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Radware Ltd. (RDWR) Message Board

tbpatter 31 posts  |  Last Activity: Nov 2, 2000 3:35 PM Member since: Jun 9, 1999
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  • Reply to

    indirect channels are gaining traction

    by tjmcnally Nov 2, 2000 2:28 PM
    tbpatter tbpatter Nov 2, 2000 3:35 PM Flag

    Yup. It is a great strategy. One that has paid
    off big for a lot of companies. One that comes to
    mind is Juniper Networks. Selling through indirect
    channels allows a company to focus like a lazer on
    technology as opposed to marketing. It should pay off big
    for Radware in the coming quarters too, I would
    expect.

  • tbpatter by tbpatter Jan 7, 2000 11:12 AM Flag

    Publicity would no doubt help. But in order get
    added attention from analysts, APWR will need to do
    more investment banking business.

    Analysts are
    rapidly becoming nothing but lackies for the investment
    banking arm of their firms. They will tout almost any
    company - good or bad - as long as it has the potential
    to give them business.

    Unfortunately for
    investors in AstroPower, well-run companies usually don't
    need to do alot of investment banking, such as
    follow-ons and secondaries.

  • Talking with someone who has played the MM game.
    When we traded with low volume for most of early
    afternoon above 45's and then took the quick plunge into
    43's he said it looked like an MM move to clean out
    stops.

    In other words MM sees bunch a stops below trading
    range and when volume gets REAL low they stop buying.
    This causes price to fall some, hits some stops and
    BANG. Get a domino effect knocking out more stops.


    Why? The MM then goes in and buys cheap shares before
    price recovers.

    Shushkidude if you can't accept
    that MM's manipulate stock prices, then perhaps *you*
    need a bit of growing up to do.

  • Talking with someone who has played the MM game.
    When we traded with low volume for most of early
    afternoon above 45's and then took the quick plunge into
    43's he said it looked like an MM move to clean out
    stops.

    In other words MM sees bunch a stops below trading
    range and when volume gets REAL low they stop buying.
    This causes price to fall some, hits some stops and
    BANG. Get a domino effect knocking out more stops.


    Why? The MM then goes in and buys cheap shares before
    price recovers.

    If you can't accept that MM's
    manipulate stock prices, then perhaps *you* need a bit of
    growing up to do. RDWR appears to be one of the most
    manipulated stocks I've seen lately.

  • Reply to

    why shorts back suddenly

    by tbpatter Dec 1, 1999 10:29 AM
    tbpatter tbpatter Dec 1, 1999 10:56 AM Flag

    There are numerous ways they can manipulate the
    stock price of companies with small floats, and it can
    be very dramatic on low volume days. They can sell
    short, sell their long positions, as you stated (the
    theory is once they get the downward momentum going,
    others [generally small "weak handed" investors] will
    sell, and the process snowballs). Also, they can put
    out a very large order at a significantly lower price
    than offering which causes downward movement. They can
    then cancel order before it is filled, or when it is
    only partially filled. There are probably several
    other ways as well.

  • Isn't it interesting that tons of shorts are
    suddenly back. Think about it, there is no change in the
    company, its competitive position, or new news of any
    sort. Yet suddenly all these shorts appear apparently
    out of nowhere.

    I agree with JDHowerd2...it
    does look like somebody wants to drive the price down
    in order to get in at a lower price. Probably the
    MMs trying to exploit the little guys again.

  • Reply to

    reasons to buy RDWR:

    by jdhowered2 Nov 22, 1999 9:15 AM
    tbpatter tbpatter Nov 22, 1999 10:34 AM Flag

    Thanks for the excellent points! Finally there is
    somebody looking at the fundamentals of the company.
    Smart, long-term investors will be very interested in
    your points.

    Let's hope that the volitility
    calms down a bit and the day-traders lose interest.
    Then we can see real appreciation of the stock as
    smart money begins to flow in.

    Good luck to all!

  • Reply to

    compaq+proxim=

    by tbpatter Nov 15, 1999 9:54 AM
    tbpatter tbpatter Nov 16, 1999 10:14 AM Flag

    Did you read the press-release and other
    write-ups? This is huge for Proxim. It confirms their
    technology, it generates name recognition, and it will create
    potentially very large rev. streams.

    As far as
    takeovers that is anybody's guess. Remember, though, that
    PROX is a player in both W-Lan and W-HomeNetworking.
    They are the world leader in both, and the Compaq news
    further attests that fact.

  • Reply to

    compaq+proxim=

    by tbpatter Nov 15, 1999 9:54 AM
    tbpatter tbpatter Nov 15, 1999 4:21 PM Flag

    Licensing would be a very good strategy. It helps
    propigate the technology and, as you mentioned, has huge
    margins.

    Overall it looks like PROX is
    experiencing some resistance at the 65 level. I think that if
    it breaks through we'll be on our way to dot-com
    heights.

  • tbpatter by tbpatter Nov 15, 1999 9:54 AM Flag

    the news (see press-release) that is going to cause PROX to break-out.

    This deal is quite possibly the most significant event for Proxim this year, if not historically.

  • tbpatter by tbpatter Nov 12, 1999 9:59 AM Flag

    If this puppy climbs above 65 they'll be no stopping it. Its all about momentum now!

  • tbpatter by tbpatter Nov 11, 1999 10:40 AM Flag

    Hambrecht &Quist Communications Research
    Note

    Proxim (PROX)
    Rating: BUY-FOCUS LIST
    November 9,
    1999

    American Electronics Association (AEA) Conference
    Update

    - Home networking and vertical market trends remain
    strong.

    - The Company�s technology path is well defined.
    Approval of the FCC�s wideband hopping proposal and
    development of its HIPERLAN products are on track.

    -
    PROX has successfully created a consumer friendly
    product. The Company continues to win numerous industry
    awards, and sign significant distributors for its
    Symphony products, such as OfficeMax, Staples, and Best
    Buy.

    - PROX�s competitor Aironet was acquired by Cisco
    for $800M in Cisco shares. This benchmark suggests
    PROX shares are significantly undervalued considering
    the Company�s larger revenue base, established
    profitability, as well as its leadership in building products,
    alliances and distribution in the home networking market.

  • Reply to

    by owning csco

    by marvelousmarvinthroneberry Nov 9, 1999 11:18 AM
    tbpatter tbpatter Nov 9, 1999 5:22 PM Flag

    I'm long PROX, but I really doubt LU would be
    interested in making a buyout bid. Proxim and LU have been
    in standards war for the last couple of years. Would
    they bag the whole thing just one up Cisco?

    On
    the other hand, I think Motorola or Intel are very
    likely candidates to buy Proxim. And I do agree that
    Cisco's announcement validates, strongly, the W-LAN
    marketplace.

  • Reply to

    BEAR ALERT !!

    by theradwarebear Nov 5, 1999 11:57 AM
    tbpatter tbpatter Nov 5, 1999 12:05 PM Flag

    where will this puppy stop? is there any reason for the collapse halt at any particular value?

  • tbpatter by tbpatter Nov 1, 1999 9:39 AM Flag

    Business Week (11/8/99; p. 108) says that Corixa Corp. developed a new, potent psoriasis drug. Will this be a neg. for ABGX since one of the drugs in its pipeline is for this disease?

  • Reply to

    Per MSN Earnings 10/14/99

    by baltybum Oct 7, 1999 2:52 PM
    tbpatter tbpatter Oct 7, 1999 3:45 PM Flag

    I was just at the 3Com website. They have two
    ADSL modems listed under the "HomeConnect" brand name:
    one with Alcatel chipset (internal modem) and one
    with ADI chipset (external). The internal does not
    comply with many of the standards, including G.Lite, but
    the external one does.

    Also, their one router
    listed contains an ADI chipset. But I doubt if Bell
    Atlantic is using it.

    Regarding 3Com paying
    royalties: if they are shipping ADI chipsets then they *buy*
    them from ADI. ADI in turn pays a royalty to
    Aware.

    Hope this helps!

  • Bank Boston Robertson Stevens analyst Paul Johnson reiterated his buy rating on Aware, stating that the stock price could see 50% to 100% appreciation in 6 months.

  • Reply to

    insider selling

    by smallinvstor Sep 9, 1999 6:10 PM
    tbpatter tbpatter Sep 20, 1999 10:14 AM Flag

    Proxim is mentioned in the special wireless section of today's Wall St. Journal, page R10.

  • Reply to

    This is strange

    by bexmonstur Aug 18, 1999 11:18 AM
    tbpatter tbpatter Sep 3, 1999 4:25 PM Flag

    Why? Here is a hit: before you invest in gspn you'd better be sure you understand the difference between CAP ADSL and DMT ADSL.

  • Here is an interesting article from dslprime.com
    about Full-Rate/G.Lite chipsets (dual mode) vs.
    straight G.Lite chipsets (the cool thing is that Aware has
    both avenues covered!!), enjoy:

    Chip Dance
    G.Lite alone or Multimode (G.Lite + Full-rate) G.Lite's
    on the way, but whose chips will serve it?


    Many major companies (including Alcatel, Globespan,
    Orckit, Conexant, ADI and TI) now offer multimode
    chipsets (both G.Lite and full-rate), while others
    (Lucent, Centillium, Siemens, Itex) emphasize their
    chipsets designed to do G.Lite alone. The opinions on both
    sides are strong.

    Doing G.Lite alone results
    in a smaller, simpler chipset, which has advantages
    in power, port density, and� cost. Most multimode
    chips draw 1-3 watts more power (including line
    driver), require more board space, and cost at least
    $2/port more. But G.Lite can't go faster than 1.5 meg,
    while full-rate can go as high as 7 or 8 meg. (The
    customer must be close to the CO and willing to pay the
    added price.)

    Equipment manufacturers have
    made different decisions. Compaq and Dell have bought
    many of the quarter-million G.Lite chips shipped from
    Lucent, while IBM went with TI's multimode chips. The
    question the market will determine is how much the user
    will value the potential to go faster. Fewer than 10%
    of residential users today are willing to pay the
    premium for speeds greater than 1.5 meg, and those more
    than a mile from the CO won't be able to reach maximum
    speeds anyway. But often consumers want to keep their
    future options open, and hope one day to be able to
    upgrade. No one wants to buy a modem thinking they may
    have to throw it out if they go for a faster speed.


    Each approach has strong partisans. Aidan
    O'Rourke of Broadcom supported full-rate, stating that "no
    provider will want to deploy technology, either at the CO
    or the customer premises, that will restrict the
    data-rates to below 1.5 Mbits/sec."�

    Vic Jayasimha
    of ADI agreed, "It is difficult to imagine why COs
    would provision G.Lite when for a small premium in
    power and price, they could provision a
    full-rate/G.Lite combination."

    Tom Brookes of Alcatel
    Microelectronics added "Telcos can protect their investment with
    full-rate." But Faraj Aalaei of Centillium counters "There
    are a number of problems with this pie-in-the-sky
    proposition. In exchange for the presumed future-proofing of
    the network, the network operator gets to buy more
    expensive equipment, which consumes 2 to 3 times more
    power, and takes a lot more room in the CO, cabinets and
    huts."

    Craig Garen of Lucent added that "G.Lite
    is an inherently lower cost solution, notably less
    complex, so that price differences will open up over time,
    whatever the short-term pricing policies. Customers should
    be only sold what they need, rather than what's
    convenient for companies that want to leverage their
    full-rate products."

    DSL Prime's phone lines and
    email have been burning since we started asking about
    this topic. Uwe Hering of Infineon/Siemens pointed out
    the simplicity and size of a G.Lite design allowed
    them to add features, such as voice on the same card.
    Lucent has announced a similar DSL + voice card. The
    smaller G.Lite footprint makes it easier do design a
    combination card, incorporating a home networking or ethernet
    interface.

    Some applications, such as PC Card modems
    for portable computer, virtually require G.Lite. But
    Dan Arazi of Orckit "strongly believes that the
    market will demand upgrade to
    full-rate splitterless
    ADSL sooner than anticipated." Todd Andreini of TI
    "absolutely believes the market will require full-rate or an
    upgrade path." We have much more, including commentary
    from most companies above, here, and will have a full
    article for our print edition at the end of September.
    Because BA, BS, US West, MCI, Northpoint, Rhythms, and
    Covad have all told DSL Prime they will support G.Lite,
    we expect much more on this story.

RDWR
16.83+0.19(+1.14%)Apr 16 4:00 PMEDT

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