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Imperial Holdings, Inc. Message Board

trgsam 15 posts  |  Last Activity: 3 minutes 22 seconds ago Member since: Oct 24, 2008
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  • Reply to

    Coventry

    by uaddan65 Sep 2, 2015 12:07 AM
    trgsam trgsam 3 minutes 22 seconds ago Flag

    Just for #$%$ and giggle", to show how much money was made in fees in this industry, mainly using others people's money, here are the 3 tail numbers for the coventry's principals private airline. This is all totally public information and available on both the DE dept of state web site and on flight aware: Daddy Buerger:n426cf
    Son Buerger: 226cf for his challenger and 926cf for the Sikorsky he shares with mommy and daddy.
    Again while this has absolutely nothing to do with this particular site, and I apologize for getting off topic, I saw someone raised the issue and wanted to chime in. There are many differences between LPHI and Coventry, the main was how they were funded, but there seems to be a very common issue. While LPHI raised their money now deemed to be illegal, Coventry borrowed it from AIG. AIG gave them over or close to 20 billion to purchase policies and from what is being disclosed, CF nearly 10%, 2 billion in fees. That makes sense given their fleet of cars, planes and homes, totaling well over 150 million based on public information. Now while Pardo stole, all edgedlly, from individual investors, so did Coventry but one step removed. They allegedly used AIG monies, all from investors, to fund their own operation. While AIG is a knowledge firm, they are public, and raise money from investors from every level of society. They also were bailed out from the U.S. government to the tune of billions of dollars, again from US taxpayers. One might make the conclusion that we, all US taxpayers, paid for their planes, homes, limos, gambling(I'm told Reid is a very, very big player in Vegas, to many other things) when AIG was bailed out.
    Again I cannot emphasize enough all of my information comes from public sources, or in the case of my gambling statement, from prior Coventry employees.
    I don't begrudge anyone for being successful, whether it's Pardo or Buerger. I do however when the gains might be "I'll gotten".
    Im no attorney. Just my personal opinions

  • Reply to

    Coventry

    by uaddan65 Sep 2, 2015 12:07 AM

    It gets better. Reid, the son, has his own Sikorsky 76 helicopter to take him the 40 miles from his house in PA to his NJ shore house. He also has a 15 mil challenger 604. His daddy Allan has a 25 million dollar Bombardier 5000.
    While I know absolutely nothing about their matter with AIG other than what's public and on PACER, I do know the family well.
    You make our own conclusions. They each own 20 mil homes in Nassau, nearly 75 million in planes, and many, many other very nice things. While I don't begrudge hard working folks the spoils,, one has to think maybe AIG has something right????

  • Reply to

    Coventry

    by uaddan65 Sep 2, 2015 12:07 AM

    Coventry is in the retail market under their subsidiary Coventry direct. That's their arm which refers clients to their parent firm.
    From what I'm told by some folks in NY closely following their trial, their goose is cooked. Getting their money back from Nassau is a totally different story. Maybe aig will get one of their 3 planes.

  • trgsam trgsam Jul 27, 2015 9:19 AM Flag

    why does it seem like a few of the posters are still former principals or friends of LPHI??

  • trgsam trgsam Jul 22, 2015 6:15 PM Flag

    I tend to think that Phillyguy has the right idea and approach. There are a few funds still willing to provide bridge financing for this asset class. While it is expensive financing, it will alleviate the need for investors to continue to pay premiums while the court and various litigants and trustee vie for positions. I know this isn't an ideal solution, but given what will invariably be outrageous legal fees for anyone and everyone. It might behoove many people to weigh their legal fees vs the certainty of the cost of financing.
    Just a thought

  • Reply to

    Claims

    by littlefield2615 Jul 15, 2015 1:43 PM
    trgsam trgsam Jul 19, 2015 6:54 AM Flag

    Unfortunately having been t of the industry for the past few years, we didn't store our files unless required to do so for regulatory purposes, I believe a maximum of. 5 years in certain states. I would think the other settlement brokers, most still in business, have the appropriate files and their principals are still working in the industry. It shouldn't be too challenging for a good attorney or trustee to subpoena them or their files on a handful of the larger cases they did with LPI and any competitor bids. I would also think they could speak with the current and former case managers for those brokers.
    I understand this is time consuming and likely challenging, and the trustee has many more important issues at hand, and with so many moving parts, prioritaztion is very important, but having seen that side of the business for so many years, I wanted to give this board something else to consider.

  • Reply to

    Claims

    by littlefield2615 Jul 15, 2015 1:43 PM
    trgsam trgsam Jul 18, 2015 4:32 PM Flag

    Call me carzy and maybe stubborn, and by no means am I trying to insult the intelligence of anyone on this board, including Suva, Antislapp and Phillyguy as well as many others of you, but I am still stuck on how the life settlement brokers could have colluded with Pardo and LPI to sell them polices, as a broker, well under the actual market offers, to secure significantly higher commissions. As a former broker, life settlement broker, and likely one of the largest for many years handling over 1.5 billion in trades, I clearly recall the calls we received from Pardo and his minions on certain larger deals. They would routinely call us, knowing full well their offer was well under other buyers/providers, and offer us fees well in excess of 10% of the DB. They also would tell us they had a way to avoid what was then a statutory requirement for full fee disclosure.
    That just felt way too "hinky" for me and we passed on dealing with them but recall speaking to other broker/.competitors who not only told us the exact same stories but laughed about how ten they did this with them.
    I know there are many parties who are involved and many very unfortunate people who lost a lot of money. I also know the main focus on on the investment side, but I'm told some of these life settlement brokers are still in business, many with very wealthy principals. Shouldn't creditors be looking to them as well for possible losses due to possible bid rigging resulting in massive overpayments based on fals le's and collusion? I'm not an attorney but was in the business for nearly 15 years and recall how this game was played. What broker, other than us, could turn down a fee of 1 million dollars on a 15 mil deal to not shop the deal and assure it went to LPI? Other than us, and I'm sure a few others, most didn#$%$ not too difficult to narrow down the possible players.

  • Reply to

    LPHI Licensee Commission Claw Back

    by tafdme32 Jul 14, 2015 4:47 PM
    trgsam trgsam Jul 15, 2015 6:12 PM Flag

    very true. I was introduced to them by Gary C and John B at Viaticus. Worst mistake I ever had!!!!

    Sentiment: Strong Sell

  • Reply to

    LPHI Licensee Commission Claw Back

    by tafdme32 Jul 14, 2015 4:47 PM
    trgsam trgsam Jul 15, 2015 10:11 AM Flag

    Do you mean "provider" and not "broker" re the fine? Based on your moniker, I think you're referring to the provider in the same city as you.

  • Reply to

    LPHI Licensee Commission Claw Back

    by tafdme32 Jul 14, 2015 4:47 PM
    trgsam trgsam Jul 15, 2015 9:24 AM Flag

    While I agree on most of your points, LPI would routinely call the brokers and ask them to sell them a policy at a lower price while also promising them a much higher, and in may instances undisclosed, commission. That's a breach of the brokers fiduciary responsibility, taking a lower offer in exchange for higher fees and non disclosed which was a requirement in many states.

  • Reply to

    LPHI Licensee Commission Claw Back

    by tafdme32 Jul 14, 2015 4:47 PM
    trgsam trgsam Jul 14, 2015 6:30 PM Flag

    Suva, why are you ignoring the life settlement brokers , who in many circumstances made close to or in excess of 10% of the DB on single trades? I understand why the agents who sold this #$%$ are easier prey, but there are at least 5 large lif settlement brokers, most still in business, who made millions on fees when dealing with LPHI. I can easilynname them but any market player knows them as well. Why aren't the creditors pursuit no them as well???

    Sentiment: Strong Sell

  • Reply to

    Docket 564 - Definition of a Creditor

    by angellaj2112 Jul 10, 2015 5:06 PM
    trgsam trgsam Jul 14, 2015 6:25 PM Flag

    Have your considered their e&O coverag? Many policies are based on the date the fraud might have occurred. Again I'm not an attorney but it my sure many qualified folks on this board understand this issue. Many insurers are concerned with the date the infraction on occurred as opposed to when you filed it.
    I completely defer to folks like Suva and others who know much more than i

    Sentiment: Strong Sell

  • Reply to

    Docket 564 - Definition of a Creditor

    by angellaj2112 Jul 10, 2015 5:06 PM
    trgsam trgsam Jul 14, 2015 4:33 PM Flag

    Can I ask why you, and the other investors, are not pursuing claims against the life settlement brokers who, in many instances, made upwards of 10% of the DB is in fees? I know this might be another monkey wrench the in the scene, but many of these forms are still operating and fiscally sound. Just. Suggestion to consider

  • Reply to

    Premium Payment court order

    by taught434 Jun 22, 2015 3:05 PM
    trgsam trgsam Jun 26, 2015 7:38 AM Flag

    Maybe I'm nuts, but the last time I checked, CSV meant cash surrender value.

  • Reply to

    Premium Payment court order

    by taught434 Jun 22, 2015 3:05 PM
    trgsam trgsam Jun 23, 2015 7:12 PM Flag

    Another avenue to consider are the egregious fees paid to the life settlement brokers. Many of them are still in business and are easily identify. Most are located in Florida, however not all. In many circumstances these brokers made fees in excess of 10% of the death benefit. I'm sure, although have no specific information, that deals were made with those brokers to accept lower offers from LPI in exchange for higher, non disclosed fees, sometimes into the six and seven figures. You, the investor, paid every one of these fees, and since many are still operating, have a decent chance at a clawback if the trustee and courts decide to pursue them.
    Why not look under every rock in an attempt to recoup as much money as possible??

    Sentiment: Strong Sell