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Hewlett-Packard Company Message Board

vt_investor 239 posts  |  Last Activity: May 1, 2015 12:05 AM Member since: Apr 29, 1999
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  • vt_investor vt_investor Mar 19, 2015 4:14 PM Flag

    How much of the snow in those ski areas is man-made, and how much is natural snowfall?

    The headline, according to the Cal. Dept. of Water Resources says, "Despite recent snowfall, the Sierra Nevada snowpack, critical to California's water supply, is near a historic low for early March.", and also says that the snow pack is just 19% of what is normally expected.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • vt_investor vt_investor Mar 19, 2015 1:59 PM Flag

    It's clear that building more dams on rivers that are already dammed is not going to be much help. Check the real data. California's reservoirs are currently at about 46% capacity, and the California snow pack is right now at 19% of normal. That snow pack will have a hard time keeping the reservoirs even at the current 46% capacity as it melts over the next 3 or 4 months.

    The problem is the amount of water in the existing reservoirs, not the number of reservoirs. The problem is entirely the amount of water that is now available to put in the reservoirs and use.

    And this problem is not just California's problem. 85% of California's water is used for agriculture to produce food for the rest of us. It appears that they must cut their use of water in half, just because the water is not there. Cutting their water use in half must have a big impact on the amount of food they can grow for the whole nation. Discussion are even now in progress to build pipelines from places as far away as Wisconsin to pump water west

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    GOP Proves Again and Again: They Can't Govern

    by trueallday Mar 19, 2015 10:23 AM
    vt_investor vt_investor Mar 19, 2015 11:29 AM Flag

    It's been just a few weeks since Republicans took full control of Congress, but it is safe to say they have no earthly idea of what they want to accomplish, or how to do it. They clearly show exactly what the problem is now in Washington.

    The Democrats are strongly united against whatever the Republican try now, if only because their opposition is so weak, and disorganized. If the Republicans had any rational bi-partisan approaches to fix what ails us, the Democrats would fall apart and support them in many cases. Instead, they vote unanimously against every effort the Republicans make.

    If the Republican had some well thought out plans, they would have a chance to take control of Congress and the White House for the next decade or more, but they don't have any such plans. If they could put together a plan that invests in our foundations, including jobs, R&D, health care, education, defense, and our national infrastructure, they would have a chance to fix many of our current problems, including the deficit and debt (Think of Dwight Eisenhower). With the right plan, they could also get support from Obama, who, in reality, is probably one of the the most conservative presidents we have had in a long time. But, instead, as long as the Republicans focus on ideological differences, rather than on building a strong nation, both within their party, and nationwide, they have little chance at success, either for the Republican party, or for the nation, sadly.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    The best argument for oil pipeliens

    by w.heinlein Mar 17, 2015 6:22 PM
    vt_investor vt_investor Mar 18, 2015 2:16 PM Flag

    The oil is being shipped to east coast and west coats refineries by rain now - hence the recent big derailments and fires. Safer pipelines woudl replace the currently unsafe rail transportation.

    There is absolutely no need for more refineries. The number of refineries in the US has been dripping for decades. That's partly due to consolidation, but also due the fact that the US is using less and less oil, and refined products every year. You don't build new factories for buggy whips, or gasoline when the demand is dropping at an accelerating pace.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    Barry's interferrence backfires

    by springer_1994 Mar 18, 2015 7:33 AM
    vt_investor vt_investor Mar 18, 2015 2:08 PM Flag

    Springer, it looks like didn't understand what WH meant (and implied) when he said that he had relatives living in Israel, and that he had visited there many time, and traveled all over the country. That would be the only rational explanation for your comment.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    Relief rally today?

    by langosta_fla Mar 18, 2015 9:30 AM
    vt_investor vt_investor Mar 18, 2015 1:55 PM Flag

    Obama didn't eliminate any work requirement for welfare. What he did do was to eliminate some federal regulations, and let states decided what work requirements are best in their states, especially given the different effects of the recession in each state. (Isn't that the conservative approach? Reduce federal regulations, and let the sates do it themselves?)

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    Relief rally today?

    by langosta_fla Mar 18, 2015 9:30 AM
    vt_investor vt_investor Mar 18, 2015 12:35 PM Flag

    I've been to Europe many times. There are pros and cons to everyone's infrastructure. Many countries in europe have faster Internet speeds than the US, for example, But others, don't. Also travel is often easier and faster in Europe. For example, you can travel form London to Rome, or Lisbon to Berlin from city center to city center at 150-200 mph (although the speed drops to 100 mph through the Channel tunnel).

    Work has been required for a lot of welfare, including food stamps, although states were given more local control during the recession, when jobs were not always available.

    There is a chicken and egg problem than needs to be solved. If we wait for welfare and food stamp use to drop before we invest in our infrastructure, we will probably never invest in our infrastructure.

    The only time in the past century that we had a balanced federal budget, and began to pay off our debt, we had full employment, as we invested in our computer and Internet infrastructure. A lot of that investment was paid for with federal money for R&D, SBA loans, and education, among other things. the result was full employment, with everyone who wanting a job having a good one with good pay. This resulted in low demand for things like food stamps, cutting federal welfare costs, while increasing the taxes collected. We were also helped by no big ars, and lower DoD expenses.

    So, the question is, do we wait (and hope) for people to get off welfare, with few good jobs available, or do we invest in things that will provide the needed jobs, and the education needed to get good, high-paying jobs?

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    Relief rally today?

    by langosta_fla Mar 18, 2015 9:30 AM
    vt_investor vt_investor Mar 18, 2015 10:36 AM Flag

    But consider the fact that the Fed rate was about 5% in 1995, the middle of long bull run. For those who are long-term investors, the fact that our national infrastructure is in terrible condition and needs trillions in new investment to remain competitive with Europe and Asia. I still think that the DOW will be well above 2,000 in just a few years because of the huge needs we have to rebuild homes, factories, and transportation facilities, and our general infrastructure. It won't be cheap, but it will be profitable for those who invest in the effort.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    The Fed and the Economy

    by w.heinlein Mar 16, 2015 6:51 PM
    vt_investor vt_investor Mar 18, 2015 10:23 AM Flag

    From David Chavern, COO of the US Chamber of Commerce:

    Manufacturing jobs have dropped – a lot. U.S. manufacturing jobs peaked at 19.5 million in 1979. But by 2010, the number of Americans employed in manufacturing fell to a new low of 11.4 million. Where did those jobs go? Mostly to a country called “productivity.” Technological change, automation, and widespread use of information technologies have enabled firms to boost output even as some have cut payrolls. These advancements are allowing us to make high-value-added products that drive growth, innovation, and competitiveness.

    U.S. manufacturing output on a value-added basis actually rose by 73% between 1993 and 2011. And in 2011, at 4% growth, U.S. manufacturing output grew at more than twice the rate of the overall economy. The U.S. share of global manufacturing output has remained basically steady for the past 40 years. don’t believe it when people say that we’re being surpassed by competitors.

    Some U.S. manufacturing production has gone overseas to be closer to customers -- after all, 95% of the world's consumers live outside the United States. And some low-value, labor-intensive production -- think t-shirts -- has been permanently lost to low-cost competitors. But U.S. manufacturing can strengthen its global competitiveness if our nation's core competencies and knowledge are allowed to grow and thrive. Achieving that comes down to the three Ps—People, Perspective, and Policies:

    People. The manufacturing industry needs a workforce with the advanced skills and training needed on today’s technology driven factory floor.

    Perspective. the administration and Congress should embrace the idea that the U.S. should be the very best place in the world to do business—and they must advance policies that will make it reality.

    Policies. Many of our standing policies have done fundamental, long-term damage to our manufacturing sector.

    NOTE that he says nothing about black, or illegals.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    The best argument for oil pipeliens

    by w.heinlein Mar 17, 2015 6:22 PM
    vt_investor vt_investor Mar 17, 2015 11:57 PM Flag

    Yes, and those pipelines need to head east and west, not north and south. Pipelines for natural gas, especially, but also oil, as well.

    I read somewhere that the reason that the Bakken oil is so explosive is that the lightweight hydrocarbons that are the most flammable are not extracted before shipping. In many places those lightweight hydrocarbons, mostly flammable gases are removed to make shipment safer. They can't do that yet in N. Dakota because there is no way to process or ship those natural gases there .

    Sentiment: Hold

  • vt_investor vt_investor Mar 17, 2015 11:49 PM Flag

    Having a snowfall, and having enough snowfalls to last through the summer are two entirely different things.

    Colorado Mountain Snow Is Bright Spot During Drought in West (fox news)

    Snowpack in the mountain valleys where the Colorado River originates was only a little below normal on Wednesday, marking one of the few bright spots in an increasingly grim drought gripping much of the West.

    Measurement stations in western Colorado showed the snowpack at 90 percent of the long-term average.

    By contrast, reporting stations in the Sierra Nevada range in drought-stricken California showed snowpack at 50 percent or less in early February, the most recent figures available. Some detected no snow at all.

    Mountain snow in Colorado is closely monitored because a half-dozen Western waterways, including the 1,400-mile Colorado River, start in the area. The river and its tributaries supply water to millions of people in seven states and Mexico.

    Much of the river comes from mountain snow that accumulates during winter and melts in the spring.

    ...

    In the Pacific Northwest, warm temperatures have brought rain instead of snow, so the mountains aren't accumulating snowpack for the spring runoff, when farmers and water managers need water to irrigate crops and refill reservoirs.

    Snow Drought Forces California Ski Areas to Close

    An ongoing drought of snow has coupled with unseasonably warm weather to force at least three northern California ski areas to turn off their lifts and one cross-country resort to hang a closed sign on their trail network.
    --------------
    I'll check to see what it's actually like when I get to Alta in a week or so, but it still looks like there is no where near a deep enough snowpack to fill many reservoirs this spring and summer in the west, especially in California and the west coast..

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    Does anyone know...

    by ndfirstsection Mar 17, 2015 5:11 PM
    vt_investor vt_investor Mar 17, 2015 11:28 PM Flag

    Probably not, otherwise the candidates would have remained at home to campaign.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • vt_investor vt_investor Mar 17, 2015 3:12 PM Flag

    What snowfall? Drought conditions from the Rocky mountains west to the Cascades, Sierra Nevadas, and Pacific are listed as severe, extreme, and even exceptional. That's the issue that we are discussing. There is no snow pack, or rain, and has been none to fill the rivers and reservoirs for a couple of years now.. It's been warm (in the 60's) and dry in places like Billings, MT for a while now. Not much rain or snow, and temps plenty high enough to dry everything out, anyway. Maybe they could build a pipeline from Wisconsin and pump the water they need from there!

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    The Fed and the Economy

    by w.heinlein Mar 16, 2015 6:51 PM
    vt_investor vt_investor Mar 17, 2015 11:42 AM Flag

    Exactly. What do we need to do to help the other 80%

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    Yahoo sensors

    by springer_1994 Mar 17, 2015 8:22 AM
    vt_investor vt_investor Mar 17, 2015 11:40 AM Flag

    Oops. typo. "began ENFORCING existing federal law"

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    Yahoo sensors

    by springer_1994 Mar 17, 2015 8:22 AM
    vt_investor vt_investor Mar 17, 2015 11:39 AM Flag

    That's exactly what I said. Try again. The IRS began endorsing existing federal law which says that political groups can't be tax free,and can't allow anonymous tax free contribution. Has Congress changed that law yet? If buying elections, with government subsidies, is the only thing you can do to win, what you gonna do?

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    Yahoo sensors

    by springer_1994 Mar 17, 2015 8:22 AM
    vt_investor vt_investor Mar 17, 2015 11:18 AM Flag

    Are you now saying that the Republicans lost the last election?

    Or is it just that making it harder to buy elections with anonymous federal tax deductions (which federal law still says is illegal) is now hurting today's Republicans?

    Sentiment: Hold

  • vt_investor vt_investor Mar 16, 2015 1:43 PM Flag

    "Try again Vt - the wage is 15 dollars an hour"
    Springer the thread was about Walmart raising their minimum wages to $10/hr. But if you want to change the discussion to $15/hr, we can do the math again.

    At $15/hr, working 60 hours a week, 52 weeks a year, with no time off at all for anything, the total income is still not $50k/year. As many have said here, working smarter (and not longer) is the best way to get a decent wage.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • vt_investor vt_investor Mar 16, 2015 12:47 PM Flag

    Springer, do the math - please.

    You don't get anywhere near $50K/year at $10/hr.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    As predicted

    by springer_1994 Mar 16, 2015 8:58 AM
    vt_investor vt_investor Mar 16, 2015 12:43 PM Flag

    Interesting. you list a few unique upscale restaurateurs, but not a single burger doodle. I would think that if a higher minimum wage were really a problem it would certainly be a problem in the restaurants that charge the lowest prices, not the upscale, higher prices ones. Might there be some other reason for these particular restaurants closing, especially, as Lan says, the $15/hr minimum wage doesn't go into effect for a few more years.

    Sentiment: Hold

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