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Intel Corporation Message Board

theblueredmonk 212 posts  |  Last Activity: 13 hours ago Member since: Aug 14, 2004
  • Reply to

    Twink/Nenni the Pinheaded Internet Stalker

    by wallisweaver Jan 25, 2015 9:31 PM
    theblueredmonk theblueredmonk Jan 26, 2015 11:39 AM Flag

    [No, a sick man is a man who has a fixation on another man on the internet and follows him everywhere and spends all day long trying to glean every bit of information he can about him. That's pathological. Get some mental health care. Your fixation on me is truly creepy. Stop using this message board as therapy and get some professional help.]

    Perhaps, it's more simple than that? Perhaps he wants a date?

  • theblueredmonk theblueredmonk Jan 25, 2015 3:30 PM Flag

    More a lack of financial commitment by anyone in the WinRT ecosystem to spend the money to make legacy Windows software run on ARM chips even by emulation the way Intel has with Android on x86.
    ----

    Tut tut Marsavian, stepping into the Weaver land with that one.

    WinRT was an attempt by MS to create a walled garden, an Applesk control that could drive profits via the store. The only way to run 'real' Windows applications in RT (other than MS office) was to jail break the device - which would break the warranty...MS, never supported 'legacy' applications, other than it's own, with RT. You should know that both OEM's and software firms don't go against MS directives (which is why you find very few dual boot (Andriod, Windows) devices supported out of the box).

    Do not take this as a defence of RT. It was ill conceived, and should die ASAP.

  • Reply to

    OT: The End of the ARM Era: Amazon say's no

    by theblueredmonk Jan 23, 2015 10:38 AM
    theblueredmonk theblueredmonk Jan 23, 2015 11:10 AM Flag

    [It doesn't change the "it's meaningless" conclusion. ]

    You must be right. I was thinking that Amazon wouldn't drop 300 million on a start up, spend at least the same amount again on new designs, just to say "oops", how are we going to manufacture them? Especially, as they couldn't have just gone to Intel in the first place right?

  • Reply to

    The End of the ARM Era

    by wallisweaver Jan 21, 2015 10:37 PM
    theblueredmonk theblueredmonk Jan 23, 2015 11:03 AM Flag

    [Yet more churlishness and meaningless generalizations from MonkBoy meaning nothing. More and more you are like the little dog that runs out from underneath the porch and tries to bite people on the ankles. Your posts are all form over substance these days. Little one liner gotcha stings that apparently bring you comfort as ARM struggles with its technology, manufacturing, fabrication and capacity.

    Where's the meat, MonkBoy?]

    I am not sure how you want me to reply? I attempted to answer the posters question (Apples move to 64bit), it's a simple as that. If you think my answer is wrong, just say so.

  • Reply to

    OT: The End of the ARM Era: Amazon say's no

    by theblueredmonk Jan 23, 2015 10:38 AM
    theblueredmonk theblueredmonk Jan 23, 2015 11:00 AM Flag

    [Amazon has been previously tied into ARM designs with its tablet line. A continuation is no big surprise. And like you say it's fabless so that can change in the future. And you really want me to get excited about a mere 300 million investment? No way. Now if it were a $12 billion investment like a fab then that would bring me pause.

    No, MonkBoy, this is relatively meaningless. In the meantime the ARM fabrication crisis continues unabated.]

    Dear, Britney "oops i did it again" Weaver, this isn't phone, or tablet, it's for AWS (their cloud environment).

  • Wallis, you need to get on the phone to Amazon AWS HQ, as they are just about to drop 300 million on an fabless startup that uses ARM CPU's in it's designs. They clearly don't know about all these fab problems...

  • Reply to

    The End of the ARM Era

    by wallisweaver Jan 21, 2015 10:37 PM
    theblueredmonk theblueredmonk Jan 23, 2015 10:29 AM Flag

    The best design doesn't always win. They don't.
    ----

    So why will Intel gain share then?

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    "if the CPU benchmark scores are legitimate," If you're suspect of the results why should I trust them?
    ----

    You can't trust the scores from any SoC/CPU that isn't in shipping devices, I would give the same proviso for ARM based SoC's.

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    Is this a business plan or simply a talking point for ARM? To me it sounds like a talking point. Here's what a business plan sounds like.
    ----

    I pointed this out to show how 'quick' the market responded to Apple moving to V8. Do what you will with that information, it's nothing more than that:)

    ----
    Will Qualcom, Nvidia, Microtek or any other supplier be so bold? No, they are in bed with A&B tier handset suppliers. Will they help pay for ads?
    ----

    You've been talking about this for years, but it just hasn't worked...yet. Do you know that the reason why Xiaomi (big in China) can produce new designs so quickly? It just takes the reference designs from it's suppliers...

  • Reply to

    The End of the ARM Era

    by wallisweaver Jan 21, 2015 10:37 PM
    theblueredmonk theblueredmonk Jan 23, 2015 8:00 AM Flag

    I thought about your question and here's the best way to answer it. Where ARM blew it happened over a year ago. The iPhone had current technology, but not always the latest technology. That changed in the 5s when it went to 28nm 64 bit... Intel 14nm will land against Apple's A8. For argument sake we'll say it's behind, but not far behind in benchmarks.
    ----

    The quick move to V8 of the ISA by Apple certainly did throw roadmaps to the wall (esp QCOM), but 50% of phones this year will be able to run that ISA.

    Lets make it clear cut, lets say Intel's 14nm chips are better performing than the A8. Intel will still struggle to get tier 1 design wins. Why? Intel's potential parters have no faith in the roadmap, it's going to take time to win that trust back (this point can't be emphasized enough). It's also worth remembering, Intel isn't competing with AMD like companies...

    ----
    This is the C-tier handset manufactures eating the market share away from ARM by offering premium cell phone technology at the $200 price point. The fight will be with ARM at 20nm. How will ARM 28nm do against 14nm from Intel? Demand for 28nm and older nodes will die off as orders fall off. This concept is called 'Inferior technology." Intel did it with servers and will do it with phones. It's not top down, it's bottom up market penetration.
    ----

    ARM is talking about $75 phones with LTE this year...

    As for ARM 28nm against Intel 14nm, well, if the CPU benchmark scores are legitimate, then Cherrytrail (for tablets) is going to struggle to find clear water against these 'Inferior technology' 28nm parts. It clearly struggles against existing 20nm parts in the market today, let alone the parts coming later this year.

  • Reply to

    The End of the ARM Era

    by wallisweaver Jan 21, 2015 10:37 PM
    theblueredmonk theblueredmonk Jan 22, 2015 4:49 PM Flag

    ARM isn't dead at 20nm. But they will start to face real competition from Intel starting now going into full pain mode within a year.
    ----
    Why?
    ----
    The fabs that can afford to push 20nm aren't the ones to worry, for now. The backlog will occur at 28nm and older.
    ----
    ?

  • Reply to

    The End of the ARM Era

    by wallisweaver Jan 21, 2015 10:37 PM
    theblueredmonk theblueredmonk Jan 22, 2015 10:50 AM Flag

    [An Intel fan? Ha, then you must internally hemorrhage as you post your numerous bashes. I have been largely accurate with my predictions on ARM's fabrication. Please feel free to offer an in-depth analysis where you believe that I have been wrong instead of support-free rubbish comments. ]

    When I have bashed Intel? I have not.

    You have been an absolute *failure* in predicting ARM's fabrication failure from since the 40/45nm node. If you can't see that, you are truly blind. It was only a few months ago that you predicted that we wouldn't see 20nm and here were are *hundreds of millions* of 20nm SoC's later (from 2 foundries)...

    [As I commented recently it's the end of the ARM dominance era, which is absolutely true. If you believe that ARM still has dominance in performance, energy efficiency, price and capacity please offer some type of support because there is a huge body of evidence that this is not the truth.]

    Look, let me make this crystal clear. The ARM foundaries have *never* have the performance, power, price over Intel that you describe above. What the foundaries and the broader ecosystem have (over Intel) is the ability to bring new designs to the market quickly whilst continuing to improve the process and design for that node.

    Intel has the best transistors. Intel has the best fabrication technology. I doubt anyone would argue this when speaking so broadly. However, this means little when you don't have the the right products in the market at the right time. Surely, even you can see that? Is that bashing?

    Or are you confusing the design of SoC's V fabrication technology?

  • Reply to

    The End of the ARM Era

    by wallisweaver Jan 21, 2015 10:37 PM
    theblueredmonk theblueredmonk Jan 22, 2015 7:58 AM Flag

    We can't even ask Nenni for his take because he went back to school to get a degree. And AE has fled all public forums. The ARM fanbois are down to the following three stooges: getanid61, MonkBoy and Twink.
    ----

    I think you'll find that I am a bit of an Intel fan as well. I will continue to challenge the rubbish that you produce. So if that makes be a stooge in your eyes, then so be it:)

    I must admit, I do smile when you type these "The End of the ARM Era" posts. You've been at this since the the 40/45 node. Begrudgingly, I can't help admire your ability to stick to something that has been proved to be wrong for so long.

    Always the optimist eh?:)

  • theblueredmonk theblueredmonk Jan 22, 2015 7:56 AM Flag

    who else is using (successfully) big.LITTLE
    i am sure the bluered monk will come up with a long list
    ----

    Actually, I only know of 1 other A57/A53 20nm design on 20nm and that's the Exynos 5433 in the Note 4. Sweepr over on the Anantech forms has done quite a bit of testing with the device. For what it's worth, it doesn't have the issues that are rumoured for the 810.

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