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Boston Scientific Corporation Message Board

stinkystinky1 85 posts  |  Last Activity: Nov 11, 2006 11:36 PM Member since: May 4, 2005
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  • Reply to

    MORE CRASHING FOR BSX NEXT WEEK

    by timber_look_out_below Sep 2, 2005 3:37 PM
    stinkystinky1 stinkystinky1 Nov 11, 2006 11:36 PM Flag

    Note: Aside from the fact that the company is falling apart and the insiders are dumping, the FDA warning and patients dying etc


    Taxus sales plummeting as patients and doctors see continued scientific trials showing superiority of Cypher. The only thing keeping Taxus in the game at all is their dropping prices (also hurts net) and lack of supply of Cypher. When Cypher supply cathches up Taxus will be in teens in market share.


    This rampant corporate keptomania is really disgusting all the insider sales. Best legalized theft game ever engineered as a tool to pick the pockets of the stakeholders, bar none. There sure are a bunch of novice sheep on many of these boards who are going to get sheared again.


    They will have to lower estimates again or miss estimates because of declining sales of Crapus, oops Taxus, higher acquisition-related costs, and a decline in the market share.


    http://stockcharts.com/def/servlet/SC.web?c=bsx,uu[w,a]daclyyay[df][pb50!b200!f][vc60][iUb14!Ld20]&pref=G


    BSX no longer sells the Glidewire,glidecath or pinnacle sheaths? I know it is not as glamorous as Coronary stents but it will affect the bottom line.



    BSX will lose the truemo glidewire and glidecath business by the early part of next year, these devices are the nuts and bolts of both coronary and peripheral procedures. They provide leverage in negotiating whether a lab will be boston or cordis. W/O this line JNJ has more to offer in bulk contracting to hospitals, especially since they add the product line of GDT into the mix. Aquisition of materials are the greatest cost concern to an insitiution, and the ability to reduce them is a powerful sales tool. Also, the addition of Abbott Vascular, MDT and start-up Connor Medical into the DES space will reduce margins, and market share. Unfortunately BSX does not have any organically developing assets to reverse this,

  • stinkystinky1 by stinkystinky1 Oct 22, 2006 10:27 PM Flag

    This is a LOSER. All the long pumping losers can post all the BS they want but the stock chart and insider selling speaks for itself. The truth about the scam of Taxus and all the mismanagement, theft of intellectual property, breaching contracts (Medinol), scamming data sets from their trials, hiding defective sticking and deflation product defects (killing patients), distorting earning projections and overall lack of integrity is finally catching up. The slide is NOT over!!
    The debt is growing as are interest rates, they continue to waste money like water, miss estimates, and lose market share, now new and better competitors are about to eat BSX lunch.
    This company is going to fall apart quickly, and this price is going to look like the yearly high soon. All in my opinion but I have been right for a long time, and anyone listening to me has saved themselves a lot.

    Studies Give Edge To J&J Stent
    Matthew Herper, 08.16.05, 4:00 PM ET

    NEW YORK - Johnson & Johnson has a better product than its rival, Boston Scientific, for holding open clogged arteries.Studies Give Edge To J&J Stent
    Matthew Herper, 08.16.05, 4:00 PM ET

    NEW YORK - Johnson & Johnson has a better product than its rival, Boston Scientific, for holding open clogged arteries.

    New data published in the two leading medical journals indicates that patients who receive Cypher, a drug-coated stent made by Johnson & Johnson (nyse: JNJ - news - people ),is less likely to need a repeat surgery than those who get Taxus, a rival stent from Boston Scientific (nyse: BSX - news - people ).

    That's more bad news for Boston Scientific, amid concerns over its over-reliance on drug-coated stents.

    "There is a difference," says David J. Moliterno, a cardiologist at the University of Kentucky who wrote an editorial on the studies in The New England Journal of Medicine.
    For all patients taken as a group, Moliterno says, those who receive Taxus are more likely to need their procedure redone than those who receive Cypher.

    High-risk patients, such as those with diabetes, fare better with the Cypher stent, he says.

    Samin Sharma, a cardiologist at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, says most doctors would opt to use Cypher if it weren't for manufacturing problems that can make the device harder for doctors to get. He notes that the evidence is consistent that Cypher is better at preventing arteries from reclogging.

    The researchers found that patients receiving Cypher were at much lower risk of having their arteries reclose than those who received Taxus. The results are published in the current issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association. Says Firth, "I think the value of this product from a health economics standpoint is very clearly demonstrated."

  • Reply to

    BSX IS A LOSER WORTH $6 SELL FAST

    by dexter_egghead Oct 18, 2006 4:52 PM
    stinkystinky1 stinkystinky1 Oct 22, 2006 10:27 PM Flag

    PDATE 3-Boston Scientific shipping problems 'serious' -FDA
    (Adds details and background throughout, updates shares to close)
    By Susan Heavey

    WASHINGTON, (Reuters) - Boston Scientific Corp.'s (BSX.N: Quote, Profile, Research) distribution process has "serious" problems that allowed flawed medical devices to be shipped, including its Taxus drug-coated stent, U.S. regulators said in a letter made public on Tuesday.

    FDA inspectors said the company failed to properly monitor products so that only acceptable devices were distributed, according to the letter.
    The warning, which also targeted the device maker's Vaxcel chest ports and Symmetry catheter, is the latest setback for the device maker after a string of manufacturing-related product recalls and other FDA warnings.

    The company's shares, which have underperformend the S&P 500 by 28 percent since January, closed down 4.53 percent, or $1.23, to $25.92 on the New York Stock Exchange.
    Yet industry analysts said Tuesday's letter did renew worries about the beleaguered medical device sector, which has been hit hard during the last year with a series of manufacturing-related problems, they said.

    "We do not dispute that some of these mistakes occurred," Rudnick said. "We're working on the process issues."

    The latest FDA warning letter followed an inspection of Boston Scientific's Quincy, Massachusetts, shipping facility.

    Agency inspectors said the company did not have adequate management oversight to review quality and "failed to implement procedures to assure that only devices approved for release are distributed."

    It also did not properly document corrective actions or review data that could help pinpoint problems.

    "On a number of occasions, your firm shipped medical devices that were not considered acceptable for release," it said. The letter did not mention any impact on patients and an FDA spokeswoman was not available for comment.

    One over one hundred Taxus heart stents that failed a quality test were sent to hospitals. The FDA also said the company shipped five Vaxcel units on three different dates after they were recalled in August 2004.

    Boston Scientific initially responded to the FDA's concerns with a June 20 letter offering its commitment to improving its quality controls, the latest warning said. But the agency said that was insufficient.

    "Your response does not identify how and when you plan to implement significant, broad-based corrective actions, nor does it provide sufficient evidence to establish that you have made real changes to your current quality system," the FDA said.

    Last year, Boston Scientific recalled 99,000 Taxus stents after reports of malfunctions.

    Ryan Rauch, an analyst with Jefferies & Company Inc., said the FDA was not likely to force injunction against the Taxus devices because it would cut the U.S. supply. But he added that the warning highlighted sector woes.

    A.G. Edwards analyst Jan Wald said Boston Scientific's inadequate response to the FDA was a concern.

    "It sounds like there's more work to do for Boston Scientific."

  • Reply to

    AAPL is WORTH 50!

    by stock_tanker Sep 16, 2006 11:36 PM
    stinkystinky1 stinkystinky1 Sep 17, 2006 12:24 AM Flag

    Your being awfully generous arn't you? I see a gap that needs to be filled at $20.
    The fashionable iPod has made Apple Computer beloved on Wall Street. But its success masks an erosion in the company's profitability.

    Apple has a worrisome downward trend in profitability. Apple's computer business, which contributes 45% of sales, has a gross margin of 12%, estimates Eugene Munster of Piper Jaffray; the iPod, with a 33% share of sales, has a margin of only 06%. The other businesses linked to the iPod do little more than break even, analysts estimate: The iTunes Music Store earns at most 4 cents pretax on each 99-cent download for Apple, and iPod videos, which sell for $1.99, have a similar margin.

    Apple's iPod and music businesses are growing much faster than its computer business. Last year sales of iPods rose 48% , and sales of iPod services and accessories, like repairs and car chargers, rose 23%. But computer sales were up only 03%.

    It is highly likely under these circumstances that Apple's overall gross profit margin will decline. Apple has been steadily lowering the average selling price of its pocket players, from $415 in 2001 to $188 last quarter. Says analyst Munster: "The newer markets for the iPod are more price sensitive."

    Apple declines to discuss the profitability of the different versions of the iPod. But in its financial statements the company says that it expects price competition to put pressure on gross margins for all consumer electronics industries and "especially for the iPod product line." Aiming to stay two steps ahead of its rivals, Apple competes with itself. It stretched the first six iPod models out over two years but the last eight over only eight months. (Currently available are the Shuffle, the Nano and the video player.) This planned obsolescence has reduced the amount of time the company has to recoup its development costs on each product. The Nano, released in September 2005, has the lowest gross margin of any iPod, says Munster--about 18%.

    Several of the 15 analysts on Apple (a group that includes Munster) say the company could increase its profitability by cutting costs. But this is going to be hard to do. Apple has already reduced spending on research and development from 8% of sales in 2003 to 4% last year. In contrast, Creative Technology, number two in the MP3 market, with a 14% share globally, spends 7% of sales on R&D, as does Sony Corp. Apple's overhead and selling costs have fallen from 20% of sales to 13% the past two years, well below Creative's and Sony's. And how can Apple cut much more from component costs? Apple has a deal in place through 2010 to get its flash memory from Hynix, Samsung, Intel, Toshiba and Micron. Memory is the most expensive element of the iPod 4GB Nano and accounts for two-thirds of the total parts cost.

    Inspiring the bulls, Apple delivered fourth-quarter 2005 earnings of 50 cents a share, almost double those of the prior year. But 12 cents of those earnings were related to one-time tax shifts. Without that shot in the arm Apple's growth rate would have been half of what it averaged the previous three quarters. According to an analysis by Goldman Sachs, Apple's return on invested capital peaked in the March 2005 quarter at 13.2%. In the September quarter this number fell to 9.7%.

    But once you turn down the hosannas on the music player, you are left with a company with no hammerlock on the technology (Creative holds the patent to the interface for MP3 players) and no unique operational advantages (such as Dell's made-to-order computers).

  • stinkystinky1 by stinkystinky1 May 8, 2006 7:02 PM Flag

    Complete failure. Should be a penny stock, what a loser company.

  • Reply to

    I'm impressed

    by thumps32000 Aug 25, 2005 4:02 PM
    stinkystinky1 stinkystinky1 Mar 19, 2006 9:06 PM Flag

    Prediction: not long before delisted and bk from losses.

  • Reply to

    9 months= (.69) LOSS

    by bosc_stinks Jan 9, 2006 12:31 AM
    stinkystinky1 stinkystinky1 Mar 19, 2006 9:03 PM Flag

    SOON THE DELISTING THEN THE BANKRUPTCY.

  • Reply to

    Al Kcervik says:

    by blubby2000 Jan 22, 2006 11:18 PM
    stinkystinky1 stinkystinky1 Mar 19, 2006 9:02 PM Flag

    Bad news is coming for this overvalued trash. Could be your last chance to bail before penny stock status.

  • Reply to

    BOYCOTT APPLE!

    by dell_rox Jan 20, 2006 11:25 AM
    stinkystinky1 stinkystinky1 Jan 20, 2006 8:45 PM Flag

    The iPod has made Apple Computer beloved on Wall Street. But its success masks an erosion in the company's profitability.

    When margins are tallied, look for shares of Apple Computer to fall as quickly as next quarters estimates.
    There is a worrisome downward trend in profitability. Apple's computer business, which contributes 45% of sales, has a gross margin of 10%, estimates Eugene Munster of Piper Jaffray; the iPod, with a 13% (and rising) share of sales, has a margin of only 20%. The other businesses linked to the iPod do little more than break even, analysts estimate: The iTunes Music Store earns at most 2 cents pretax on each 99-cent download for Apple, and iPod videos, which sell for $1.99, have a similar margin.

    It is highly likely under these circumstances that Apple's overall gross profit margin will decline. Apple has been steadily lowering the average selling price of its pocket players, from $415 in 2001 to $188 last quarter. Says analyst Munster: "The newer markets for the iPod are more price sensitive."

    Apple declines to discuss the profitability of the different versions of the iPod. But in its financial statements the company says that it expects price competition to put pressure on gross margins for all consumer electronics industries and "especially for the iPod product line." Aiming to stay two steps ahead of its rivals, Apple competes with itself. It stretched the first six iPod models out over two years but the last eight over only eight months. This planned obsolescence has reduced the amount of time the company has to recoup its development costs on each product. The Nano, released in September 2005, has the lowest gross margin of any iPod, says Munster--about 8%.

    Several analysts on Apple say the company could increase its profitability by cutting costs. But this is going to be hard to do. Apple has already reduced spending on research and development from 8% of sales in 2003 to 4% last year. In contrast, Creative Technology, number two in the MP3 market, with a 14% share globally, spends 7% of sales on R&D, as does Sony Corp. Apple's overhead and selling costs have fallen from 20% of sales to 13% the past two years, well below Creative's and Sony's. And how can Apple cut much more from component costs? Apple has a deal in place through 2010 to get its flash memory from Hynix, Samsung, Intel, Toshiba and Micron. Memory is the most expensive element of the iPod 4GB Nano and accounts for two-thirds of the total parts cost.

    According to an analysis by Goldman Sachs, Apple's return on invested capital peaked in the March 2005 quarter at 13.2%. In the September quarter this number fell to 9.7%.
    The bulls hope that the introduction of Intel chips into Apple computers this year will drive Apple's share of the personal computer market from its recent 2.0% back toward the 10% it enjoyed 15 years ago. Another hopeful thought: Because only 8% of U.S. households own an iPod, Apple can sell a lot more.

    But once you turn down the hosannas on the music player, you are left with a company with no hammerlock on the technology (Creative holds the patent to the interface for MP3 players) and no unique operational advantages (such as Dell's made-to-order computers).

    its new line of Intel based computers are suffering, mainly due to supply for parts. Intel is having its own issues with delivery of Core Duo processors. With the recent Apple announcement, many of Intel's top tier customers started hounding at the processor giant for parts, questioning why Apple is able to start shipping Core Duo based iMacs while they have to wait for units.

  • Reply to

    Shorts in control - $17 target

    by nostradumusinusa Jan 20, 2006 5:01 PM
    stinkystinky1 stinkystinky1 Jan 20, 2006 5:32 PM Flag

    Finally you are opening your eyes. Its ok still plenty of money to be made by selling and buying back at $20.
    Just follow the leader. Steve Jobs and his crew are selling like crazy. Plenty of overpriced stock options to sell too.
    The worrysome thing is China now owns IBM home computer business. Their people work for next to free. There is no way people are going to buy a $2000 imac when they can get a better faster computer from China for $150.

  • Reply to

    Apple gonna get sued by Burst-shut down

    by mltakur Jan 8, 2006 10:01 PM
    stinkystinky1 stinkystinky1 Jan 20, 2006 5:27 PM Flag

    Apple is about to start losing a lot of money.
    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2003/11/07/your_99c_belong/

  • Reply to

    The end of Apple?

    by Pro_Trader_Dude Jan 8, 2006 10:06 PM
    stinkystinky1 stinkystinky1 Jan 20, 2006 5:23 PM Flag

    Charts say the stock is going sub $50. 13 day moving average didn't hold. 20 day moving average didn't hold.
    50 day won't hold. and 200 day won't hold.
    This is an overpriced bloated piece of garbage sold to the gullable bagholders.
    Intel talk is good for a joke. Big deal, Apple laptops have an Intel chip now, people still aren't going to pay $2,000 for them, you can get a Compaq laptop with an Intel chip for $1,000.

    Apple just isn't creative, they just take old products and add one little feature and try to sell it as a brand new device, does anyone really fall for it ???

  • Reply to

    Apple gonna get sued by Burst-shut down

    by mltakur Jan 8, 2006 10:01 PM
    stinkystinky1 stinkystinky1 Jan 14, 2006 8:50 PM Flag

    Burst will win the lawsuits but thats just the start of Apples troubles there are countless lawsuits pending and I don't think Apple has much of a chance at this point its being pumped up by paid pumpers so the insiders and analysts can slip out before the downgrades.

  • Reply to

    The real Apple success story

    by biggiantfan99 Jan 13, 2006 9:47 PM
    stinkystinky1 stinkystinky1 Jan 14, 2006 8:48 PM Flag

    Good point. Apple sucks exceedingly so. Expect to see major tankage after earnings if not before.

  • Reply to

    IF YOU CAN'T..........

    by downtheroad01 Jan 3, 2006 3:23 PM
    stinkystinky1 stinkystinky1 Jan 3, 2006 6:53 PM Flag

    Ha ha thanks making me laugh, funniest thing i heard all day. This is eternal dead money.

  • Reply to

    stink news

    by boulder_56 Dec 30, 2005 5:43 PM
    stinkystinky1 stinkystinky1 Dec 30, 2005 5:54 PM Flag

    My point is the effects of restinosis are not known yet. If it is found that Taxus leaves patients that where not killed at first by its use, later die from restinosis problems then BSX may be liable for lawsuits later that could affect the stock price in the future.
    Anyway, perhaps Tobin and his crew can steal a few more pattents to keep the company out of Bankruptcy until they get busted by the courts again.
    Labeling change also bad news labeling has been changed with the taxus stent...fda labeling change makes very clear that overlapping taxus stents could result in non-q wave mi's and risks should outweigh benefits. stents are overlapped all day long. because of our letigious society....this could really spook docs.

  • Reply to

    Largest Independent Study: Taxus Wins!

    by maztine222 Nov 29, 2005 1:00 PM
    stinkystinky1 stinkystinky1 Dec 30, 2005 5:14 PM Flag

    Studies Give Edge To J&J Stent
    Matthew Herper, 08.16.05, 4:00 PM ET

    NEW YORK - Johnson & Johnson has a better product than its rival, Boston Scientific, for holding open clogged arteries.Studies Give Edge To J&J Stent
    Matthew Herper, 08.16.05, 4:00 PM ET

    NEW YORK - Johnson & Johnson has a better product than its rival, Boston Scientific, for holding open clogged arteries.

    New data published in the two leading medical journals indicates that patients who receive Cypher, a drug-coated stent made by Johnson & Johnson (nyse: JNJ - news - people ),is less likely to need a repeat surgery than those who get Taxus, a rival stent from Boston Scientific (nyse: BSX - news - people ).

    That's more bad news for Boston Scientific, amid concerns over its over-reliance on drug-coated stents.

    "There is a difference," says David J. Moliterno, a cardiologist at the University of Kentucky who wrote an editorial on the studies in The New England Journal of Medicine.
    For all patients taken as a group, Moliterno says, those who receive Taxus are more likely to need their procedure redone than those who receive Cypher.

    High-risk patients, such as those with diabetes, fare better with the Cypher stent, he says.

    Samin Sharma, a cardiologist at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, says most doctors would opt to use Cypher if it weren't for manufacturing problems that can make the device harder for doctors to get. He notes that the evidence is consistent that Cypher is better at preventing arteries from reclogging.

    The researchers found that patients receiving Cypher were at much lower risk of having their arteries reclose than those who received Taxus. The results are published in the current issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association. Says Firth, "I think the value of this product from a health economics standpoint is very clearly demonstrated."

  • Reply to

    This company is a total disaster

    by dead_patients_tell_no_tales Aug 24, 2005 10:06 PM
    stinkystinky1 stinkystinky1 Dec 30, 2005 5:12 PM Flag

    PDATE 3-Boston Scientific shipping problems 'serious' -FDA
    (Adds details and background throughout, updates shares to close)
    By Susan Heavey

    WASHINGTON, (Reuters) - Boston Scientific Corp.'s (BSX.N: Quote, Profile, Research) distribution process has "serious" problems that allowed flawed medical devices to be shipped, including its Taxus drug-coated stent, U.S. regulators said in a letter made public on Tuesday.

    FDA inspectors said the company failed to properly monitor products so that only acceptable devices were distributed, according to the letter.
    The warning, which also targeted the device maker's Vaxcel chest ports and Symmetry catheter, is the latest setback for the device maker after a string of manufacturing-related product recalls and other FDA warnings.

    The company's shares, which have underperformend the S&P 500 by 28 percent since January, closed down 4.53 percent, or $1.23, to $25.92 on the New York Stock Exchange.
    Yet industry analysts said Tuesday's letter did renew worries about the beleaguered medical device sector, which has been hit hard during the last year with a series of manufacturing-related problems, they said.

    "We do not dispute that some of these mistakes occurred," Rudnick said. "We're working on the process issues."

    The latest FDA warning letter followed an inspection of Boston Scientific's Quincy, Massachusetts, shipping facility.

    Agency inspectors said the company did not have adequate management oversight to review quality and "failed to implement procedures to assure that only devices approved for release are distributed."

    It also did not properly document corrective actions or review data that could help pinpoint problems.

    "On a number of occasions, your firm shipped medical devices that were not considered acceptable for release," it said. The letter did not mention any impact on patients and an FDA spokeswoman was not available for comment.

    One over one hundred Taxus heart stents that failed a quality test were sent to hospitals. The FDA also said the company shipped five Vaxcel units on three different dates after they were recalled in August 2004.

    Boston Scientific initially responded to the FDA's concerns with a June 20 letter offering its commitment to improving its quality controls, the latest warning said. But the agency said that was insufficient.

    "Your response does not identify how and when you plan to implement significant, broad-based corrective actions, nor does it provide sufficient evidence to establish that you have made real changes to your current quality system," the FDA said.

    Last year, Boston Scientific recalled 99,000 Taxus stents after reports of malfunctions.

    Ryan Rauch, an analyst with Jefferies & Company Inc., said the FDA was not likely to force injunction against the Taxus devices because it would cut the U.S. supply. But he added that the warning highlighted sector woes.

    A.G. Edwards analyst Jan Wald said Boston Scientific's inadequate response to the FDA was a concern.

    "It sounds like there's more work to do for Boston Scientific."

    This is a LOSER. All the long pumping losers can post all the BS they want but the stock chart and insider selling speaks for itself. The truth about the scam of Taxus and all the mismanagement, theft of intellectual property, breaching contracts (Medinol), scamming data sets from their trials, hiding defective sticking and deflation product defects (killing patients), distorting earning projections and overall lack of integrity is finally catching up. The slide is NOT over!!
    The debt is growing as are interest rates, they continue to waste money like water, miss estimates, and lose market share, now new and better competitors are about to eat BSX lunch.
    This company is going to fall apart quickly, and this price is going to look very expensive soon. All in my opinion but I have been right for a long ti

  • stinkystinky1 stinkystinky1 Dec 30, 2005 5:09 PM Flag

    These jerks are too busy refurbishing their offices to check their quality control apparently. There are a lot of dead people who have been given defective BSX products that should have been recalled sooner. We don't have the data on restinosis yet so many more may die yet.
    U.S. govt warns against Boston Scientific device
    Tue Oct 18, 2005 12:10 AM ET
    NEW YORK, Oct 17 (Reuters) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration told doctors on Monday to stop using Enteryx, a device used to treat acid-reflux disease that Boston Scientific Corp. (BSX.N: Quote, Profile, Research) recalled last month.
    The FDA said doctors should immediately stop injecting Enteryx, due to serious adverse effects, including death, occurring in patients treated with the liquid chemical polymer used for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Enteryx is intended to be injected into the lower esophageal sphincter where it polymerizes into a spongy material that cannot be removed, the FDA said in a notice on its Web site (www.fda.gov).

  • Reply to

    Another product failure

    by paratrooper101st2003 Jun 27, 2005 5:22 PM
    stinkystinky1 stinkystinky1 Dec 15, 2005 9:19 PM Flag

    Well this next few weeks should be quite nasty for old outdated BSX.
    LOST REVENUES

    If drug-coated stents -- now used in nearly 9 of 10 stent procedures in the U.S. -- are proven to be more dangerous than bare-metal ones, it could be a financial blow to both J&J and Boston Scientific. Boston garners 41% of its revenues from its Taxus stent. And even widely diversified J&J said its Cypher stent drove 25% of second-quarter sales growth. Those products helped propel both companies onto the BusinessWeek 50 list of top corporate performers.

    The stakes could very well go beyond lost revenues. Competitors such as Medtronic Inc. ( MDT ) and Abbott Laboratories ( ABT ) are developing their own stents featuring a coating made of a synthetic copy of the outside of a red blood cell that may reduce clotting risk. And, in a post-Vioxx world, companies that fail to address potential safety problems as quickly as possible face severe repercussions. In fact, plaintiffs' lawyers are already sniffing at this problem.

BSX
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