies
    to meet the first two criteria include:
    Capacity to cut either HY80 high-tensile steel or
    stainless steel
    Kerf width (cutting width) of at least 3/4-inch
    Opacity below the limit set by PSCAA and also
    lower than the norm of oxy-propane torch cutting

  • NESDI Program Evaluates Technologies to
    Address Puget Opacity Limits

    Urgent Need for New Technologies

    At least eight submarines are to be dismantled at
    PSNS&IMF by 2016. Larger ships also are scheduled to be
    dismantled in the near future—the ex-USS Long Beach
    (CGN 9), an 800-foot cruiser beginning in 2013, and the
    aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) to begin in 2018.
    Several Navy organizations associated
    with ship disposal have voiced their
    support for demonstrating new tech-
    nologies because they recognize the
    urgency involved. As Kurt Doehnert,
    Naval Sea System Command, stated,
    “This NESDI project is critical for main-
    taining environmental compliance and
    addressing the opacity abatement
    problem for the Ship Inactivation and
    Recycling program at PSNSY&IMF. This
    project is especially vital, timely and
    relevant given the upcoming significant
    ship recycling workload at PSNSY&IMF,
    particularly for application to the extra-
    ordinary opacity abatement challenges
    that will be presented by the ex-Long
    Beach and ex-Enterprise.

  • soundsgood02 soundsgood02 Apr 7, 2014 12:42 PM Flag

    ..It seems that Navy want to order...And the company won't lose this huge validation contract...

PRAN
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