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Organovo Holdings, Inc. Message Board

twojugglers 194 posts  |  Last Activity: May 22, 2016 11:37 AM Member since: Apr 6, 1998
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  • twojugglers twojugglers May 22, 2016 11:37 AM Flag

    Thanks Navy,

    My pleasure.

    Juggsy

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • B. Lucendo-Villarin , H. Rashidi , K. Cameron and D. C. Hay *
    Medical Research Council Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Edinburgh, 5 Little France Drive, Edinburgh, EH16 4UU, Scotland, UK.

    Received 5th February 2016 , Accepted 14th April 2016
    First published on the web 15th April 2016

    "Recently Organovo's exVive3D bioprinted liver tissue (Organovo®; USA) has been shown to secrete fibrinogen, albumin and transferrin in proportion to levels observed in vivo.123 Regarding PSCs, valve-based cell printers have been developed to print viable PSC and HLC populations, and offer the promise of automated tissue manufacture for clinical and research applications."

    "......To date, differentiation protocols are mainly performed using 2D culture systems lacking the relevant cell types. Recent progress in the field, including; combinatorial approaches and three-dimensional and co-culture strategies provide the promise of more sophisticated systems in the future."

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Abstract
    Intestinal transplantation remains a life-saving option for patients with severe intestinal failure. With the advent of advanced tissue engineering techniques, great strides have been made toward manufacturing replacement tissues and organs, including the intestine, aiming to avoid transplant-related complications. The current paradigm is to seed a bio-compatible support material (‘scaffold’) with a desired cell population in order to generate viable replacement tissue. While this technique has now been extended by the three-dimensional (3D) printing of geometrically complex scaffolds, the overall approach is hindered by relatively slow turnover and negative effects of residual scaffold material, which affects final clinical outcome. Methods recently developed for ‘scaffold-free’ 3D bioprinting may overcome such obstacles and should allow for rapid manufacture and deployment of “bioprinted organs.” Much work remains before 3D bioprinted tissues can enter clinical use. In this brief review we examine the present state and future perspectives of this nascent technology prior to full clinical implementation.

    Disclosures: The authors of this work collaborate with Organovo, Inc., manufacturer of a commercially available 3D bioprinter.

    Published May 14, 2016
    In the Journal: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Anke Hartung, et al:

    ERG signaling in prostate cancer is driven through PRMT5-dependent methylation of the
    2 Androgen Receptor

    Abstract
    23 The TMPRSS2:ERG gene fusion is common in androgen receptor (AR) positive prostate
    24 cancers, yet its function remains poorly understood. From a screen for functionally relevant ERG
    25 interactors, we identify the arginine methyltransferase PRMT5. ERG recruits PRMT5 to AR-
    26 target genes, where PRMT5 methylates AR on arginine 761. This attenuates AR recruitment and
    27 transcription of genes expressed in differentiated prostate epithelium. The AR-inhibitory
    28 function of PRMT5 is restricted to TMPRSS2:ERG-positive prostate cancer cells. Mutation of
    29 this methylation site on AR results in a transcriptionally hyperactive AR, suggesting that the
    30 proliferative effects of ERG and PRMT5 are mediated through attenuating AR’s ability to induce
    31 genes normally involved in lineage differentiation. This provides a rationale for targeting
    32 PRMT5 in TMPRSS2:ERG positive prostate cancers. Moreover, methylation of AR at arginine
    33 761 highlights a mechanism for how the ERG oncogene may coax AR towards inducing
    34 proliferation versus differentiation.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Reply to

    Tentative earnings: June 9, after close (Schwab)

    by drzzzzzzz May 20, 2016 10:13 AM
    twojugglers twojugglers May 20, 2016 6:17 PM Flag

    Market Competition Assessment

    According to market experts competition in 3D bioprinting market is low and barriers are high. Competition is low due to presence of niche opportunities in the healthcare industry and barriers are high because the research is very specialized and requires a significant amount of investment, usually by the government or private donors, while the risks to profitability remain very high. 3D Systems, Inc. and Stratasys Ltd. dominate the 3D printer applications in healthcare market. The other upcoming key players such as Organovo, Inc. and EnvisionTEC, Inc. are expected to be one of the leading players in 3D bioprinting market in the near future.

    Key Market Movements

    Gap between patients waiting for organ transplant and available organ donors

    Rising demand for cost-efficient technologies in drug development processes

    Growth in adoption of 3D bioprinted bone grafts and dental consumables

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • San Francisco

    Top innovators head to San Francisco in July for first-ever cellular agriculture conference

    The world’s leading cellular agriculture innovators will meet in The Presidio in San Francisco this summer to take part in the first-ever global conference devoted to the animal-free food economy, New Harvest announced.

    Cellular agriculture is an emerging field where agriculture products are made from cell cultures.

    New Harvest, the non-profit research institute that is accelerating the revolution around animal products made without animals, announced that the event will take pace on July 13 in the U.S. tech capital.

    New Harvest 2016: Experience Cellular Agriculture, will feature the movement’s leading companies and researchers, who will meet to discuss the latest advancements in this critical field.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • twojugglers twojugglers May 18, 2016 9:50 AM Flag

    LOL

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Reply to

    3D Bioprinting Wins Medical Innovation Contest

    by twojugglers May 18, 2016 7:10 AM
    twojugglers twojugglers May 18, 2016 9:13 AM Flag

    Ron,
    As far as I can tell, neither the researchers nor the medical center has filed for any patents on the work they are doing. First time they hear of Organovo may be the day they hear from Organovo's patent attorneys. Plus, I think the article way overstates how far along they are. At best, as far as I can tell, they have done some work with the trachea.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Northwell Health:

    {Northwell Health provides seamless, coordinated care to our service area of more than 7 million New Yorkers. Our team strives to change and save lives by delivering compassionate, expert care in safe and comfortable environments.

    The health network contains 21 hospitals, three skilled nursing facilities, many specialty programs and institutes, and more than 12,000 member physicians. Our reach is expanded through our national and international affiliates. The Northwell Health Physician Partners employs nearly 2,700 full-time physicians and offers nearly 400 regional ambulatory locations and physician practices, all to ensure that great care is always convenient }

    "Congratulations to 3D Bioprinting!

    Over the past few weeks, nearly half million votes came in for three of our new innovations: the Blood Loss Manager, the 3D Bioprinter, and the Patient ID Shield. Visitors cast their votes for the innovations they believed could have the most impact on the future of health care. 3D Bioprinting stole the spotlight!"

    A revolutionary new way to "print" living cells and tissues

    "This isn’t the latest sci-fi blockbuster; it’s simply a day at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research where we’re creating customized, live medical implants. Combining two emerging fields — 3D printing and tissue engineering — Feinstein Institute researchers are developing a “bioprinted” implant design that uses a patient’s own living cells.

    The future is sooner than you think.

    We're working to develop alternatives to many traditional medical treatments, including researching ways to create living tissue made of bone or cartilage. Bioprinting has the potential to replace many different parts of the human body. We envision a not-too-distant future with 3D printers in every emergency room and doctors printing functional organ and bone implants.

    This isn’t science fiction. It’s real science, right now, at Northwell Health."

    From Juggsy: Anyone here know this Place?

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • twojugglers twojugglers May 18, 2016 12:29 AM Flag

    Wildflower? LOL
    Wildfire.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Organovo has added a webpage to their site labeled "European Societies of Toxicology" No content on that page yet.

    A new bioprinting SlideShare presentation has popped up. Its worth watching, and does mention Organovo:

    If you search "Bioprinting Presentation Slideshare" it will be about the 5th result. I can't put links up here, but after Slideshare, look for this: ViralkumarJayswal/bio-printing-presentation-62088347

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • twojugglers twojugglers May 17, 2016 4:00 PM Flag

    "Bones in our body are living tissue. They have their own blood vessels and are made of living cells, which help them to grow and to repair themselves. As well, proteins, minerals and vitamins make up the bone. We are born with about 300 soft bones."

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • twojugglers twojugglers May 17, 2016 12:51 PM Flag

    And say they will be making Organs On A Chip, as well as other MicroFluidic chips.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Reply to

    Queensland

    by e7navy1999 May 16, 2016 8:46 AM
    twojugglers twojugglers May 17, 2016 9:38 AM Flag

    ron,
    Bet you didn't like this either then:

    "Janssen Research and Development, a Johnson & Johnson pharmaceutical company, is looking into 3D printing living tissue for drug research, according to a document filed with the SEC Thursday. The company will partner with Organovo, an expert in bioprinting.

    Organovo has 3D-printed everything from blood vessels to thyroid tissue, and has long-term plans to print entire organs. Later this year it will begin offering liver tissue to drug companies for testing the toxicity of drugs — its first commercial product.

    Janssen is more interested in using 3D-printed tissue to discover drugs. By exposing many different 3D-printed cells to many different early-stage drugs, it can determine which are the most effective. Janssen and Organovo did not disclose further details about the agreement.

    Organovo announced a partnership with the National Institutes of Health in January that focuses on printing eye tissue for drug and disease studies.

    “Researchers who develop new therapies for patients are too often hampered by animal models and traditional cell culture models that are poor predictors of drug efficacy and toxicity in human beings,” Organovo CEO Keith Murphy said in a January release. “Our 3D printer creates living human tissues that more closely reproduce in vivo human tissues.”

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Reply to

    Bioprinting frontier, DDN News, May 2016

    by twojugglers May 16, 2016 6:25 PM
    twojugglers twojugglers May 16, 2016 6:47 PM Flag

    At the SOT Annual Meeting, Organovo and its pharmaceutical customers—including Bristol-Myers Squibb, Astellas, Merck and L’Oreal—highlighted recent results that showed how the 3D bioprinted human liver tissue “effectively models in-vivo tissue composition and physiology.” The company currently offers the liver model as a service to customers including four of the top 25 global pharmaceutical companies, but hopes to deliver it as a product, Gallant comments.

    According to Dr. Sharon Presnell, Organovo’s chief technology officer and executive vice president of research and development, “Drug-induced liver injury remains a major cause of late-stage clinical failures and market withdrawal, often due to poor translation from preclinical animal studies to clinical outcomes. Organovo’s exVive3D human liver model replicates complex cell-cell interactions and key elements of native tissue architecture to enable the detection of multiple clinically relevant modes of tissue injury, including necrosis, immune-mediated tissue damage, steatosis and fibrosis. When a preclinical or clinical-stage asset presents a challenging safety or efficacy signal, exVive3D provides the unique resolving power of a controlled human tissue microenvironment to investigate mechanism and develop solutions.”

    Organovo’s 3D human tissues have the potential to accelerate the drug discovery process, enabling treatments to be developed faster and at lower cost, according to Gallant. The exVive3D platform technology portfolio began with the recent launch of the exVive3D Human Liver Tissue for use in toxicology and other preclinical drug testing. Additional products are in the pipeline, with the anticipated release of the exVive3D Human Kidney Tissue scheduled for the third quarter of 2016.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Pharma, Biotech and Life Science
    SAN DIEGO—Organovo Holdings Inc. presented five sessions at the Society of Toxicology’s (SOT) 55th Annual Meeting and ToxExpo, March 13 to 17, in New Orleans to demonstrate the broad applicability of its exVive3D Human Liver Model for the assessment of drug safety and the detection of clinically relevant modes of liver injury, including steatosis and fibrosis.

    Organovo, which is “a marriage of engineering and biology,” uses 3D bioprinting technology to develop three-dimensional human tissues aimed at “delivering scientific and medical breakthroughs,” according to Paul Gallant, general manager. The result is better models for preclinical testing, he said, adding that “There is a need in drug discovery for preclinical models that translate into the human condition better than rodents.”

    “Current methods of preclinical using in-vitro assays in a test tube or in-vivo assays with animals fall short,” he explains. “Using complex human tissue, we can do experiments we were never able to do before.”

    Organovo, which began in 2007 with technology licensed from the University of Missouri, has compiled validation data over the past year to research compounds known to be toxic and drugs that are toxic to the liver. According to Gallant, “No in-vitro models could have detected could have detected this data. This is the only tissue model where researchers can induce fibrotic disease and detect disease and toxicity by using human tissues.”

    The exVive3D Human Liver Model is created by taking primary cells, putting them into bio ink and putting them on a 3D printer in spatially controlled matter. As Gallant explains, “For instance, the liver has three different cell types. We build a physical piece of tissue and measure metabolic, genomic and biochemical endpoints.”

    The model “provides an accurate, predictive and reproducible model of human liver biology for preclinical toxicity testing,” Gallant adds. At the SOT Annual Meeting, Organovo and

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Disclosures: The authors of this work collaborate with Organovo, Inc., manufacturer of a commercially available 3D bioprinter.

    Abstract
    "Intestinal transplantation remains a life-saving option for patients with severe intestinal failure. With the advent of advanced tissue engineering techniques, great strides have been made toward manufacturing replacement tissues and organs, including the intestine, aiming to avoid transplant-related complications. The current paradigm is to seed a bio-compatible support material (‘scaffold’) with a desired cell population in order to generate viable replacement tissue. While this technique has now been extended by the three-dimensional (3D) printing of geometrically complex scaffolds, the overall approach is hindered by relatively slow turnover and negative effects of residual scaffold material, which affects final clinical outcome. Methods recently developed for ‘scaffold-free’ 3D bioprinting may overcome such obstacles and should allow for rapid manufacture and deployment of “bioprinted organs.” Much work remains before 3D bioprinted tissues can enter clinical use. In this brief review we examine the present state and future perspectives of this nascent technology prior to full clinical implementation."

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • magine a hospital printing a bone implant customized for an individual patient’s specific anatomy.

    Imagine a surgeon being able to practice major surgery on their patient’s exact heart replica.

    Imagine replacing a drug cocktail with one pill that has the exact dosage, released at the exact time, printed just for you, for your specific condition.

    Imagine performing high-risk but potentially life-saving clinical trials on human tissue that’s printed in a lab – not on actual patients.

    Imagine a day when patients waiting for an organ transplant don’t have to die because the hospital is printing that organ for them while they wait in the pre-op room.

    3D-Printed Surgical Implants. Companies like Epibone use 3D scans to custom-grow bone replacements for patients. At least one man already had a custom 3D printed vertebra implanted to treat a tumor in a particularly hard-to-reach location. Implications: no need for bone resurfacing, reduced risk of premature loosening of the implant, reduced need for fitting of filler components – all this leading to better health outcomes.
    3D-Printed Medical Models and Prosthetics. Heart specialists at Spectrum Health already printed an accurate 3D model of a human heart. Implications: reduction in surgical errors, shorter time of individual procedures, less patient time under anesthesia – all this leading to better health outcomes.
    3D-Printed Pills. The FDA already approved a 3D printed pill for epilepsy. Implications: improved patient adherence, reduced risks of self-dosing or overdosing, and once again, better health outcomes for people on variety of medications.
    3D-Printed Tissues and Organs. This is the bleeding edge, the vision, and the inspiration for many innovators pushing the boundaries of 3D printing in modern medicine. Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine is engineering over 30 tissues and whole organs. The company Organovo offers bioprinted human tissue models for transplant and for clinical trials. Already in commercial use, the SkinGun sprays patient’s own self-donated stem cells to treat and heal burns, regenerating skin faster than traditional treatment methods like grafting.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Authors
    Dr. Falguni Pati,
    Dr. Jesper Gantelius,
    Prof. Helene Andersson Svahn

    Division of Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology, Science for Life Laboratory, KTH-Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden

    (We know all this already. Not "News")

    In vitro tissue/organ models are useful platforms that can facilitate systematic, repetitive, and quantitative investigations of drugs/chemicals. The primary objective when developing tissue/organ models is to reproduce physiologically relevant functions that typically require complex culture systems. Bioprinting offers exciting prospects for constructing 3D tissue/organ models, as it enables the reproducible, automated production of complex living tissues. Bioprinted tissues/organs may prove useful for screening novel compounds or predicting toxicity, as the spatial and chemical complexity inherent to native tissues/organs can be recreated. In this Review, we highlight the importance of developing 3D in vitro tissue/organ models by 3D bioprinting techniques, characterization of these models for evaluating their resemblance to native tissue, and their application in the prioritization of lead candidates, toxicity testing, and as disease/tumor models.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • A. Collin de l'Hortet1, K. Takeishi1, J. Guzman-Lepe1, K. Handa3, K. Matsubara3, K. Fukumitsu4, K. Dorko5, S. C. Presnell5, H. Yagi3 andA. Soto-Gutierrez1,2,*
    Article first published online: 18 FEB 2016

    Organovo's Sharon Presnell involved in this:

    Liver transplantation, either a partial liver from a living or deceased donor or a whole liver from a deceased donor, is the only curative therapy for severe end-stage liver disease. Only one-third of those on the liver transplant waiting list will be transplanted, and the demand for livers is projected to increase 23% in the next 20 years. Consequently, organ availability is an absolute constraint on the number of liver transplants that can be performed. Regenerative therapies aim to enhance liver tissue repair and regeneration by any means available (cell repopulation, tissue engineering, biomaterials, proteins, small molecules, and genes). Recent experimental work suggests that liver repopulation and engineered liver tissue are best suited to the task if an unlimited availability of functional induced pluripotent stem (iPS)–derived liver cells can be achieved. The derivation of iPS cells by reprogramming cell fate has opened up new lines of investigation, for instance, the generation of iPS-derived xenogeneic organs or the possibility of simply inducing the liver to reprogram its own hepatocyte function after injury. We reviewed current knowledge about liver repopulation, generation of engineered livers and reprogramming of liver function. We also discussed the numerous barriers that have to be overcome for clinical implementation.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

ONVO
2.59+0.04(+1.57%)May 23 4:02 PMEDT