Tue, Jul 22, 2014, 4:56 AM EDT - U.S. Markets open in 4 hrs 34 mins

Recent

% | $
Click the to save as a favorite.

SIGA Technologies, Inc. Message Board

strawhatjoe 41 posts  |  Last Activity: Jul 19, 2014 2:36 PM Member since: Jun 8, 2009
SortNewest  |  Oldest  |  Highest Rated Expand all messages
  • strawhatjoe by strawhatjoe Jul 19, 2014 2:36 PM Flag

    Home
    Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes
    July 19, 2014



    Hepatitis C cured in co-infected HIV patients






    A multicenter team of researchers report that in a phase III clinical trial, a combination drug therapy cures chronic hepatitis C in the majority of patients co-infected with both HIV and hepatitis C.




    "In many settings, hepatitis C is now a leading cause of death among HIV co-infected patients," says Mark Sulkowski, M.D., medical director of the Johns Hopkins Infectious Disease Center for Viral Hepatitis and professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Approximately one-third of HIV patients in the United States have hepatitis C, with an estimated 7 million co-infected patients worldwide.

    Because of poor tolerability to the previous standard of treatments for hepatitis C, including injections of interferon-alpha and medications that can have interactions with anti-retroviral medications used to treat HIV, this population of co-infection patients has been considered difficult to treat. Data from this phase III clinical trial were incorporated into the FDA's approval of the new drug, sofosbuvir, last December, so treatment with this all-oral regimen—sofosbuvir and ribavirin—is considered on-label.

    The trial, paid for by the developers of sofosbuvir, Gilead Sciences, is published in the July 23 issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association.

    Researchers and doctors enrolled study participants from the United States and Puerto Rico through 34 academic, private practice and community health centers. In total, doctors administered sofosbuvir and ribavirin to a total of 223 HIV-1 patients chronically co-infected with hepatitis C (genotypes 1, 2 or 3) either for 12 weeks (for treatment-naive patients with genotype 2 or 3) or for 24 weeks (for treatment-naive patents with genotype 1 or treatment-experienced patents with genotype 2 or 3). Twelve weeks after treatment ended, researchers tested patients again for hepatitis C infection to determine if treatment was effective.

    For treatment-naive patients, 76 percent with genotype 1, 88 percent with genotype 2 and 67 percent with genotype 3 were cured. "We've always termed this to be 'sustained virologic response,'" says Sulkowski, "but we now know that means hepatitis C has been cured." Treatment-experienced patients had even better cure rates: 92 percent for patients with genotype 2 and 94 percent for patients with genotype 3. Seven patients discontinued treatment because of adverse events, but there were no observed adverse effects on HIV or its treatment.

    "The likelihood that a patient with chronic, long-standing hepatitis C infection would have spontaneous cure is near zero," says Sulkowski, "so if these patients had not been treated, none would have been cured." Because of this, typically the control group of patients in a clinical trial undergoes the standard-of-care treatment, which for hepatitis C is weekly Interferon injections and twice-daily ribavirin orally. However, neither the investigators nor the potential clinical trial participants were willing to accept a therapy that for HIV co-infected patients had both low efficacy and poor tolerability.

    In addition, says Sulkowski, "Doctors and patients alike recognize the idea that it would be difficult, if not impossible, to randomize clinical trial participants to an injectable treatment (interferon) that's linked to many side effects versus an oral treatment (sofosbuvir plus ribavirin)." For these reasons, the clinical trial, named PHOTON-1, was open-label, nonrandomized and uncontrolled. "The PHOTON-1 study represents the first clinical trial to demonstrate that we can cure hepatitis C in patients with HIV co-infection without the use of interferon," says Sulkowski. "As such, it represents a transformative step in our approach to this therapeutic area."

    Explore further: New drug combo cures toughest cases of hepatitis C, hints to future injection-free therapies

    More information: Paper: DOI: 10.1001/jama.2014.7734
    Editorial: DOI: 10.1001/jama.2014.7734



    Journal reference: Journal of the American Medical Association search and more info website

    Provided by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine search and more info website


    view popular
    5 /5 (2 votes)











    Share on Tumblr

    add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf






    Featured

    Popular

    Most shared




    Toxoplasma gondii can stop cancer in its tracks as a vaccine Jul 18, 2014 11

    One injection stops type 2 diabetes in its tracks in mice without side effects Jul 16, 2014 2

    To change attitudes, don't argue —— agree, extremely Jul 17, 2014 7

    Experimental 'pulse radiotherapy' kills cancer cells while sparing healthy tissue Jul 17, 2014 0

    How does the cerebellum work? Jul 17, 2014 12

    Medical Xpress on facebook






    Guide To Food Allergies

    LiveStrong

    The #1 WORST Carb Ever (NEVER Eat This)

    Fix Your Blood Sugar

    We Reveal The Top 2 Skin Tighteners In 2014

    Trending Lifestyles

    5 Exercises That Age You FASTER (Avoid #1 at All Costs)

    Old School New Body

    by Taboola

    Sponsored Content


    Top
    Send Feedback




    Related Stories

    New drug combo cures toughest cases of hepatitis C, hints to future injection-free therapies Jan 15, 2014

    Efforts to cure hepatitis C, the liver-damaging infectious disease that has for years killed more Americans than HIV/AIDS, are about to get simpler and more effective, according to new research at Johns Hopkins and elsewhere.

    New combination drug therapy proves very effective in Hepatitis C treatments Apr 12, 2014

    Treatment options for the 170 million people worldwide with chronic Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) are evolving rapidly, although the available regimens often come with significant side effects. Two multi-center clinical trials ...

    Impressive SVR12 data for once-daily combination to treat HCV genotype 1 patients Apr 12, 2014

    Results from three Phase III clinical trials (ION-1, ION-2 and ION-3) evaluating the investigational once-daily fixed-dose combination of the nucleotide analogue polymerase inhibitor sofosbuvir (SOF) 400mg and the NS5A inhibitor ...

    Breakthrough treatment for hepatitis C Apr 15, 2014

    (Medical Xpress)—A breakthrough treatment for hepatitis C that halves treatment time has been developed in an international clinical trial that included The University of Queensland.

    New data for HCV genotype 4 patients with simeprevir- and sofosbuvir-based regimens Apr 12, 2014

    Results from RESTORE , a phase III, multicentre, single-arm, open-label study presented today at the International Liver Congress 2014 showed that simeprevir 150 mg once-daily for 12 weeks in combination with peginterferon ...



    Recommended for you

    Researchers characterize neurologic response associated with placebo effect 12 hours ago

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurological disorder, affecting almost 10 million people worldwide. While there is no cure for this disease, many patients are able to successfully manage their symptoms. Surgical ...

    High-dose fluticasone effective against eosinophilic esophagitis 22 hours ago

    Results from a clinical trial show that high doses of the corticosteroid fluticasone propionate safely and effectively induce remission in many people with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), a chronic inflammatory disease of ...

    Chikungunya cases hit nearly 200 in Puerto Rico, 2 in Florida 22 hours ago

    Health authorities Friday reported nearly 200 confirmed cases of the chikungunya virus in Puerto Rico and the first two cases of the mosquito-borne disease in Florida.

    Adults with eosinophilic esophagitis should consider a diet change Jul 18, 2014

    Dietary elimination is a successful method of treatment for adults with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), according to a new study1 in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official clinical practice journal of the ...

    Lab safety needs to be more open in the face of risky pandemic flu research Jul 18, 2014

    The danger of reporting findings before peer review is that scientists often can't talk about the details of their research, which can lead to hype or fear in the media.

    Consuming probiotics for a month helps diminish fat accumulation in the liver, according to a new study Jul 18, 2014

    Spanish scientists have demonstrated through an experiment on obese rats that the consumption of probiotics during thirty days helps diminish the accumulation of fat in the liver. This new finding, published today by the ...





    User comments




    Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more


    Sign In
    Click here to reset your password.
    Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.









    Sign In

    Register





    Topics

    Conditions


    Latest news


    Week's top


    Other news


    Spotlight news


    News w/ video




    •top
    •Home
    •Search

    •Help
    •About us
    •FAQ
    •Сontact

    •Science X Account
    •Sponsored Account
    •Newsletter
    •RSS feeds

    •Cancer / Oncology
    •HIV & AIDS news
    •Immunology news
    •Genetics news



    Privacy Policy
    Terms of use
    Disclaimer


    © Medical Xpress 2011-2014, Science X network





    Home
    Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes
    July 19, 2014



    Hepatitis C cured in co-infected HIV patients






    A multicenter team of researchers report that in a phase III clinical trial, a combination drug therapy cures chronic hepatitis C in the majority of patients co-infected with both HIV and hepatitis C.




    "In many settings, hepatitis C is now a leading cause of death among HIV co-infected patients," says Mark Sulkowski, M.D., medical director of the Johns Hopkins Infectious Disease Center for Viral Hepatitis and professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Approximately one-third of HIV patients in the United States have hepatitis C, with an estimated 7 million co-infected patients worldwide.

    Because of poor tolerability to the previous standard of treatments for hepatitis C, including injections of interferon-alpha and medications that can have interactions with anti-retroviral medications used to treat HIV, this population of co-infection patients has been considered difficult to treat. Data from this phase III clinical trial were incorporated into the FDA's approval of the new drug, sofosbuvir, last December, so treatment with this all-oral regimen—sofosbuvir and ribavirin—is considered on-label.

    The trial, paid for by the developers of sofosbuvir, Gilead Sciences, is published in the July 23 issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association.

    Researchers and doctors enrolled study participants from the United States and Puerto Rico through 34 academic, private practice and community health centers. In total, doctors administered sofosbuvir and ribavirin to a total of 223 HIV-1 patients chronically co-infected with hepatitis C (genotypes 1, 2 or 3) either for 12 weeks (for treatment-naive patients with genotype 2 or 3) or for 24 weeks (for treatment-naive patents with genotype 1 or treatment-experienced patents with genotype 2 or 3). Twelve weeks after treatment ended, researchers tested patients again for hepatitis C infection to determine if treatment was effective.

    For treatment-naive patients, 76 percent with genotype 1, 88 percent with genotype 2 and 67 percent with genotype 3 were cured. "We've always termed this to be 'sustained virologic response,'" says Sulkowski, "but we now know that means hepatitis C has been cured." Treatment-experienced patients had even better cure rates: 92 percent for patients with genotype 2 and 94 percent for patients with genotype 3. Seven patients discontinued treatment because of adverse events, but there were no observed adverse effects on HIV or its treatment.

    "The likelihood that a patient with chronic, long-standing hepatitis C infection would have spontaneous cure is near zero," says Sulkowski, "so if these patients had not been treated, none would have been cured." Because of this, typically the control group of patients in a clinical trial undergoes the standard-of-care treatment, which for hepatitis C is weekly Interferon injections and twice-daily ribavirin orally. However, neither the investigators nor the potential clinical trial participants were willing to accept a therapy that for HIV co-infected patients had both low efficacy and poor tolerability.

    In addition, says Sulkowski, "Doctors and patients alike recognize the idea that it would be difficult, if not impossible, to randomize clinical trial participants to an injectable treatment (interferon) that's linked to many side effects versus an oral treatment (sofosbuvir plus ribavirin)." For these reasons, the clinical trial, named PHOTON-1, was open-label, nonrandomized and uncontrolled. "The PHOTON-1 study represents the first clinical trial to demonstrate that we can cure hepatitis C in patients with HIV co-infection without the use of interferon," says Sulkowski. "As such, it represents a transformative step in our approach to this therapeutic area."

    Explore further: New drug combo cures toughest cases of hepatitis C, hints to future injection-free therapies

    More information: Paper: DOI: 10.1001/jama.2014.7734
    Editorial: DOI: 10.1001/jama.2014.7734



    Journal reference: Journal of the American Medical Association search and more info website

    Provided by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine search and more info website


    view popular
    5 /5 (2 votes)











    Share on Tumblr

    add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf






    Featured

    Popular

    Most shared




    Toxoplasma gondii can stop cancer in its tracks as a vaccine Jul 18, 2014 11

    One injection stops type 2 diabetes in its tracks in mice without side effects Jul 16, 2014 2

    To change attitudes, don't argue —— agree, extremely Jul 17, 2014 7

    Experimental 'pulse radiotherapy' kills cancer cells while sparing healthy tissue Jul 17, 2014 0

    How does the cerebellum work? Jul 17, 2014 12

    Medical Xpress on facebook






    Guide To Food Allergies

    LiveStrong

    The #1 WORST Carb Ever (NEVER Eat This)

    Fix Your Blood Sugar

    We Reveal The Top 2 Skin Tighteners In 2014

    Trending Lifestyles

    5 Exercises That Age You FASTER (Avoid #1 at All Costs)

    Old School New Body

    by Taboola

    Sponsored Content


    Top
    Send Feedback




    Related Stories

    New drug combo cures toughest cases of hepatitis C, hints to future injection-free therapies Jan 15, 2014

    Efforts to cure hepatitis C, the liver-damaging infectious disease that has for years killed more Americans than HIV/AIDS, are about to get simpler and more effective, according to new research at Johns Hopkins and elsewhere.

    New combination drug therapy proves very effective in Hepatitis C treatments Apr 12, 2014

    Treatment options for the 170 million people worldwide with chronic Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) are evolving rapidly, although the available regimens often come with significant side effects. Two multi-center clinical trials ...

    Impressive SVR12 data for once-daily combination to treat HCV genotype 1 patients Apr 12, 2014

    Results from three Phase III clinical trials (ION-1, ION-2 and ION-3) evaluating the investigational once-daily fixed-dose combination of the nucleotide analogue polymerase inhibitor sofosbuvir (SOF) 400mg and the NS5A inhibitor ...

    Breakthrough treatment for hepatitis C Apr 15, 2014

    (Medical Xpress)—A breakthrough treatment for hepatitis C that halves treatment time has been developed in an international clinical trial that included The University of Queensland.

    New data for HCV genotype 4 patients with simeprevir- and sofosbuvir-based regimens Apr 12, 2014

    Results from RESTORE , a phase III, multicentre, single-arm, open-label study presented today at the International Liver Congress 2014 showed that simeprevir 150 mg once-daily for 12 weeks in combination with peginterferon ...



    Recommended for you

    Researchers characterize neurologic response associated with placebo effect 12 hours ago

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurological disorder, affecting almost 10 million people worldwide. While there is no cure for this disease, many patients are able to successfully manage their symptoms. Surgical ...

    High-dose fluticasone effective against eosinophilic esophagitis 22 hours ago

    Results from a clinical trial show that high doses of the corticosteroid fluticasone propionate safely and effectively induce remission in many people with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), a chronic inflammatory disease of ...

    Chikungunya cases hit nearly 200 in Puerto Rico, 2 in Florida 22 hours ago

    Health authorities Friday reported nearly 200 confirmed cases of the chikungunya virus in Puerto Rico and the first two cases of the mosquito-borne disease in Florida.

    Adults with eosinophilic esophagitis should consider a diet change Jul 18, 2014

    Dietary elimination is a successful method of treatment for adults with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), according to a new study1 in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official clinical practice journal of the ...

    Lab safety needs to be more open in the face of risky pandemic flu research Jul 18, 2014

    The danger of reporting findings before peer review is that scientists often can't talk about the details of their research, which can lead to hype or fear in the media.

    Consuming probiotics for a month helps diminish fat accumulation in the liver, according to a new study Jul 18, 2014

    Spanish scientists have demonstrated through an experiment on obese rats that the consumption of probiotics during thirty days helps diminish the accumulation of fat in the liver. This new finding, published today by the ...





    User comments




    Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more


    Sign In
    Click here to reset your password.
    Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.









    Sign In

    Register





    Topics

    Conditions


    Latest news


    Week's top


    Other news


    Spotlight news


    News w/ video




    •top
    •Home
    •Search

    •Help
    •About us
    •FAQ
    •Сontact

    •Science X Account
    •Sponsored Account
    •Newsletter
    •RSS feeds

    •Cancer / Oncology
    •HIV & AIDS news
    •Immunology news
    •Genetics news



    Privacy Policy
    Terms of use
    Disclaimer


    © Medical Xpress 2011-2014, Science X network


    Mark Sulkowski, M.D., medical director of the Johns Hopkins Infectious Disease Center for Viral Hepatitis and professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Approximately one-third of HIV patients in the United States have hepatitis C, with an estimated 7 million co-infected patients worldwide.

    Because of poor tolerability to the previous standard of treatments for hepatitis C, including injections of interferon-alpha and medications that can have interactions with anti-retroviral medications used to treat HIV, this population of co-infection patients has been considered difficult to treat. Data from this phase III clinical trial were incorporated into the FDA's approval of the new drug, sofosbuvir, last December, so treatment with this all-oral regimen—sofosbuvir and ribavirin—is considered on-label.

    The trial, paid for by the developers of sofosbuvir, Gilead Sciences, is published in the July 23 issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association.

    Researchers and doctors enrolled study participants from the United States and Puerto Rico through 34 academic, private practice and community health centers. In total, doctors administered sofosbuvir and ribavirin to a total of 223 HIV-1 patients chronically co-infected with hepatitis C (genotypes 1, 2 or 3) either for 12 weeks (for treatment-naive patients with genotype 2 or 3) or for 24 weeks (for treatment-naive patents with genotype 1 or treatment-experienced patents with genotype 2 or 3). Twelve weeks after treatment ended, researchers tested patients again for hepatitis C infection to determine if treatment was effective.

    For treatment-naive patie

  • strawhatjoe by strawhatjoe Jul 19, 2014 2:26 PM Flag

    Hepatitis is becoming more common disease because of the way it's transmitted. People are having sex now more freely because of societal changes and infidelity among married couples which are spreading rapidly all over the world, mainly because of poverty and the failing institution of marriage. As the population balloons all over the world, poverty will become more prevalent, thus infidelity will only increase . Hence, diseases like hepatitis will spread in epidemic proportions. This will only get worse. We are already running out of medicines to treat diseases. It will not be long before a BIG PHARMA SEE THE POTENTIAL HERE!!!!!!!!

  • Someone bought way ahead of the news to come to avoid detection, but something "BIG" is brewing.

  • Phase 111 update due soon. "INO" no gooooood, as the Chinese would say.

  • PHASE 111 UPDATES DUE SOON!!!!!!!!!

  • There is only one star on the block--"DVAX."

  • I can't wait. We should see some positive moves next week.

  • Dvax is in line February, 2015.

  • Why is it that it's not tanking to zero as some of you may think is what should happen with the pending reverse split. Obviously, investors see it as a good thing, even with minimal institutional ownership interest in the stock.

  • Reply to

    Shorts, cover now or perish tomorrow!!!!!!!!!

    by strawhatjoe May 29, 2014 7:11 PM
    strawhatjoe strawhatjoe May 30, 2014 10:07 AM Flag

    My two cents advice to all of you who have not covered yet: Please, please, please cover while there are shares still available cheaply, otherwise perish at your own stupidity and stubbornness.

  • strawhatjoe by strawhatjoe May 29, 2014 10:45 PM Flag

    That should tell the shorts what kind fury the coming storm for shares will bring!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Now is the time to cover. Shares will get really, really scarce soon.

  • strawhatjoe by strawhatjoe May 29, 2014 10:00 AM Flag

    Some good news now will propel us to $2.00 by EOM

  • strawhatjoe strawhatjoe May 28, 2014 3:15 PM Flag

    Great! Let's squeeze the shorts out of here.

  • strawhatjoe strawhatjoe May 28, 2014 2:36 PM Flag

    Any idea when the reverse will happen.

  • strawhatjoe by strawhatjoe May 28, 2014 9:37 AM Flag

    Shorts, time to cover with reverse split vote soon to be out today.

  • Just a few more days and you all will see how a reverse split can cripple the shorts.

  • 1 FOR 50 REVERSE SPLIT AND THE STOCK RAN FROM $1.62 (REVERSE PRICE) TO $4.89. Today investors are taking some profits. We can see the same magic with DAVX.

  • strawhatjoe by strawhatjoe May 21, 2014 12:15 PM Flag

    Attracting interest again, somewhat!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Investors are smelling the roses and feeling more optimistic.

SIGA
2.59-0.08(-3.00%)Jul 21 4:00 PMEDT

Trending Tickers

i
Trending Tickers features significant U.S. stocks showing the most dramatic increase in user interest in Yahoo Finance in the previous hour over historic norms. The list is limited to those equities which trade at least 100,000 shares on an average day and have a market cap of more than $300 million.